/ EUGSTER diagonal

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David Coley - on 04 Dec 2017
Hi,
any reason not to do this in winter (like it is avalanche prone, or it will be a metre deep in snow)?
Thanks.

D.


HeMa on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to David Coley:

Skiers coming down on ya?
Pete Houghton - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to David Coley:

Depending on the conditions, things on the north face of the Midi like the Mallory and the Eugster are still thought of as climbing routes in December, January, sometimes into February... but as soon as the first dump of slightly warmer snow starts sticking, they become ski descents.

That said, now that a growing number of skiers have chosen to think of these routes as mere training for some of the other things they like to entertain themselves with, you'll sometimes see people doing them on skis on the coldest, shortest, nastiest days of the winter, and end up rappelling well over half the route. Nothing wrong with that, of course.

In short, aim to do them earlier in the winter and you're less likely to encounter a difference of opinion from people heading in the other direction.

And, for the record, stay away from the Chevalier Couloir on the Petite Verte. These days it is a winter-long ski descent, not a climb.
J Whittaker - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to Pete Houghton:

Just curious here as a neutral bystander with no bias one way or the other. Who decides/is right as to wether a route is for climbing or skiing?

Maybe a slight bias as i am a fan of the wonder dog.
ed woods - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to J Whittaker:

No one ;) The only rule is common sense. Choose to climb when you might expect skiers from above? Your call...
Pete Houghton - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to J Whittaker:

The wonder dog appreciates your fandom. He is currently passed out on the sofa following yesterday's 1500m powder touring expedition, a quarter of a chicken, and a tin of sardines.

There is a general rule that the climber, or at least the downhill party, has the right of way, as they are more vulnerable to any actions taken by the skiing, or uphill party. But as Ed Woods says, common sense is the best way of deciding it, and decided it long before both teams find themselves shouting at each other...
If any skier brave enough to attempt the first repeat descent of Fil a Plomb were stupid enough to try it when the climbing conditions were perfect, and as such find two or three teams of justifiably-angry climbers on their scrape down, then they'd be in the wrong. Similarly, if any masochistic team of ice climbers, following a rare storm system capable of turning the route into a viable ski descent, were to feel like a long day of wading to, through, and from the route, back along the ridge to the Midi, they shouldn't really be surprised if some skier-spawned sluff were to add to the constant barage of natural spindrift they'd inevitably face on such a day.
This is just an example of course, and it's unlikely that there'd ever be such a conflict of interest on Fil a Plomb, a rarely-skied route, but there have been and will continue to be these encounters on similar routes. Anyone trying to climb the Mallory on a perfect skiing day has no real right to complain to the four or five teams that might pass them, though the first couple of teams might like to share a few choice words with the later skiers that follow them.
Misha - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to Pete Houghton:

Fil a Plomb has been skied?!?!
Pete Houghton - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to Misha:

> Fil a Plomb has been skied?!?!

I know, nuts isn't it?
Mikko Heimonen and Jesper Petersson, three years ago I think. Making use of a series of shelves to looker's left of the lower pitches, instead of the actual ice. But clean skiing higher up.
HeMa on 04 Dec 2017
Misha - on 04 Dec 2017
In reply to Pete Houghton:

Wow...

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