UKC

VIDEO: Packing for Sport Climbing

New Topic
This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 UKC Articles 06 Dec 2021

Rob Greenwood talks through what he would pack for a day of sport climbing. He explains, in detail, what equipment will be needed and why, plus gives a few tips from his experience.

Read more

5
In reply to UKC Articles:

Would you not take a daisy chain, sling or Petzl adjust type thing with you for re-threading? I would have thought that would be fairly vital bit of kit in a sport climbing bag?

24
 1poundSOCKS 06 Dec 2021
In reply to Ben_Climber:

> I would have thought that would be fairly vital bit of kit in a sport climbing bag?

I just use quickdraws.

1
 Kevster 06 Dec 2021
In reply to 1poundSOCKS:

Me too. Or a second if I'm feeling too waddish to thread and retrieve my gear. 

1
In reply to UKC Articles:

Ok, but you've forgotten the snacks.

In reply to Ben_Climber:

> Would you not take a daisy chain, sling or Petzl adjust type thing with you for re-threading?

Nope, they're only used by 6a+ struggling punters. Like me. Rob's far too hardcore to need such beginner kit! 

Does anyone else enjoy putting Rob on 1.5 or even 1.75 speed so he sounds like a gear-guru chipmunk? Well, it amuses me.

 PaulJepson 06 Dec 2021
In reply to UKC Articles:

Don't forget your brush and a 17mm/19mm spanner!

I don't want to see tick-marks, holds caked in chalk, or 10 different comments in the logbook route feedback saying the third bolt is loose. 

1
In reply to UKC Articles:

WE always take an adjustable sling for rethreading  by last climber up. Kong make a brilliant device for this , chap and v easy to use . Wouldnt leave home without it.

1
 Will Hunt 07 Dec 2021
In reply to UKC Articles:

Oh dear, oh dear. Not much room left for the portable fingerboard, two kneepads, flask, clipstick, rolls of fingertape, two different types of chalk, skin recovery balm, Bluetooth surround sound system, training diary, and a copy of The Inspirational Quotes of Adam Ondra.

 Andy Hardy 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Will Hunt:

Or pies.

In reply to TobyA:

Well if you are sports climbing and working a route, then a daisy chain is incredibly useful. Very handy for hanging off bolts etc when working a route.So its not really beginners kit.

Post edited at 12:48
16
In reply to TobyA:

>  Does anyone else enjoy putting Rob on 1.5 or even 1.75 speed so he sounds like a gear-guru chipmunk? Well, it amuses me.

I've just tried that and that's the speed he normally talks at. I think they slowed him down for the video

 PaulJepson 07 Dec 2021
In reply to neilh:

For clarity, you mean going in hard to the bolts in order to clip-stick your way up? Not actually clipping a static lanyard into bolts to then fall on to?

1
 Adam Lincoln 07 Dec 2021
In reply to neilh:

> Well if you are sports climbing and working a route, then a daisy chain is incredibly useful. Very handy for hanging off bolts etc when working a route.So its not really beginners kit.

Or just use a quickdraw like everyone else. Maybe its the venues i climb at but in Yorkshire i've never seen anyone using a daisy chain. Ever...

2
 Will Hunt 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Adam Lincoln:

To be fair there are virtually no lower-offs that need rethreading at Malham and Kilnsey so no need to carry one anyway.

In reply to neilh:

I was at least 50% joking, but actually daisy chains (the old type) seem a really bad idea as it's totally static and cross clipping the pockets is a known way of causing accidents. I've got one of the old Beal single Dynaloops - which is slightly dynamic so doesn't put you at quite the same risk of breaking your harness or internal organs if you somehow managed to fall directly onto it. I just larks foot it onto my belay loop and clip the other end to a back gear loop, it doesn't get too much in the way. A mate has one of the Petzl adjustable leashes which seem to work great but it's quite a big bit of 10 mm rope to have attached to your harness and clipped round the back. I can see why lots of people just make sure they have a couple of spare QDs to clip in with. Even in the dodgy Peak quarries I frequent for easier sport climbing more and more lower offs are equipped with insitu krabs to use making leashes/cowstails pretty redundant when you just need to clip to finish the route.

 PaulJepson 07 Dec 2021
In reply to TobyA:

If it's all loweroff rings then you don't really need anything either, as you can just clip into a QD and thread a bite through. I sometimes climb at crags that have shonky loweroffs, which are often just some rusty maillons. In those scenarios it's nice to have a couple of things you can get 'safe' on the bolts with (I use a Kong Slyde). We're not all lucky enough to live near Gary! 

 abarro81 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Will Hunt:

Two kneepads? Ha. You're worse than the daisychain punters. Kneepads are the new shoes - 2 pairs minimum, and that's for going fast and light... 

1
In reply to Adam Lincoln:

You see the technique being used alot by local climbers in Spain for working routes. 
 

I have been shown it by Spanish climbers who wondered why I was not using a daisy chain . so picked the habit up from them.
 

I agree it’s not used alot in U.K.  But does not mean it’s useful.   

3
In reply to Ben_Climber:

> Would you not take a daisy chain, sling or Petzl adjust type thing with you for re-threading? I would have thought that would be fairly vital bit of kit in a sport climbing bag?

I've always used quickdraws and have found them to be perfectly adequate. Both systems have the potential to be misused, so it's worth being aware of the limitations. In short: when re-threading a lower off, never commit yourself to untying whilst clipped in to a single piece of gear, always use a back-up (i.e. both bolts within the lower off).

Lanyards come into their own whilst multi-pitch sport climbing, where they make the belays quick and easy to setup. For single pitch climbing, they're exclusively of use when re-threading a lower-off, but all-in-all seem like a bit of an unnecessary luxury, as a quickdraw just seems easier to use - plus you'll be carrying them anyway.

All that said, when it comes to daisy chains vs. slings vs. lanyards, I'd take a lanyard every day (whilst sport climbing). Daisy chains are - I think it's fair to say - shite and slings lack the ability to adjust, which in/of itself brings about several fairly major safety issues.

In reply to Will Hunt:

> Oh dear, oh dear. Not much room left for the portable fingerboard, two kneepads, flask, clipstick, rolls of fingertape, two different types of chalk, skin recovery balm, Bluetooth surround sound system, training diary, and a copy of The Inspirational Quotes of Adam Ondra.

I can't help but feel that we need a sport climbing follow-up to the 'Bouldering Essentials' article I wrote a few years ago: https://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/climbing/bouldering_mats/rob_greenwoods_bouldering_essentials-9952

As Barrows said though: only heathens carry two knee pads

In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

> I can't help but feel that we need a sport climbing follow-up to the 'Bouldering Essentials' article I wrote a few years ago: https://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/climbing/bouldering_mats/rob_greenwoods_bouldering_essentials-9952

Oh dear, I see I made the same gag 4 years ago. Crikey I'm dull.

In reply to steveriley:

> Oh dear, I see I made the same gag 4 years ago. Crikey I'm dull.

It's just a testament to how strongly you feel about snacks, and in my eyes that's no bad thing - plus (in your defence) I did forget to mention them within each article + video!

 Adam Lincoln 08 Dec 2021
In reply to neilh:

> You see the technique being used alot by local climbers in Spain for working routes. 

>  

> I have been shown it by Spanish climbers who wondered why I was not using a daisy chain . so picked the habit up from them.

>  

> I agree it’s not used alot in U.K.  But does not mean it’s useful.   

I see it used more by lower grade climbers. 6's and low 7's. Certainly never seen anyone doing it climbing 8's and 9's. As whats the point when a quickdraw or two works just as well. Plus quick draws don't get in the way at back of harness, whereas a lanyard will be on belay loop and be bulky. 

In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

> I can't help but feel that we need a sport climbing follow-up to the 'Bouldering Essentials' article I wrote a few years ago: https://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/climbing/bouldering_mats/rob_greenwoods_bouldering_essentials-9952

What about "Packing for the Wall"? How can I continue to train in the meantime without it?

1
In reply to Adam Lincoln:

I understand that, but I was surprised to see it being widely used on upper 7s and low 8s' there. They just told me they found it more practical when working routes as the chain can be adjusted far easier etc etc. than messing around with quickdraws.

They certainly left the daisy chain on the ground when not working the route as it was then a pain( as you say too bulky etc)

Just interesting how different people view these things.

 heleno 08 Dec 2021
In reply to TobyA:

>  A mate has one of the Petzl adjustable leashes which seem to work great but it's quite a big bit of 10 mm rope to have attached to your harness and clipped round the back. 

I used to think the same until a friend lent me one to try, and I liked it so much I bought my own.  I've been using it throughout a 2-month trip to France and haven't ever found it bulky or intrusive.

Nearly everyone in France seems to use one - so much so that the standard call when clipped into the anchors is is "vaché".

In reply to Robert Durran:

> What about "Packing for the Wall"? How can I continue to train in the meantime without it?

 Be careful what you wish for

Post edited at 12:15
 rachelpearce01 08 Dec 2021
In reply to neilh:

Actually we’ve noticed in Leonidio that nearly every other person has a petzl connect. I also don’t really see the point of them but have noticed they’ve become really popular. 

1
In reply to heleno:

I live in france and my friends who use them climb 7b absolute max, and it holds them back for its bulk and goofiness. Everyone uses quickdraws. 

2
In reply to AtLargesse:

I just use a 120cm sling halved and larksfooted to my belay loop (with a screw gate on the loose end).

I've never had an issue with it getting in the way and puts me close enough to the anchor that rethreading is a breeze. It's a piece of kit that just migrates between my sport and trad rack. Cheap to replace too

1
In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

I am about to move house and I really could do with some help if you are free. 

1

New Topic
This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Loading Notifications...