/ Recommended Weight Loss Podcasts?

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afx22 - on 11 Feb 2019

Can anyone recommend a good podcast episode or series that discusses weight loss for active people?

I’ve been searching the web and almost all of the podcasts seem to be aimed Keto diets or simple carb cutting.

I’m looking to lose maybe 5lb or so.  Sounds easy but I’ve been plataued for around 8 months now.

I climb, run, bike etc six times a week, so I’m trying to find something that will fit that lifestyle.

Thanks in advance.

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Phil Scott - on 11 Feb 2019
In reply to afx22:

It's not a podcast recommendation, but have you tried using the app MyFitnessPal?

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girlymonkey - on 11 Feb 2019
In reply to afx22:

Again, not a podcast (we are all good at following instructions here!) but I heard an interesting theory recently that you should focus on increasing you dietary fibre. Veg and wholegrains. Easier to up something than reduce something, and if you have filled up on veg and whole grains then you won't feel hungry for much else! 

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kevin stephens - on 11 Feb 2019
afx22 - on 19:35 Mon
In reply to Phil Scott:

Hi Phil, I have used it in the past and found it to be really good.  I only have a Garmin Forerunner watch, rather than a multi sport device, so unfortunately I can’t measure my calories burned while doing other sports.  A Fenix 5 Plus is on the shopping list

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afx22 - on 19:36 Mon
In reply to girlymonkey:

That sounds interesting.  I’ll look more into that.  I could live on bran flakes

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afx22 - on 19:37 Mon
In reply to kevin stephens:

I already have this on my Amazon wish list.  Is it any good?

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kevin stephens - on 19:52 Mon
In reply to afx22:

yes I thought so

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afx22 - on 20:35 Mon
In reply to kevin stephens:

Ordered.  Thanks!

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Shani - on 21:42 Mon
In reply to afx22:

The most important question you need to answer is what are your current body fat levels?

Losing weight at 7% BF will require calorie manipulation and is rarely sustainable - certainly not if you train hard.

Around 10-12% BF is easily accomplishable for men with higher protein and intermittent fasting.

Anything in between will require a rough management of calories (nothing too precise).

Post edited at 21:43
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ChrisBrooke - on 21:45 Mon
In reply to afx22:

Dr Rhonda Patrick Found My Fitness podcast has a lot of science-based health/diet/lifestyle advice/info. Worth checking out. 

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The New NickB - on 21:49 Mon
In reply to afx22:

A forerunner will give you calorie data in the Garmin connect app. It would be prefect, but as accurate as a fitbit or similar.

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girlymonkey - on 22:00 Mon
In reply to afx22:

The thing I read reckoned you need 30g a day of fibre (which is a lot!)

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/making-one-change-getting-fiber-can-help-weight-loss-201502177721

Post edited at 22:19
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afx22 - on 13:01 Tue
In reply to Shani:

I agree about the importance of body fat levels.  I have no way of easily measuring it but I suspect I'm 20-22% (based on measurements from years ago).  When I was at my fittest, in my mid 20's, the lowest I used to hit was around 15% or more.  I used to do around 250-300 miles a week on the bike back then.  I'd love to get down to 12% or so!

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afx22 - on 13:02 Tue
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

Fond and subscribed.  Thanks.

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afx22 - on 13:06 Tue
In reply to The New NickB:

My Forerunner (FR620) is great for running but fairly useless for other sports.  I can't really track a hike or a climbing session.  It'll track biking on a very basic level.  Even a trail run tends to mess up the recovery and VO2 Max metrics.  It's also missing battery duration to measure all day, so miles behind whata  Fenix can do.

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Shani - on 13:06 Tue
In reply to afx22:

> I agree about the importance of body fat levels.  I have no way of easily measuring it but I suspect I'm 20-22% (based on measurements from years ago).  When I was at my fittest, in my mid 20's, the lowest I used to hit was around 15% or more.  I used to do around 250-300 miles a week on the bike back then.  I'd love to get down to 12% or so!

Sub 15% is easily achievable for a healthy male under 55.

Search some of my previous history for macro recommendations and fasting windows..

Post edited at 13:06
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afx22 - on 13:12 Tue
In reply to Shani:

Sub 15% fat has not been 'easy' for me, so far in my lifetime!

I'll have a dig and see what I can find.

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Shani - on 13:59 Tue
In reply to afx22:

> Sub 15% fat has not been 'easy' for me, so far in my lifetime!

> I'll have a dig and see what I can find.

Assuming you have never been morbidly obese, food quality, macros and fasting will get you down to where you to 12%. You've got to go through your metabolic gears (metflex).

Will try to dig out a link, later. Busy atm!

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annak on 16:03 Tue
In reply to afx22:

TrainingBeta podcast has a fair amount about nutrition and weight loss.

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Bezz - on 17:36 Tue
In reply to afx22:

If you are around 20% BF and exercising a lot, but not loosing weight then it's likely that you are simply consuming too many calories. The answer may be simpler than you think (but not necessarily easy) and you don't necessarily need to adopt a specific diet plan (i.e. keto / low or no carb / fasting etc) although there are tactics from some eating plans that can be helpful in preventing hunger. 

I've been on a similar journey to what you described (heavier than I want to be despite exercise), what changed for me was simply being made aware of my calorie intake through measuring on My Fitness Pal. It really highlighted where I was over consuming, which was mostly at weekends with very rich (and very nice meals) paired with alcohol which also contains loads of calories. For me alcohol always leads to over indulgence with food (snacks, nice deserts etc) - this was an important insight I hadn't really noticed before I started measuring my intake, so I changed some habits and weight dropped off quite quickly. I have also read up /listened to a lot of theory and "bro science" as there is so much around. 

I'd really recommend starting to log all your calorie intake with My Fitness Pal - I was surprised by my consumption as my 4 beers on a Friday night is 800-900 cals, but I only need c. 2000 in total everyday! Log everything, meals, snacks, drinks, don't leave anything out. There is a bar code scanner so it's easy to do. Also make a note of your weight each week (you can do this in MFP too). If you want to loose weight you need to consume slightly fewer calories than your body needs. So, if you are logging everything but your weight remains stable try cutting your calories by 10%. Continue to measure intake and weight and adjust as needed. 

Hope this doesn't sound patronising, there is so much info out there due to the diet "industry" that this simple theory is often overlooked these days. 

Things that helped me to reduce calorie intake : 

- a good breakfast with lots of protein (usually eggs)

- a meal plan for the week (mostly pre prepped) 

- increased protein intake to help with a feeling of fullness for longer

- be careful with carbs, they are not the enemy but they are very easy to eat so be careful you aren't overeating them (this is my weakness, I love pasta / bagels / rice and can eat loads without feeling full)

- watch the alcohol intake and associate "treats" 

- increase fibre intake through bulky veg, helps me feel more full and veg are not very high in calories

Hope this is in someway helpful, 5lbs isn't much, with the right intake that should drop off in 2 to 4 weeks. 

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Shani - on 18:20 Tue
In reply to Shani:

> Assuming you have never been morbidly obese, food quality, macros and fasting will get you down to where you to 12%. You've got to go through your metabolic gears (metflex).

> Will try to dig out a link, later. Busy atm!

I can't use the search function to search older posts. I think there is a problemo technicalos at UKC.

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afx22 - on 21:39 Tue
In reply to Bezz:

That’s a brilliant reply.  Thanks for taking the time to post it.

I think you’re spot on about calorie intake.  The crux is finding a way of cutting down without the rumbling belly.

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Bezz - on 21:59 Tue
In reply to afx22:

No worries, good luck with it. 

Once you start measuring your intake you might find some high calorie foods you won't miss.

Try upping the protein and / or eat lots of vegetables to keep hunger under control - it's really hard to over eat on veg! 

Another consideration, be careful with the calorie measurement from a fitness device - I use a Garmin Fenix 3 HR which is great but the calorie measurement is only an estimate. In the same way everyone has a different basal metabolic rate (the amount of calories you need without any physical activity), we all burn calories at different rates. This is why you need to measure your intake and see what influence it has on your weight. Even if you are exercising, be careful you don't overeat - fundamentally, if you aren't getting lighter then you aren't in calorie deficit 

Post edited at 22:06
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bouldery bits - on 22:05 Tue
In reply to afx22:

Lots of fibre works for me.

I'm convinced different people's bodies respond to different dietary in different ways and require different stimulus to get certain results. 

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Yanis Nayu - on 07:56 Wed
In reply to afx22:

Just use MyFitnessPal- I’ve lost 4 pound in about 10 days with it and I’m already skinny. 

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UKB Shark - on 08:31 Wed
In reply to Shani:

> Sub 15% is easily achievable for a healthy male under 55.

55 soon. Should I be worried?

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MischaHY - on 14:01 Wed
In reply to afx22:

Here's the hard reality: Losing weight means feeling uncomfortable for a period of time. 

You can try and dodge around, mess with macro balance etc etc but the reality is that at times you will feel hungry because you are in a calorie deficit and your body (quite naturally) isn't keen on the idea. 

However:

A simple method of cutting down whilst maintaining good energy levels in exercise is to focus on protein and fats outside of active periods e.g. breakfast (Think 250g Quark, 15-20g nuts and a handful of berries, or three scrambled eggs and an avocado), do similar at lunch and then consume some starchy carbs in the hour before exercise and also during (100g white Rice with 30g raisins and then a cereal bar or two during training). Then afterwards protein, fats and non-starchy colourful veg e.g. 150-200g baked chicken breast, a handful of cherry tomatoes, sliced red/yellow/green pepper on a bed of rocket (drizzle with 1-2 tsp olive oil and a pinch of salt for dressing).

Generally choosing a lean protein portion and then filling your plate with non-starchy vegetables will sort you out and also nail the micronutrient side of things. 

I recommend using Cronometer to log calories (it can also set daily targets etc for free), and not being afraid to consume a reasonable amount (c.a. 40-60g) sugary carbs during exercise as these will be used to fuel a higher performance and in turn lead to better fitness and more effective fat loss during recovery. 

Consider doing a 4-6 week period of breakfast fasting to up-regulate your fat metabolism and improve metabolic flexibility (the ability to switch quickly between fat or carbs as fuel). This worked extremely well for me having previously had really poor metabolic flexibility and struggled with not having a consistent 'drip-feed' of carbs throughout the day. 

Hope this helps and best of luck. Consistency is everything! 

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afx22 - on 22:31 Wed
In reply to MischaHY:

Thanks for the reply.  That feels like the way I need to go - planning meals around more structure.  Cheers.

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Kemics - on 06:38 Thu
In reply to afx22:

Absolutely nothing to do with weight loss specifically. However, the Jocko Willink podcast gets me fired up. Excellent motivation for training. His whole schtick is that there are no hacks or easy fixes, only the unrelenting grind of daily discipline which gives results. 

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MischaHY - on 09:45 Thu
In reply to Kemics:

> His whole schtick is that there are no hacks or easy fixes, only the unrelenting grind of daily discipline which gives results. 

This is a serious truth bomb though. Consistency combined with the correct application of training effort over time. No magic wands and no shortcuts! 

It's encouraging though really because it crushes the idea that anybody is 'special'. Sure, some people have more opportunities or a more naturally advantageous body composition, but the main factor is hard work. 

Post edited at 09:46
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afx22 - on 10:33 Thu
In reply to MischaHY:

The dilemma I have always struggled with is that I can train and practice at whatever sport and I get better, stronger and fitter.  But when it comes to weight loss, I can eat salads, protein, fruit, leave out alcohol and so on for very little impact.  

Both are getting more difficult as I age.

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Bezz - on 12:55 Thu
In reply to afx22:

Age doesn't help, but don't be seduced by the idea that just eating salads and fruit leads to weight loss and it's entirely possible to loose weight without doing any exercise (but it is harder). 

I've copied this from a Facebook group I'm a member of and applied my stats to it (male,early 40's, moderately active) but I'm sure they wouldn't mind me reproducing it here: 

My basal metabolic rate (BMR) is estimated at 2,000 calories meaning I need about 2,000 calories to maintain my body weight assuming little or no activity. 

All activity I do beyond getting out of bed adds to this, a relaxed day for me burns probably 200 calories additional to BMR but a more active day will be higher than this. 

Add together BMR and calories burned through activity = Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE). If you consume calories equivalent to your TDEE you will maintain body weight. If you consume fewer calories than your TDEE, you will loose weight and if you exceed your TDEE in consumed calories you will get heavier. 

I believe my TDEE for an average day to be around 2,200 - 2,500. Much more for a really active day. 

1kg of fat is equivalent to about 7,000 calories. 

To loose 1kg of fat in 30 days, I need to be in calorie deficit of about 233 calories per day or 1,633 calories per week (7,000 calories  / 30 days = 233 calories per day). Assuming my TDEE is 2,500 and I consume 2,267 then in about a month I should loose about 1kg in weight (which will probably be mostly, but not entirely fat). 

I guess my point here is that calorie deficit is king if you want to loose weight. Depending on a persons intake, small changes ( a small calorie deficit - 10% to begin with) , applied consistently over time will lead to results. I've probably laboured this point but if you aren't measuring your intake then to an extent you will be working blind. 

Post edited at 12:58
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MischaHY - on 08:48 Fri
In reply to afx22:

The thing is mate you could just as 'easily' lose weight eating only pizza and chocolate as long as you got the numbers right. If you're not in deficit then you won't lose weight even with the healthiest diet going. 

This is why tracking intake/weight is important because it gives you accountability and let's you see exactly how the numbers are progressing. 

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afx22 - on 12:38 Fri
In reply to MischaHY:

Digesting all of the responses here, it's fired me up more and more than I need to be able to track what I'm consuming AND what I'm burning, so that I can manage my calorie balance.  That's the Fenix 5 Plus to the top of my shopping list!

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afx22 - on 12:45 Fri
In reply to Bezz:

That's a great reply that I'm very grateful for.  Thanks.

I think you've hit the nail on the head and I like the structure.  Measuring calorie intake should be easy enough.

It's calories burned that's my challenge.  For instance, in the last 6 days I've done two runs (10 miles+ and 4 miles+), bouldered indoors three times (3 + 3 + 3.5 hours = 9.5 hours), 1 walk (3 miles) plus a bit of fingerboarding and easy yoga (and planty of monging about on the couch).  I can only track the calories burnt for the running (because that's the limit of my watch).

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MischaHY - on 13:14 Fri
In reply to afx22:

>  That's the Fenix 5 Plus to the top of my shopping list!

I love a good toy but do be sure to make the distance between things that will 'help' and what is actually necessary. I've personally never done any accurate tracking of calorie output because relatively vague estimates tend to suffice. 

If you're keen and able to invest money in the situation then enlisting the help of a good nutritionist will be far, far, more effective than buying a watch and will help foster an altered diet that allows you not just lose weight but also maintain that leaner figure and adapt your lifestyle so that 'healthy eating' becomes 'normal eating'. 

Personally I can recommend Tom Herbert (@usefulcoach on Instagram and Facebook) who has helped me make a huge change in lifestyle and body composition over the last 8 months or so - however, I'm sure there's plenty of other qualified, experienced people who would be happy to help.

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Bezz - on 16:51 Sat
In reply to afx22:

Totally agree with MischaHY, I love new kit to play with but good advice and coaching will likely have a greater (and longer term) impact 

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kevin stephens - on 17:25 Sat
In reply to afx22:

This has been in the news recently 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-47242940

I think there’s definitely something in this, once the summer evenings come and I regularly get out on my road bike for a couple of hours cycling a number of steep hills the weight falls off dramatically. Unfortunately it comes back every winter 

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