Loading Notifications...

Home wall without the space.

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
 mutt 18 Nov 2020

How many people aspire to have a home wall but don't have the space inside their house? Would you buy into a entirely self supporting and weatherproof wall in the garden? How much would you pay for say 25msqu of climbing surface?

Report
 mark s 18 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

It's going to cost a lot, I personally wouldn't bother. I've got awesome walls in Stoke 10 miles away and the roaches 3 miles away. 

I don't know how far from a wall you are but they have everything and don't cost a lot. 

I just have a few strips of wood to hang off for the days I can't be bothered climbing or it's raining 

Report
 nikoid 18 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

I've got a horrible feeling I would find the construction project side of things more interesting than actually using it. 

Report
 Sean_J 18 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

I would suggest that a lot of people lacking indoor space for a wall might be similarly lacking a suitable outdoor space - 25sq.m sounds like a nice big wall to train on but the footprint must be considerable? Personally I wouldn't bother with an outdoor wall even if I had no space indoors for one, I can't be arsed going out in the cold/wet/wind/dark

Report
 Andy Gamisou 19 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

I have a space of around 12sqm on which I built a wall.  Materials and holds cost me around £500 15 years ago.  I do use it, but no where near as much as I thought I would.  I use the beastmaker I bought about 10 years ago much more tbh.

Report
 ianstevens 19 Nov 2020
In reply to Sean_J:

And equally wouldn't be in the bracket looking to drop a few grand on a wall. There's quite a few "solutions" to this problem, all of which are incredibly expensive for what they are.

Report
 Dog Dave 19 Nov 2020

In theory I would be one of the ones that should be interested - my house has very low ceilings which make indoor walls or even finding somewhere to hang a pull up bar difficult- but then for me climbing walls are only of interest when it’s raining or dark, otherwise I would rather be on rocks. So unless it was covered and / or lit not sure I could see it paying off for me.

now an affordable version of a treadwall type device I could be tempted by........

Report
 mutt 19 Nov 2020
In reply to Dog Da

> So unless it was covered and / or lit not sure I could see it paying off for me.

yes I agree, I was thinking about a cave type wall so it stays dry inside and lit with weatherproof leds. Would that work for you?

Not sure there is much to be done about winter cold but I had quite a lot of use out of my 8m high drytooling wall over the last few winters, the effort is rewarded with warmth.

Report
 Dog Dave 19 Nov 2020

That sounds like has some potential in that case, are you thinking a wall in a shed or something more elaborate?

Report
 mutt 19 Nov 2020
In reply to Dog Dave:

> That sounds like has some potential in that case, are you thinking a wall in a shed or something more elaborate?


based on boat building skills it would be a kind of a up-ended hull wrapping around by about 270 degrees intrinsically self supporting and if I have done my calculations correctly also intrinsically stable. its not cheap to make but per sqm comparable in weight and price to a moon board or other boards available on google shopping. I guess the questio really is it worth investing in the tooling. I'd quite like one myself, and as  nikoid pointed out I'd enjoy the process, but it would be much more financially viable for me to build a few for sale. 

Report
 Dog Dave 19 Nov 2020

Certainly sounds interesting but I suspect would end up more expensive than I could justify, although I guess the more you would make the better that would get.

Personally if it was in the hundereds I might go for it once seen more details etc and if above a grand I wouldn’t be able to justify it. Not really based on any hard science but that’s just my personal situation. Not sure if that helps or hinders.

Report
 Sean_J 19 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

Does sound like a good plan. Minimises the area of pads needed too, i'm doing a similar wrap-around wall in my garage right now. What kind of tooling do you need though? A good design would be pretty simple to build (think of something like four moonboards angled in toward each other, with 3 of the 4 corners filled out by 45 degree boards) and wouldn't need to be CNC'ed or anything like that, you could even use off-the-shelf brackets to make most of the joins and it would probably be more cost-effective unless you're churning out hundreds of walls...

Report
 mutt 20 Nov 2020
In reply to Sean_J:

> Does sound like a good plan. Minimises the area of pads needed too, i'm doing a similar wrap-around wall in my garage right now. What kind of tooling do you need though? A good design would be pretty simple to build (think of something like four moonboards angled in toward each other, with 3 of the 4 corners filled out by 45 degree boards) and wouldn't need to be CNC'ed or anything like that, you could even use off-the-shelf brackets to make most of the joins and it would probably be more cost-effective unless you're churning out hundreds of walls...

This https://1drv.ms/u/s!AmxQ7aACzwQ6lRF5TPd9CrhTKUEH

Is what happens to plywood painted with three coast of polyester paint. So if the wall doesn't fit inside then some other materials are needed. 

Report
 Sean_J 20 Nov 2020
In reply to mutt:

Well, yeah, plywood does do that when exposed to rain, painting it just slows down the process a bit if you're lucky. If you're putting it outdoors then i'd imagine the best plan is to put a proper roof on it - like a massive shed roof made with something decent, not that bitumen roll stuff that disintegrates after a few years. Would be relatively easy to put over a beehive-kind of wall and not take up any extra space (as opposed to a big open canopy over the traditional one-big-flat-panel design)

What material will stand up to the long-term ravages of UK weather though? And is it cheaper than decent ply with a roof over it? Bearing in mind that you wouldn't want to use a wall that doesn't have a roof anyway if it happens to be raining, or it has rained and the holds got wet due to lack of roof...

Report
 mutt 21 Nov 2020
In reply to Sean_J:

I have seen one buit to resemble a shed with opposing walls making the roof, the sides shiplapped and the 'roof' felted with overhangs and gutters. its a bit of an undertaking to build and probably needs a concrete raft. It is certainly weatherproof and probably even heatable!

Report

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.