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/ Building a climbing wall on the outside wall of my house

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L katiecat on 10 Jan 2018
Can anyone tell me whether there are any regulations or restrictions on building a climbing wall on the outside of my house? It's a semi detached house and the wall is on the side of the house next to my driveway, 8m high and visible from the neighbouring property.
flour - on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to katiecat:

Difficult to see why this should be a problem if you are just bolting holds to the side of your house. You can always ask your local building inspector through the local council.
cragtyke on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to katiecat:

If it's a newbuild leasehold house be careful that you don't breach the terms of your lease, my daughter's house in Sheffield has a variety of restrictions relating to what can and can't be fastened to the house as a result of this scam.
JendeHoxar on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to katiecat:

I think you have to have it fenced off with a notice up telling the public they they aren't allowed to climb on it, otherwise if someone falls off and hurts themselves, I've heard you could be liable, even if the climbing holds are on private property (your house). Heard this second hand though, so can't promise it's accurate information.
Oceanrower - on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to JendeHoxar:

If you don't know, why bother posting?
dave657 on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to Oceanrower:

If that was the rule, this forum would be very quiet.
Oceanrower - on 10 Jan 2018
In reply to dave657:

But, hopefully, a damn sight more accurate.
Trangia on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to cragtyke:

> If it's a newbuild leasehold house be careful that you don't breach the terms of your lease, my daughter's house in Sheffield has a variety of restrictions relating to what can and can't be fastened to the house as a result of this scam.

Why do you say "scam"?

Sounds like a very sensible clause, even more so on a Leasehold building of apartments, so as to ensure some form of uniformity in appearance. Near where my daughter lives in Winchester there is a newly constructed leashold housing estate here there is a trick planting clause relating to what can or cannot be planted in the gardens, what colour paint (right down to BS Nos) can be used on outside woodwork, doors and windows. The whole estate is starting to look really nice as it matures. Such covenants are much easier to enforce on Leasehold than on Freeholds, which is to the advantage of all residents.

Of course if you don't like the covnants you have the choice not to buy in the first place

pasbury on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to Trangia:

> Why do you say "scam"?

 

He probably means the general scam of new build leaseholds with potentially spiralling ground rent costs. Now banned.

 

cragtyke on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to pasbury:

Yes, it's not just the question of ground rents, but the extortionate charges to buy the freehold, and restrictions such as the need to consult with the agents and have a site inspection carried out, for a fee of £200, if you wish to put a 6 x 4 shed in your garden, or a pir spotlight.

 

cragtyke on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to Trangia:


> Of course if you don't like the covnants you have the choice not to buy in the first place

True, but this scam is just taking advantage of the fact that for many people , buying newbuilds under the govt's equity loan scheme is the only way to be able to get enough deposit together to be able to buy, rather than renting.

The fact that leaseholds on housing are due to be banned by the current government in England suggests that they are indeed a scam.

mouseliveson - on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to katiecat:

Yes there are restrictions building something that large in fact. Generally if you wish to build something in your garden that is further than 5m away from your house is treated as an 'outbuilding', if not it may be treated as an 'extension'. Outhouses can be built without any planning permission (generally) as can extensions if they comply with given parameters. This is known as 'Permitted Development'. You can search for information on this on the Planning Portal online.

It sounds like at 8m you are way out of your Permitted Development rights and that the structure may be treated as an extension, in which case you may need to apply for planning permission. Though I might also mention that if you agree with your neighbours and it is hidden from any public streets, you may get away with it though it will be largely at risk of having to be taken down if spotted by the council or other regulatory body.

 

As other have mentioned it is worth considering whether there are any covenants on your land or clauses in your leasehold contract (if relevant) that may restrict you from building something like that should you wish to go ahead with applying for permission. In each borough there are exceptions to these general guidelines so I'd recommend checking with your Local Planning Authority.

Trangia on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to cragtyke:

But you were calling covenants as to what you can or cannot do to the outer wall of a house a scam, which they aren't because they benefit all the householders. Escalating ground rents are an entirely different matter and have nothing to do with this thread about building a climbing wall! So not a scam in this context.

pec on 11 Jan 2018
In reply to katiecat:

If its just bolting some holds to the existing wall then I don't think it should be an issue but if it involves any construction then I'd say it almost certainly would be a planing issue given the 8m height involved.

It would probably be classed as an outbuilding and there's some guidance here

https://interactive.planningportal.co.uk/mini-guide/outbuildings/0

Of course you could just build it anyway as planning enforcement in this country is apallingly lax and the worst that can happen is you will be told to take it down, though I'd see what the neighbours think before going down that route as they are the most likely ones to complain to the planning deptment if they don't like it.

 


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