UKC

NEWS: UPDATE: Ty Landman On Smiling Buttress FA

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 UKC News 02 Dec 2013
Tyler Landman, 4 kb

At the beginning of November, Ty Landman made the coveted first ascent of Smiling Buttress at Curbar. First made famous in Hard Grit, it had been tried by Ben Moon and Steve McClure, amongst others, but no-one had got close to climbing the route until Ty returned a month ago. 



Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=68545
 madmats 02 Dec 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Isn't it at Frogatt, not Curbar?

Either way, sterling effort and when can we see the video?!
In reply to madmats:

>Isn't it at Frogatt, not Curbar?

No, in a word.

jcm
 The Pylon King 02 Dec 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Surely not giving this a grade is like running a race and breaking some sort of record but not telling anyone what the actual time was?

IMHO

Weird - maybe it was just VS in the end?
In reply to The Pylon King:

> Surely not giving this a grade is like running a race and breaking some sort of record but not telling anyone what the actual time was?

But he isn't the first to do it.

Samson at Burbage South - never graded by Jerry M
Elder Statesman at Curbar - given XS 7b by Ste Mac
Doctor Dolittle at Curbar - given H9 7a by John Arran

There are probably others as well.

Alan
 TimB 03 Dec 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:

> Surely not giving this a grade is like running a race and breaking some sort of record but not telling anyone what the actual time was?


More like the actions of someone who really, really loves running, and likes pushing themself to run as fast as they can but can't be bothered with doing races to compete against other runners. IMO.
Franz the Stampede 03 Dec 2013
In reply to UKC News:

"I think an important part of climbing is figuring out what the sport means to you, and where and how it fits into your life. This in turn dictates where your expectations should lie."

Great words of wisdom...
In reply to Franz the Stampede:

That struck me as a slightly curious observation, at least when allied to his other comment that now he was working full time he expected to climb just as hard as when he was climbing full time (an unlikely proposition in my view, but we'll see). It would seem that on the contrary TL's own experience/expectations suggest that where the sport fits into your life shouldn't actually dictate where your expectations lie.

jcm
 Michael Gordon 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Maybe a slight risk of 'burn out' when climbing full time?
In reply to Michael Gordon:

Well, maybe. But in general full-time athletes perform better than part time ones, and it's hard to see why climbing should be different.

jcm
 TimB 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Because the full-time climbers lifestyle is actually detrimental to athletic performance?
 John Gillott 03 Dec 2013
In reply to TimB:

I wonder how important it is if your focus is bouldering and you have a natural talent for short powerful & technical climbing? Just how many hours a day and how many days a week can you boulder / train?
 UKB Shark 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

From a training perspective power/strength which is more important for bouldering lends itself to short intense sessions with reasonable rest between sessions so better suited to fit around other commitments. IIRC a beast like Jan Hojer said he only trained 16 hours a week. Compare that to a world class route or comp climber like Patxi. The limiting factor will likely more come down to getting on actual rock - and the more you do that the better for getting lucky on conditions and capitalising on runs of good form. One way round even this is to take the Gaskins approach of remodelling projects on your board and narrowly focussing your training.
In reply to shark:

I wonder how much training world-class weightlifters do?

jcm
 Ian W 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

They "train" all day, every day, but because their sport involves very short bursts of explosive strength allied to split second timing and technique, their training will reflect this. i.e. not much weightlifting at max capacity, but a lot of technique practice (engrams). Their whole lifestyle is built around the requirements of thier sport, so you could argue that the diet, sleep and recovery sessions (sleep) are just as important as pumping iron in the gym.
In reply to Ian W:

Exactly. Well, which part of that doesn't apply to bouldering?

jcm
DaveDaveDave 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Don't forget climbing is also a mental battle. Having no expectations of yourself, of pressure to perform, can allow you to climb better than if it was your main goal.
In reply to DaveDaveDave:

>Don't forget climbing is also a mental battle.

Isn't any sport?

jcm
DaveDaveDave 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Yes, I didn't claim no other sport was. It is applicable to all.
 1poundSOCKS 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously: Maybe Tyler is saying if he was a full time climber, he'd be even better than he is now. His expectations are therefore lower because he's not doing it full time.

In reply to 1poundSOCKS:

Well, no, he says "I don’t think this change has had an impact on what I am capable of doing. If anything, it may have made me better."

jcm
 1poundSOCKS 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously: I guess he just likes to look on the bright side if things then.

Franz the Stampede 03 Dec 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:
I might be wrong, but I get the feeling that Tyler's days as a fulltime climber followed the "I just climbing on rock and hang out with my friends" style. Haven't seen Between the Trees, but I remember Dosage V, he was in the Ozarks and it all looked pretty relaxed.

So, I wouldn't be surprised if he managed to keep that level (or even increase it) by "climbing around" less while, conversely, training intensively and in a structured way more. He's obviously very talented and he was starting from a pretty damn good point. Plus he probably doesn't need to train endurance as much (whilst it's a must for competition lead climbers, for instance), which probably cuts the time needed for training drastically.

Either way, I'm happy to seem him in the headlines, he is one of my very favourite British climbers.
Post edited at 20:07
 steveriley 23 Dec 2013
Now on the telly at http://tv.thebmc.co.uk/
In reply to SteveRi:

Amazing
 1poundSOCKS 23 Dec 2013
In reply to SteveRi: Strange how it says Font 8a/b at the end. 8a+?


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Loading Notifications...