/ Hanging a fingerboard in a van?? Please help!

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Joe Wenman - on 08 Mar 2019

Hey all,

I want to find a way to install a fingerboard into my VW T5 Van, and am struggling to find a solution. 

I need it to be removable, so my family can enter and exit without banging heads, etc, but also secure enough to workout on properly. 

Can anyone help? 

Thanks!

Joe

www.joewenman.com

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ianstevens - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Going from your blog, I'd suggest if you're falling off 5a sport you need to go climbing more rather than use a fingerboard anywhere.

To actually answer your question, I'd get a portable hangboard (such as a Problemsolver, you'd get the most out of an XL at those grades) that you can hang on a tree/crag/monkey bar etc. rather than sticking something on your van. 

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climbercool - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to ianstevens:

I'd say a fingerboard can be suitable for improving from any level, I've known many climbers who have climbed regularly for years and years and never got past 6b,  I have never met a climber who regularly uses a fingerboard and cant climb 6b. Ben

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climbercool - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

If you are creative often you don't need a fingerboard, I lived in a van for a couple of months last year and I would train by opening the sliding door and either holding on to the roof (good open handed grip) or crimping the rail just above the sliding door whilst my feet were in the van.  I also had a postion in the van which involved hanging off the upstairs bed area.  Ben

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jkarran - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

I'm struggling a bit to envisage how you plan to use it in a van and frankly why.

Padded hooks made from sturdy metal flat bar to pick up roof rails spring to mind as an idea if you plan to use it sitting in the side door.

jk

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MJAngry on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Watch Free Solo - all the answers are in there. 

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ianstevens - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to jkarran:

> I'm struggling a bit to envisage how you plan to use it in a van and frankly why.

for the gram #content

Post edited at 15:51
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MischaHY - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Literally 2 seconds of googling took to me to this link which explains that gutter mounts are the way to go: https://www.mountainproject.com/forum/topic/113176389/alex-megos-hangboard-mount-on-van 

A few extra pointers: 

1) Show, don't tell. 

2) Superlatives - just say no. 

3) Product placement and affiliate marketing thinly veiled as 'recommended kit' tears any credibility to shreds. Referring to said product placement as 'a real game changer for me'  or similar cookie cutter fad marketing phrases only serves to scatter the pieces to the wind. 

You need to spend way more time thinking through how your content can offer value to readers and not to yourself. Monetising a strong media platform is great and can be a rewarding way to spend your time, but you have to start with the media, not with the money.

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nikoid - on 08 Mar 2019
In reply to MischaHY:

I just had a look at his blog- hilarious.

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cragtyke on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Get out on the edge and go and explore Halfords.

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thebigfriendlymoose - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to nikoid:

I read it and assumed it was a spoof - Nathan Barley goes climbing - "a self-facilitating media node" makes hard work of Portland warm-ups and wants everyone to know and subsidise him for the privilege.

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Dyfed72 on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

A van with a Beastmaker is the must have accessory these days. 

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louiswain - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Dyfed72:

That's well last year. The wads are all MoonBoard snowplough these days.

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Martin Hore - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to climbercool:

> I have never met a climber who regularly uses a fingerboard and cant climb 6b. 

Looks like we've never met then!

To be fair I use my fingerboard (a Beastmaker 1000 rigged above a door lintel at home) exclusively for pull-up sessions on the middle rail, combined with a rather greater amount of time spent at the wall and outdoors, but I'm not regularly climbing 6b - in fact hardly at all these days.  Perhaps being 68 has something to do with it.  At least one climber has declared a target of "7a at 70" - I'm sure there are others in that league, but I don't think I'll be joining them, with or without my Beastmaker.

Martin

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Tobes on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Split board is the way to go Joe! (and that rhymes innit)

apparently they are all the rage this winter-gets you (and proudly sponsored by opps) to the top of that mountain, once there you can mount it, do some reps then strap it on and ‘ride’ back to #lookatmedontlookatme gram land 

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ALF_BELF on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Holy hell. You should be extremely embarrassed about that blog.  Hang your head in shame, terminate the website and start on pastures new without the need for validation as a rad outdoors bloke. 

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climbercool - on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to Martin Hore:

Good luck getting to 7a martin!  No doubt being 68 makes it so much harder to improve.

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PaulJepson - on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

Bit harsh of people to be ragging on the OP for his blog. It may not be hard or adventurous or difficult to you but if my mam saw that she'd be well impressed. One man's adventure may seem tedious to another; what one person considers difficult will be pedestrian to someone else. 

Joe, given that you seem quite new to climbing (apologies if that's not the case - you haven't logged much on UKC but it could be that you've been climbing for years), I'd recommend you read up a bit on climbing development before you start doing one-armers off your little pinkie. It takes a good while for your ligaments/tendons/connective-tissues to catch up with your muscles, so you're very susceptible to injury in the first 18 months of climbing. General recommendation is not to campus or fingerboard until you've been climbing solidly (purposeful, multiple-weekly sessions) for about a year. 

And always make sure you warm up thoroughly before!

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slab_happy on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to louiswain:

> That's well last year. The wads are all MoonBoard snowplough these days.

"Moonboard Snowplough" needs to be a route name, y/y?

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MischaHY - on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to PaulJepson:

To be fair it's nothing to do with the difficulty level and everything to do with the fact that every post is full of affiliate links to amazon and desperate attempts to convince people to click through and buy gear that he's endorsing as an 'expert' which he clearly isn't. The whole site is geared towards monetising the content whilst ignoring the fact that the content itself is sorely lacking in quality. He posted an easily answered question on the highest frequented online climbing forum and linked to his website in the OP in a poorly disguised attempt to get traffic and thereby make money through said affiliate links, alongside improving SEO which is why the admins have removed the hyperlink but left the text in. It's frankly embarrassing. 

I like a good grassroots blog as much as the next guy and love the psyche that people new to climbing can bring, alongside fresh perspectives - but this ain't that. If he binned the affiliate rubbish and made an effort to improve narrative/writing complexity (something that is understandably challenging at first) on future blog posts I'd happily read again but right now it looks like a money grab and just makes me feel a bit pissed off. 

Oh, and that sandstone looks wet in his video. Just saying... 

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badmarmot - on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to Joe Wenman:

He does seam very keen to make a living doing this online thing, he posted on rock climbing uk's Facebook page that he is starting a new group, looking for adventure writers and photographers, as he is looking to launching a free e-magazine in July, even saying that they could be payment for this content, maybe if he gets some help with the content he can make it work?

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Jon Stewart - on 10 Mar 2019
George_Surf - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Dyfed72:

The good thing is if you’ve got a beastmaker in your van, you don’t actually need to go climbing 👍

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rachelpearce01 - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to ianstevens:

I agree! The world has gone crazy about training it seems. People need the get out on rock more, it teaches you so much more than hanging off a 20mm edge! Like reading routes, trying different moves etc etc... 

i can do maybe 3 pull ups but climb to an ok standard!

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ianstevens - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to rachelpearce01:

Agreed. I used to be in the three pull-up camp, and I could still get up E5/7a under certain (slatey) circumstances. Now I can do more pull ups, with more weight and can still only get up E5 (but also 7b+ and am far more rounded...)

Point is, learn to climb first then get strong always seemed the way. Now, like you say, people seem to want to skip the first bit.

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jezb1 - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to ianstevens:

> Point is, learn to climb first then get strong always seemed the way. Now, like you say, people seem to want to skip the first bit.

That's the key isn't it. I see people max hanging mad weights, on edges much smaller than 20mm, but their grades don't even come close to matching.

Over the course of my recent 2 month sport trip I've lost strength and probably power, but climbed harder than I ever have done. I will be using my fingerboard a little on next winters trip to try and keep the training topped up, but not at the expense of actual climbing.

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