/ The Dangers of Bouldering - Squirrels & Birds

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ian Ll-J - on 30 Nov 2017
Just spotted this...

https://www.accidentadvicehelpline.co.uk/blog/article/the-dangers-of-bouldering/

Worth a read, who writes this stuff??

‘Other dangers of bouldering outdoors include people or animals accidentally knocking (or deliberately throwing – squirrels and birds can get quite aggressive when defending their territories) stones, sticks or other objects at you from above. Depending on where you are, there may also be a risk of insects, snakes or other wild animals; avalanches and even earthquakes.’
James Mann - on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

That is magic! Right I’m getting my claim in now. Climbing partners beware!

James
bouldery bits - on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

This website makes me sad.
Greasy Prusiks on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

There's an advert waiting to happen....

"Been injured bouldering and it wasn't your fault? Tom from Sheffield was awarded £7,000 after an irritable squirrel knocked him off Crescent Arete. You could be owed thousands."

Mark Kemball - on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to James Mann:

I there a website about the dangers of descent paths, James?
davidbeynon on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to Greasy Prusiks:

I'm sorry. You were only insured against injuries caused by squirrels.

The animal that bit through your rope was a tree rat.
James Mann - on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:
I am reading the small print. I found a section about no win, no fee for gear failure on the Culm Coast. I’ll forward it. Could be worth a few quid. I believe that the ancestor of the first person to record routes at the crag is held directly responsible. If that person cannot be traced, then it falls to the 1988 guidebook author. I believe this to be one and the same person. You might have his address and phone number. Don’t arrange a meeting though: He’ll probably be late.

James
Post edited at 22:11
mkean - on 30 Nov 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:
So if hypothetically someone were to claim for damages caused by a squirrel who would pay out; because the Dewerstone squirrel must be into the thousands of pounds by now?
jbrom - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Clicking through to the climbing wall section of that website lists common injuries as being cuts and bruises.

Seriously, who would claim for sustaining cuts and bruises whilst climbing?

I wonder if that could be tranfered to trad, grit would owe me a substantial pay out for the amount of skin lost over the years!
Ben_Climber - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to jbrom:

Americans?
I have heard of some brilliant/ridiculous claims being made.

I don't think the claim culture is as bad in the UK as it is over the pond.

duchessofmalfi - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Q who writes this stuff??

A Author: Paula Beaton endorsed by Esther Rantzen

This website makes me sad also
Bob Kemp - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to Ben_Climber:

> I don't think the claim culture is as bad in the UK as it is over the pond.

They're working on it... although this article suggests it's been around for a long time:
https://www.theguardian.com/money/blog/2011/jul/14/compensation-culture-personal-insurance-claims
GarethSL on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

A quick search on the website makes me die a little inside.

https://www.accidentadvicehelpline.co.uk/pages/?s=climbing

DerwentDiluted - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

A very uninformed piece of bollocks. A small amount of research would have found the biggest hazard faced by boulderers.

Frostbitten nipples.
ian Ll-J - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

> A quick search on the website makes me die a little inside.

I agree, it's a very sad culture.

This is the advice they give about Rock Climbing...

https://www.accidentadvicehelpline.co.uk/blog/article/dangers-rock-climbing/

‘Stunning views can distract you from your purpose, try and leave admiring the view until you reach your destination or stop in a safe place to get a glimpse to prevent tripping, slipping and falling.’


Bob Kemp - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Written by robot by the looks of it.
Dax H - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Bloody hell, I didn't realise climbing was so dangerous.
I think it's only wise to quit and take up platting cotton balls instead.
CasWebb - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Got to watch those squirrels. I was at a crag a few years back with friends when a squirrel dislodged a very large block from the top of the crag, easily big enough to kill somebody. We wouldn't have believed it either had we not seen the culprit scampering away. Think we may have had trouble catching him to sue him though.
Offwidth - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

I was nearly killed by a squirrel at the Lover's Leap campsite in California a few years back. A pine cone the size of a grapefruit that dropped ~10m missed my head by inches. I have no idea if there was intent (if we annoyed it) but the risks were all too real.
pebbles - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to Offwidth:

what about theft? I found an offset nut integrated into a jackdaws nest at brimham. I am now terrified that I will glance down at my bomber gear before committing, and spot a shifty lookimg jackdaw or magpie plucking at the triggers of my "thank god" cam
pebbles - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:
actually I'v just read the original link and am now absolutely fuming. I wish there was a comments section where I could vent my abuse at this bunch of ambulance chasing shysters at the inappropriateness of this blatent attempt to find a new source of easy money from the unprincipled or gullible.
Post edited at 12:32
pebbles - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:
From their website
"Should you have the bad fortune to be injured in a climbing accident through no fault on your part, there is a good chance that you could be entitled to make a personal injury claim"

    F*C K OFF you bunch of soul destroying, joy killing parasites



...and breathe....
Post edited at 12:37
Offwidth - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to pebbles:

A crow tried to steal our car keys at JT after pecking open the zip of our rucksack at the base of the crag. Luckily it settled for a sanitary pad instead, and the keys didn't fall down one of the many holes in the massive boulder field. Its funny now with hindsight but not at the time (like failed assassin squirrels).
Oceanrower - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

From the terrible website, "It is highly likely that you will be climbing with an instructor, especially if you are new to bouldering. This instructor must be qualified, competent and experienced enough to instruct you properly and assist you should the need arise."


Err, nope. No qualification required...
DerwentDiluted - on 01 Dec 2017
In reply to pebbles:

> what about theft? I found an offset nut integrated into a jackdaws nest at brimham.

I thought it was those naughty squirrels that hid nuts.
aln - on 02 Dec 2017
pebbles - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to Oceanrower:

right, well thats "taking a mate out " done away with then, if this lot get their snouts into the climbing injuries trough nobody will dare introduce a newbie to outdoor bouldering without a string of up to date qualifications and a disclaimer signed in triplicate and witnessed, formal pre -crag safety briefing, plus any area over 3 metres high roped off and marked up with warning notices.

alternatively maybe this bunch of numpties could keep their grubby paws away from activities they clearly know nothing about.
pasbury on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

> A quick search on the website makes me die a little inside.


you can probably make a claim for that.
cb294 - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to ian Ll-J:

Almost got knocked off balance by a dormouse that jumped from a hole and ran down the rock right next to my face on the Kleine Herkulessäule in Saxony. No idea who was more startled!

However, the most likely cause of death by rodent is of course Hantavirus associated kidney disease (transmitted via mouse droppings, especially in bivy huts in Scandinavia), or for extra style point plague (transmitted by chipmunks and their ilk in Colorado and Arizona).

Squirrels in the UK can actually carry leprosy, so better watch out!

CB

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