/ Single Malt Recommendations

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Malt_Loaf - on 23 Nov 2017
Hello Folks,

Looking for some single malt suggestions, not too pricey (no more than £35/40 ideally). I don't know a massive deal about Whisky but if I give you an idea what I've tried and like/don't like that might help!

Really like:

Laphroig
Talisker
Highland Park

Enjoyed:

Jura
Glenmorangie
Glenfiddich
Glenlivet
Maccallan

Not sure if that helps but any recommendations most welcome!

Thanks,
ML


mangoletse - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I got a Kilchoman Machir Bay recently and I'm sure that'll fit your bill admirably
Mal Grey - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

The correct answer for me is always Laphroaig Quartercask, but I'm also quite partial to an Ardbeg. Your "really like" list is rather similar to my own.
LastBoyScout on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Aberlour and Bowmore would be good additions.

I really like Bowmore Surf, but I can't find it anywhere anymore
Mooncat - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Springbank. If you can find a bottle.
afx22 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Ardbeg, if you like a peaty, smokey Islay style malt.
Aberlour is my favourite, especially A'bunadh
spenser - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I'm a big fan of Laphroaig Quarter Cask, have also very much enjoyed the following:
Ledaig
Ardbeg
Lagavulin 16 Year Old
Singleton Tailfire
Bruichladdich
jonnie3430 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Had a lovely 12 yo cragganmore last night, will pick up a bottle this weekend.
drunken monkey - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Really Like Category - I'd suggest Lagavulin

Enjoyed Category - Balvenie Doublewood
cb294 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Mooncat:

Springbank 10 yo is normally my first choice, too.

However, for my leaving do at my current job I was just given a bottle of 2002 Ardmore single cask that had been matured in a used Laphroaig oak cask for eight years before bottling. Can't wait to give that one try, but it will have to wait until I will have finished moving to my new uni!

CB
John2 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

If you like the Hebridean whiskies you should try Caol Ila, another one from Islay.
Philip on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

> Hello Folks,

> Looking for some single malt suggestions, not too pricey (no more than £35/40 ideally). I don't know a massive deal about Whisky but if I give you an idea what I've tried and like/don't like that might help!

Drink half as much and spend £70-80 a bottle. Whisky prices have rocketed, especially those with age statements. As a student my friend had Ardbeg 17 and 25, the 17 is now £499. Too much demand, hence all these silly named expressions trying to stretch a little mature spirit a long way.

Caol Ila 18yo
Lagavuillin (the standard expression is 16 yo and only £45-50)
Oban 14 - unless things have changed they age their barrels on the coast opposite Skye - same salty atmosphere as Islay.
Malt_Loaf - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
Perfect - thanks for all the replies so far. I do seem to like the peaty smokey flavors a lot. There's a lot of Whisky's I find nice and would never turn one down but they don't stand out in terms of their flavors - Glenlivit a prime example. I think I prefer something that's unique and packs a punch.

To comment on a few - I have been meaning to try Ardbeg and Lagavulin.

I have tried Singleton and wasn't a huge fan (though in fairness this was at a get together for a friends birthday so I probably wasn't in the best of conditions to appreciate it!).

I'll check out the other suggestions and keep an eye out for any coming up (there's usually excellent deals around Christmas in The Whiskey Exchange and the like).

Cheers!
Post edited at 13:27
Philip on 23 Nov 2017


> I'll check out the other suggestions and keep an eye out for any coming up (there's usually excellent deals around Christmas in The Whiskey Exchange and the like).

Put a pound in a jar every time you spell Whisky incorrectly and you'll soon have enough for a Talisker 25.

1
Philip on 23 Nov 2017
Malt_Loaf - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

I believe I have so far accrued one pound. If you could advise where I may be able to purchase a Talisker 25 for £1 then I would be very interested!

Malt_Loaf - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

Looks excellent value!
Siward on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Bunnahabhain is very nice, if only for its name. 18 year old is delicious I think
alanblyth - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I haven't anything to add to the peated category - doesn't get better than Laphroaig/Ardbeg for me, in the unpeated Aberlour is really good,

If you like variety - have a try at some Penderyn Myth, it's a good bottle for taking on a trip to Wales, partly because it's fun to drink Welsh Whisky in Wales, but more seriously because it's very accessible for sharing (If you like to share?),

Controversially there is also some adventure to be had in blends, Monkey Shoulder is a good example - and you don't feel too sacrilegious putting a dram in some coffee after dinner...
MonkeyPuzzle - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Siward:

My favourite. More rounded than Talisker and Laphraoig but still with plenty of smoke.
Malt_Loaf - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to alanblyth:
I have had Penderyn (I used to live in North Wales) and agree it's not bad at all.

Aberlour 12 is £27 pounds on amazon at the minute - seems excellent value if it's good. Any experience of the 12? Might be a good option for Christmas as it's more accessible as a sharer with family than my probably extreme taste.

ML
Post edited at 15:25
Michael Hood - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Shouldn't this thread be in The Pub forums? Especially one like Wasdale Head Inn - assuming they still have a copious number of whiskies to try
keith-ratcliffe on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to alanblyth:
+1 for Monkey Shoulder as a blend of malts. Another blend that I used to like is sadly no longer available Baillie Nicholl Jarvie.
A malt that hasn't been mentioned is Auchentoshan - one of only a few Lowland malts and very good.
nathan79 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Definitely go with the suggestion of Ardbeg. A lovely set of whiskies. Uigeadal is the pick of them but the bog standard 10 is a great dram.

Not a Laphroaig fan here, but if you're ever checking out airport whisky look out for Laphroaig PX. A litre of lovely whisky to be had.
nathan79 - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Siward:

The 12 is also tasty. Must pick up a bottle for the festive season.
Bulls Crack - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Kilkchoman Machir Bay is lovely - complex and coastal and Islay
Can't go far wrong with Ardbeg - Ueagedail or Corryvechian
Caol Ila Moch

Benromach 10 is a very good Speyside. (Glen Grant 10 is v good in n almost too balanced sort of way!)
Balblair 05 - very oily and coastal

Currently have a Wolfburn Northland on the go - really interesting for a 3 year old
Old_Times - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Winter Gold at £25 from Waitrose is a good all rounder. Likewise Highland Park. A lot depends on when, why and with whom you are having a dram.
Bulls Crack - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

+ £4.80 delivery = about £1.50 off!

£37.90 on Amazon Prime

preferred the unpeated version
gavmac on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Can I humbly suggest the Dailuaine 16 year - I'm a real fan of the Speyside drams.

Slightly above the budget but worth it.

Giving your preference for peaty whiskies, then the Lagavulin 16 year is cracking too.
daWalt on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Mortlach,
but you might struggle to crowbar this under your £40 limit - not renowned for being a cheap option
Moley on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Before prices rocketed I always kept at least 5 different bottles, and would chose whichever took my fancy at the time and this did vary immensely, depending on time of year, weather and mood!
Nothing that hasn't been mentioned, but a springbank (can't remember which) ticked most of the boxes. Nowadays in lucky to have a single bottle of malt in the cabinet - whatever I'm given for my birthday.

Alasdair Fulton - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Ardbeg Uigeadail....ok, a bit out your budget but one of the best malts for the price. My first couple of drams had me wondering if I'd missed the point, but halfway through the bottle and I'm sold SOLD. Lovely dram if you like the feistier side of Islay!
Kemics - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

You must try Tomatin - Cu Brochan (might have spelt that slightly wrong)

Rather than a really peaty whiskey, they’ve just lightly used peat so it’s got a really delicate flavour rather than laphroig which tastes like a mouthful of soil ;)!
Philip on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Bulls Crack:

What are you on about, unpeated port Charlotte would be like a vegan bacon sandwich. It defeats the point, and doesn't exist anyway.
Rob Parsons on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

> What are you on about, unpeated port Charlotte would be like a vegan bacon sandwich. It defeats the point ...

The problem is that Islay whiskys are a confected product: the peatiness is no longer anything to do with the natural production of the stuff, as it used to be; rather, it just results from a 'PPM of phenol' number dialled in by the external malting company, at the request of the distiller.

So it's no longer clear what 'the point' really is.

(Hey - don't get me wrong: I very much enjoy drinking the stuff. But it has to be accepted that it's all now somewhat artificial.)
mattrm - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I'd second the recommendations for Aberlour, Ardbeg and Lagavulin. Personally I'm a massive Lagavulin fan. It's widely regarded as the best for a good reason.

If you're looking for other Speyside malts, then I like the Benriach 10 year old. https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/28693/benriach-10-year-old

However if you want something in budget and a bit different but still very good, I'd strongly recommend Nikka from the Barrel - https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/2928/nikka-from-the-barrel

Even more of a stretch and very good - https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/23772/suntory-yamazaki-distillers-reserve - it's not the 12 year old, but that's a bit over priced these days. Oh for the days when no one had heard of it and it was cheap.

Again in the left field, I've never tried a bottle of Amrut Fusion, but it's well regarded.

Whoever said Monkey Shoulder, I've no idea why, it's awful. Avoid!
toad - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to mattrm:

The Amrut is lovely. I had a bottle for my birthday and I've kept a drop for a christmas treat
hokkyokusei - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Another vote here for Ardbeg and Lagavulin.
mattrm - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to toad:

> The Amrut is lovely. I had a bottle for my birthday and I've kept a drop for a christmas treat

I think I might have to buy a bottle for christmas.
MarkJH - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:


> So it's no longer clear what 'the point' really is.

I guess the point is the flavour. Nowadays, it is easy enough to produce spirit without malted grain, either but it makes a better drink and people prefer it. Maltsters use some peat during kilning because it makes a whisky that some consumers prefer. Not sure that there needs to be much of a point beyond that.
thebigfriendlymoose - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

If you want to complete your Islay education there are two obvious gaps in your experience: Ardbeg and Lagavulin. They, with Laphroaig are the absolute epitome of Islay. Often, I might prefer the likes of a Bunnahabhain or Bowmore (the "Darkest" is particularly nice) but in my heart I know that Ardbeg, Lagavulin, and Laphroaig epitomise the style, and drinking anything else is somehow ducking the issue. They should be experienced... even if you decide never to buy again!

All of the Amruts I have tried have been worthwhile - not subtle but a lot of flavour for the money . Same for Kavalan.

Personally, not a huge fan of Aberlour but there are some good expressions. A'dunadh is value from an abv/£ perspective but is a bit of a hot mess for my tastes. The 10 y.o. and normal Double Cask 12 y.o. are pleasant but bland (or maybe my tastes lack subtlety?). The Aberlour 12 non-chill filtered is very good but over-priced - but Booths occassionally have it on special offer and I swipe up multiple bottles.

My favourite "all round" whisky is Springbank Cask Strength 12 yo - the normal 12 yo and the 15 yo are also great: tarry, peatiness with sherry cask and maritime notes. Other great scotches that combine peatiness with other tastes (sherry, maritime etc etc) are the Benriach 10 yo and Old Pulteney (which is often on special offer in supermarkets) .

If you want a "Macallan-style" sherry cask experience, without peat notes, I would recommend any Glenfarclas or Glendronach.

Toccata on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to daWalt:

> Mortlach,

> but you might struggle to crowbar this under your £40 limit - not renowned for being a cheap option

The Wine Society’s own 12 yo single malt is Mortlach at £32. Quite superb.
alanblyth - on 23 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Yes - I have an open Aberlour 12 now, I really like the subtle sweetness and spice,
Malt_Loaf - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
Thanks for all the responses. It appears that I must try Ardbeg and Lagavulin - I hope to pick one of these up for the Christmas period!

I actually bought a bottle of Aberlour 12 last night from Morrisons £27.00 right now. Had a wee taste last night and enjoyed it, very smooth and loved the slight sweetness but it doesn't last in the mouth as long as i'd like but for £27 not bad at all! Not sure i'd want to pay the full £35+ for this particular expression but it's ideal as bottle to enjoy with my partner (she prefers more approachable Whisky rather than my kind of dram). As above - this is probably just my taste.

Plenty of suggestions to look into here!

Cheers
Post edited at 09:00
Rob Parsons on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to MarkJH:

> I guess the point is the flavour. Nowadays, it is easy enough to produce spirit without malted grain, either but it makes a better drink and people prefer it. Maltsters use some peat during kilning because it makes a whisky that some consumers prefer.

The maltsters will use whatever amount of peat the distillers ask for. But my point is that peat is no longer an intrinsically necessary part of the production process - as it certainly was when Islay whiskys were first being made. (That's to say: on Islay, peat was the obvious naturally occurring fuel with which to arrest the germination process.)

So, now, in that respect, the peatiness of these drinks is just a confected thing which can be varied at will. (Witness, at one end of the spectrum, 'Octomore'; and, at the other end, completely unpeated varieties.)

That's just the way it is, of course - but it means that the product is no longer, as it were, an 'agricultural' one, with a genuine sense of place. So it feels like something has been lost.

Now as I said: don't get me wrong - I love the stuff! But when downing a bottle of Lagavulin, I just don't kid myself that the flavour has anything to do with, for example, the casks maturing away in the sea-spray-laden air of Islay. Because I know that they will in fact have been matured in Diageo's warehouse complex in the middle of Fife ...

The current exception to all the above is, I guess, Kilchoman. So far as I know, they do *everything* local to their site.
Philip on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

Bruicladdich were sourcing local barley and don't a couple of the distillers still have their own maltings. Kilchoman are great, I went there the year they released their first bottle, but they've nothing old yet.
Cloverleaf - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

If you like Islay then two worth hunting out are 'Cask Islay' and 'Peat's Beast'. Both are superb whiskies. The Peat's Beast isn't as peated as its name implies but it's wonderfully fragrant Islay malt that has good depth while not being heavy.

I've moved away from the blended singles in favour of individual cask bottlings from the various merchants. Provenance have a brilliant Mortlach and another Dalluaine in my cabinet right now. The Mortlach is 'only' 8 yrs old but has a light, almost floral taste which avoids the sweeter bourbon-esque flavours that so many of the distilleries seem to be moving towards in their mainstream bottles.
Rob Parsons on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

> ... don't a couple of the distillers still have their own maltings.

Of the Islay distilleries apart from Kilchoman, only Bowmore and Laphroaig malt on site. I assume, given the quantity of stuff being made, that they also buy in malt.
Post edited at 13:16
MarkJH - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:
> Bruicladdich were sourcing local barley and don't a couple of the distillers still have their own maltings. Kilchoman are great, I went there the year they released their first bottle, but they've nothing old yet.

Bruicladdich produced a limited amount of spirit from farmers who were contracted to grow scots bere (a traditional Scottish form of barley) , though I think much of it was grown in Orkney. Spirit (and harvest) yields were pretty awful, so them had to pay quite a lot for it, but the whisky is very nice. I think that they sent it away to be malted though.

A few of the distilleries still do floor malting, but they still buy in most of the malt, and they tend to only be the distilleries with visitors centres...
Post edited at 13:04
Jimbo C - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

+1 for Oban and Bunnahabhain
DR - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Scapa from Orkney do two single malts - Skiren and Glansa. Skiren has a beautiful sweet toffee flavour while Glansa is peated. Both lovely.

East Highland malt favourite is Glen Turret - really light and heathery taste. Dead hard to get hold of south of the border. Glendronach 12 yr old good too, 18 year old even better but about £70 I think.

Slainte,
Davie
Dave 88 - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Aberfeldy 12 is under rated and very nice.

Balvenie Double Wood is not under rated, for good reason!

Dalwhinnie 12 has a much stronger flavour than other un-peated offerings.

Craigellachie 13 is a bit different from others, quite full flavoured.

Tomintoul 10 or 12 are not very mainstream and have unique tastes.

I know you asked for single malt, but Ballentines and Chivas Regal are both good blends and therefore a bit cheaper.
TobyA on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
If money is an object, try Aldi's own brand single malt, under the Glen Marnoch name. I like their Islay one - very "Laphroigy", but their Speyside version won some supposedly big award! http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/aldi-whisky-world-best-ranking-glen-marnoch-s... I tried that too and enjoyed it. At 17.50 a bottle its a deal.
Post edited at 14:11
mik82 - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

How about going a bit off-piste and trying something like Paul John - Bold (Goan single malt)
keith-ratcliffe on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
All the supermarket chains do their 'own label' single malts. I have tried some of them and they aren't bad but I would love to know which distilleries they come from. Any inside knowledge on here?
MarkJH - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:
> All the supermarket chains do their 'own label' single malts. I have tried some of them and they aren't bad but I would love to know which distilleries they come from. Any inside knowledge on here?

I suspect that it the distillery will vary from batch to batch. They will buy up a load of casks that don't suit a particular distillery (for whatever reason) and make up their own single malt from that. The same casks that would otherwise go to blended malts or blended whisky.

I imagine that the price of being able to label it 'single malt' is less consistency in the product than you would get in a whisky that is sold as blended.
Post edited at 15:54
Malt_Loaf - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

Can't help you with inside knowledge. But I remember trying one that Sainsbury's had under their own brand a few years ago - it was excellent value.

Not sure if they still do it? or if it's still the same?
Doc Oc - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
You could do worse than a Japanese whiskey. I’d recommend one from the Yamasaki distillery.
climb41 on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

> Perfect - thanks for all the replies so far. I do seem to like the peaty smokey flavors a lot. There's a lot of Whisky's I find nice and would never turn one down but they don't stand out in terms of their flavors - Glenlivit a prime example. I think I prefer something that's unique and packs a punch.

If you like smoky flavours, obviously not a single malt, but I have been experimenting with various mezcals recently. The agave is roasted ( as opposed to steamed when making tequila) and therefore gives a smoky taste. Interesting, and I am also enjoying a lot of different aged tequilas.

JamieSparkes - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I can heartily recommend Longrow from Springbank in Campbeltown.
Bulls Crack - on 24 Nov 2017
In reply to Philip:

But it's not. The 2006 unpeated was a wonderful whisky. Later ones less so.

I like some peat but not to excess. Peat addition has become the hottest chilli's are best type syndrome. Eg Ledaig
Dave 88 - on 25 Nov 2017
In reply to Bulls Crack:

Couldnt agree more, it's become a bit of a pissing contest to say you like the peatiest whisky.
Big Ger - on 25 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Lagavulin for me, all day long.
1
Shani - on 25 Nov 2017
In reply to Big Ger:

> Lagavulin for me, all day long.

WE AGREE! The 16 obviously!
Big Ger - on 25 Nov 2017
In reply to Shani:
Nice to agree mate.


But I have I've asked for one nof these asa leaving gift from the service;

https://www.malts.com/en-au/our-whisky-collection/lagavulin/lagavulin-25-years-old/
Post edited at 22:47
Ffat Boi - on 26 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Celtic whiskey from Anglesey (bottled on Anglesey)

Lovely single malt

otherwise Oban

joan cooper on 26 Nov 2017
In reply to Kemics:

I liken it to a mouthful of TCP!!
scoobydougan - on 27 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

Laphroig still has it's own malting house, complete with mice, and smokes the malted barley over peat so confect that
MarkJH - on 27 Nov 2017
In reply to scoobydougan:

> Laphroig still has it's own malting house, complete with mice, and smokes the malted barley over peat so confect that

That is true, but what they can produce from their own maltings will only a proportion of the malt that they use (I would guess a very small proportion). They will still buy in most of what goes into the whisky.
shaymarriott - on 28 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Bowmore Small Batch is very good...
Malt_Loaf - on 28 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

I had a wee dram of Bowmore 12 in a bar at the weekend....tasty!

Update on Aberlour 12 - I liked it at first but after having a couple more glasses over the course of the last week or so I absolutely love the caramel/sweetness to it. It really is delightful and at £27 a bottle and absolute bargain - going to grab another for over Christmas! Would be very interested to try the 16/18yr expressions.

ML
NathanP - on 28 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Based on your really likes - all in my favourites too:
Lagavulin - a bit over budget but a bargain for such an outstanding whisky
Laphroaig Quarter Cask
Laphroaig 15yr
Ardbeg

Big Ger - on 29 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:
We did a bit of the old "fine dining" last week. With my cheese course I had an Ardbeg Corryvreckan.

https://www.ardbeg.com/en-GB/whisky/ultimate-range/corryvreckan

Not cheap, but well worth the punt.
Post edited at 02:16
Yanis Nayu - on 29 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Sarsons
tripehound - on 29 Nov 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Knockando
coinneach - on 29 Nov 2017
In reply to tripehound:

Auchentoshan American Oak . . . . . . delicious.

Asda

£22
aln - on 30 Nov 2017
tripehound - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Glen Morangie Portwood Finish.
Malt_Loaf - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

Checked out some of the suggestions and have purchased a bottle of Old Pulteney 12 and a bottle of Ardbeg 10 for over the Christmas period (was tempted to stretch to the Uigeadail but managed to get the 10 for £32 which seemed a great deal!!).

My fiancee hates heavily peated Whisky so I'm hoping the Old Pulteney will be a good compromise leaving the Ardbeg for me (yum!). Old Pulteney is a steel at £20 - hint of smoke and quite like the faint salty taste in it.

ML
Big Ger - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Malt_Loaf:

The wife bought me a whisky advent calendar, just because she's a wonderful woman like that.

https://www.masterofmalt.com/whiskies/drinks-by-the-dram/whisky-advent-calendar/

Day six now, no sparkling revelations so far, the Glenfraclas 25 yr old the nicest, the "That Boutiquey Whisky Irish single malt No. 1" the most interesting.

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