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Mountain Literature Classics: Walking with Jane Austen

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It is a truth universally acknowledged, that no young woman, of eighteen or twenty summers, may attain the rôle of heroine in Miss Austen's novels without a keen appreciation of country walks. Ronald Turnbull examines the evidence. 

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 heleno 25 Aug 2022
In reply to UKC/UKH Articles:

Really enjoyed this article thank you! 🙂 

The quote "What are men to rocks and mountains?" has been a favourite of mine since I first read P&P as a teenager. 

 simoninger 12 Sep 2022
In reply to UKC/UKH Articles:

Here in Bath it's the Jane Austen Festival this week. A yomp over the Mendips isn't in the programme, oddly enough. 

In reply to UKC/UKH Articles:

Jane Austen? Really? You are using a very elastic definition of "Mountain Literature"!

May I humbly suggest sharing your thoughts on Ralph Barker's "The Last Blue Mountain"?

(PS I enjoy dipping into "Granite and Grit" - marvellous!)

 Pedro50 20:54 Tue
In reply to UKC/UKH Articles:

I've never read any Austen but the Rachel Parris comedy on R4 at 6.30 this evening was excellent and almost made me think I might give her a go. 

In reply to Pedro50:

I've read all of Jane Austen's books (*), her portrayals of "people" she disapproves of are brilliant, polite but incredibly cutting so that you sometimes have to read them twice to be sure that she really is having a good go at them.

(*) - actually over the years I think I've now read them all twice (except the unfinished ones like Sandition, but P&P probably 3 or 4 times), and unlike the OP, Northanger Abbey is the one I least like.


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