/ roaches 3 pocket slab and chalk

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mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
a walk up to the roaches at dinner time and I came across a sight which seems now to be acceptable by some.
if the rock is wet go home, covering the rock with chalk does not help. it looks horrible and climbing on wet rock only adds to the issue of corrosion.
ive had a good sized break from climbing and some of the things I'm coming back to are not the things I remember

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcXT6HWl4Aq/?taken-by=shably74
Smelly Fox - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:
Good on you for posting this Mark.

Incidentally when I was there the other day, The Bobba Fett slab was pretty clarted. Unfortunately I have no pics, but a can’t imaging chalk has a very beneficial effect on those tenuous smears...
Skip - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

Chalk is used far too much in general. It really doesn't make that much difference, unless your hands are particularly sweaty/greasy.
Jon Greengrass on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

I've not climbed outside in a decade, but judging by the state of the local walls within a day of new problems being set I'm not suprised this is what happens when the muppets climb outside.
mrphilipoldham - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

The last logbook entry from the third is a telling tale.. “very wet”

Why try and climb it then?!
kipman725 - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:
Chalk may not be aesthetically pleasing but it helps kill our enemy; the lichen.
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to kipman725:

not where there is nothing there to kill.
it doesn't matter if the people who did it had to travel from Southampton,the rock is wet. go to the wall
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

good work

exactly
Ben_Gilbert96 - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

I bet they used friction labs chalk as well and had their hats on backwards, bloody indoor boulderers
In reply to mark s:
Hi Mark,

Funnily enough we're publishing an article on this very topic over the next few days.

Every single time I go out these days I seem to see something crazy, hence rather than just publish a single article we've got an entire series coming out on best practise. In addition to this we'll be promoting the cause on our social media channels using the handle #respecttherock.

I've also started a new UKC Gallery where you can upload your horror stories. Various members of the UKC Team have already contributed, but feel free to do so yourself - we'll be doing a prize draw for every month. What I might encourage is for people to do a before/after shot, simply so that we're encouraging people to clean up after themselves (or 'others').

Here's a link: https://www.ukclimbing.com/photos/?category=41
Post edited at 17:12
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

andi mentioned you had spoke to him.
people certainly need educating. I saw a link via twitter about the commandments of looking after the crags and chalk was mentioned in that
Gordon Stainforth - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

I haven't been climbing for a decade, but hope most climbers are now using chalk balls rather than loose chalk ? ?
mrphilipoldham - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

I don't want to be presumptuous but I'm going to guess the disliker is the climber in question..
mrphilipoldham - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

Wish I'd taken a picture of the jugs on the The Buckstone Dyno (f7B) yesterday now!
steveriley - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

That may be true but chalk balls also make a handy dab-ball for the partially sighted, deluded and ignorant to spray their territory with abandon. I can only think people don't realise this is A Bad Thing and have become divorced from respect and common sense. Unless they're nutjobs that is.
Carl on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

Presumptuous in this case, I did not dislike the post.
Looking back on it, it was clearly the wrong thing to do - a weekend of frustrating weather leads to poor decisions, and I should have left it well alone. In the future, I'll suck it up and head for a walk or to the pub.
Alex Hallam - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

Should have just asked if they could borrow my blow torch and wire brush....
mrphilipoldham - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Carl:

Fair enough, and thumbs up for the hands up!
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Carl:

Respect for owning up.

Doff my cap
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

> I don't want to be presumptuous but I'm going to guess the disliker is the climber in question..

No someone else who posted in the thread I think
Skip - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Skip:

> Chalk is used far too much in general. It really doesn't make that much difference, unless your hands are particularly sweaty/greasy.

Three dislikes for this post. I'm interested in why. I hardly ever use chalk, really only when my hands are sweaty (even then a good wipe on my trousers generally suffices) or the rock is particularly greasy. Not using chalk has made no difference at all, indoor or outdoor.
WillRhodes - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

Ah, 'twas you whom I bumped into on the carpark then, during your departure - declaring the rock damp - I presume?

Trad stuff seemed dry, the wind I guess.
Can imagine the boulders would be much worse though.
mark s - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to WillRhodes:

Yes the trees on the lower tier have a habit of creating mist on days like this. Hopefully the dry forecast will make for some nice but cold conditions over the weekend
mrchewy - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Skip:

I haven't disliked the post but just because you don't notice a difference using chalk doesn't mean I don't. That could be down to more than being naturally sweaty or in my case, issues with my ability to control my sweat response due to disease and the resulting brain operation.
I personally see no reason for chalking footholds, it seems lazy to me - if friction is the issue, clean your shoes until they squeak. If you really can't see the hold, then the smallest tick mark will work and clean up better than some one foot monstrosity that's not easily brushed.
andi turner - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:
Thinknits fair to say that someone leading a route is quite different to someone having multiple attempts on a problem.
Jon Stewart - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to Skip:

For many or most people it makes holds feel much gripper. So many or most people will disagree with you.
Lion Bakes on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

Disgusting , chalk should be kept for indoors.

snoop6060 - on 06 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

I dunno what's worse. Excessive chalk or hash tags and Instagram. I'm torn
Stroppy - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Ben_Gilbert96:
Can you wear a beanie backwards?
Stroppy - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Jon Greengrass:

Totally agree - climbing should be restricted to only those who know the rules, and ideally only people who have already been climbing for many years
mrteale - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

Hopefully the article will include a good discussion of the perils of overbrushing too though Rob, which is at the other end of the spectrum but degrades holds. More people need educating in the ways of the whipping beer towel.
In reply to mrteale:

Funnily enough that’s a big part of the article too.

Dan Varian has kindly written a few ‘commandments’ on the topic, as it’s something he is a very firm believer in. That said, I think anyone who’s climbed at Bowden is probably a firm believer in it too - the erosion is all too obvious! It’s one thing brushing granite or limestone, it’s another thing brushing a very soft sandstone (or even harder sandstone or grit for that matter).

johncook - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

No one has mentioned my input! The unpaid hours I have spent on minus wall a stoney with my pledge and beeswax keeping the holds in pristine polished condition, then along come all these guys in beenies and tee shirts, scrub off all that wax patina and cover the entire wall with chalk. Ruins the effect of the polished marble bank foyer look!
(I really mean to say that there is so much chalk on this wall that it is almost impossible to tell what rock it is made of!)
On another thread I suggested that different coloured chalks could be used. Pick a colour for a problem and only use that colour on that problem and so make it easier for the newly transferred indoor boulderer to see how to get up the problem!
I would like to put an imoji here but being a pre-techno old fart I don't know how to!
krikoman - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

> The last logbook entry from the third is a telling tale.. “very wet”

> Why try and climb it then?!

Why put loads of chalk on it and try to climb it might be a better question. By all means have a go but, leave the chalk out eh?
mrphilipoldham - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to krikoman:

Isn't grit known to be weaker, and therefore more prone to damage, when it's wet?
Adam Long - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

The Roaches does tend to attract the idiots. I remember some years ago a guy poured a bottle of bleach down the crag! Beggars belief doesn't it?
krikoman - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

> Isn't grit known to be weaker, and therefore more prone to damage, when it's wet?

A very good point, we presented.
In reply to Adam Long:

I might use that anecdote within one of the forthcoming articles. Whilst it may seem obvious not to pour bleach down the wall, apparently nothing is obvious anymore...

Following on a similar theme, two 'favourites' of mine that have been reported recently are of climbers walking to Almscliffe ALONG THE WALL so to avoid getting their feet muddy on the path and a boulderer at Brimham trying to break the bottle top off of their beer on a hold.

When the latter was approached they were actually defensive, as they claimed it was more likely to do damage to the bottle - not the hold.

This is what we're dealing with...



mal_meech on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

> This is what we're dealing with...

Muppets...
Dave Garnett - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Adam Long:

> The Roaches does tend to attract the idiots. I remember some years ago a guy poured a bottle of bleach down the crag! Beggars belief doesn't it?

Was that what caused the bare streaks on the left of the Upper Tier over by Libra? I did wonder, but discounted it as too improbable.

andi turner - on 07 Dec 2017
In reply to Dave Garnett:

Never been sure what caused those streaks. I imagine its something in the ground leaching onto the rock surface rather than a one off pollutant.
Steve Halfpenny - on 08 Dec 2017
In reply to Stroppy:

Wow that a pretty arrogant comment
Offwidth - on 08 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

Well done for calling this out.

More climbers need to read articles like this:

https://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=9892
dabble on 08 Dec 2017
In reply to Steve Halfpenny:

The joke.


















Your head.
Chris Harris - on 08 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:
It gets worse. Some people are painting coloured lines & the number of the route on the rock.

https://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=303019
Post edited at 13:25
Alex the Alex on 08 Dec 2017
In reply to Chris Harris:

Aye thats not on either. Perhapse the respect the rock article should make mention of only using coloured string/cord for marking lines in such photos?
descender8 - on 09 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

They should be shamed named then embarrassed - I'm embarrassed to be a climber seeing that I loose hope !
descender8 - on 09 Dec 2017
In reply to Carl:

No excuses - be ashamed !
Steve Halfpenny - on 09 Dec 2017
In reply to dabble:

I'm sorry im not with you on this hilarious comment. Why should climbing outside be restricted to people who have been climbing for many years?
mrphilipoldham - on 09 Dec 2017
In reply to Steve Halfpenny:

I think that there was a certain amount of tongue buried in cheek..
Goucho on 09 Dec 2017
In reply to mark s:

Back in the mid 70's, and much to the annoyance of the Peak District mafia - otherwise known as Crags Magazine - Ken Wilson made a valid comment regarding chalk, after John Allen's first free ascent of Great Wall on Cloggy.

Unfortunately, because the article was preceeded - in typical Ken style - by a provocative and controversial headine, the context was lost (or more likely deliberately ignored) but I've always thought he was onto something when he said this....

"Chalk may well be necessary on the few crucial crux moves, but there is no excuse for powdering a white stripe up the middle of the finest wall in Wales".






Ollie Keynes on 09:16 Mon
In reply to andi turner:

All leaders get up all routes first go?
mrphilipoldham - on 11:01 Mon
In reply to Ollie Keynes:

Not all obviously, but the vast majority. I’m sure you could collate the required evidence from the logbook graphs on here, I bet it’s 95% plus.
Ollie Keynes on 16:58 Mon
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

Maybe you don't sport climb...
mrphilipoldham - on 17:10 Mon
In reply to Ollie Keynes:
I don’t. But then neither does anyone on the rock type in question!

Edit - Apart from at the delightful New Mills, with it's bolted viaduct.
Post edited at 17:18
andi turner - on 11:02 Tue
In reply to Ollie Keynes:

As a development coach, I'd expect you'd be able to differentiate between red-pointing a sport climb, leading a trad route and trying to dry a wet problem with chalk. Perhaps the biggest issue is that some people are trying to beat problems (or routes) into submission rather than coming back to them when they are better at climbing. The fact that this is then happening on wet days highlights this even more; I mean how many times do you need to try something before deciding it might be best to come back on a dry day?
paul mitchell - on 11:17 Tue
In reply to mark s:
The usual pompous blathering re chalk.
Indeed,wet rock would indicate that chalk would make no odds.So what.
But that very same wetness shows how easily said chalk washes off.

To repeat,chalk washes off....get a life.

Judgemental s---,as usual.
Post edited at 11:18
Ollie Keynes on 09:40 Wed
In reply to andi turner:

Have you seen this little film?
https://www.ukclimbing.com/videos/play.php?i=1028
;)
andi turner - on 14:27 Wed
In reply to Ollie Keynes:
Yes, but I don't see what your point is?

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