/ Trail/ Fell running and its impact on climbing.

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jackob - on 09 Apr 2019

Hi,

At the moment I am very serious/committed about my training for climbing and improving as much as possible. However, I am starting to enjoy running on my rest days. I'm not aspiring to be an elite runner however I am aspiring to complete things like the patterdale/Fairfield horseshoes e.c.t just for my own enjoyement. I was wondering how much I can/should train for running without it having a negative effect on my rock climbing.

Thanks

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Neil Williams - on 09 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

Assuming it's not about spare time, and you don't do so much running you get injured, I can't see how it would have any adverse effect on your climbing at all.  Indeed, if you climb at a relatively local wall, why not get a decent warm-up by running to the wall?  Certainly I find cycling to the wall always makes me climb better than driving there.

Post edited at 23:57
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Marek - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

The most likely negative impact is that the running will reduce your hip/back flexibility, so make sure you also do something about that. An extra proper* stretching session per run should do.

* About 20mins of long warmed-up stretches, not just some pre/post-run bouncing around.

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AJM - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

Depends how hard you're trying, in both. There's a limited amount that your body can recover from in any given week, so if you're using some of that budget to recover from running you'll be able to recover less effectively from climbing. But whether that's your limiting factor or not rather depends on how much you're doing and how hard you're trying.

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TMM on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to Marek:

> The most likely negative impact is that the running will reduce your hip/back flexibility, so make sure you also do something about that. An extra proper* stretching session per run should do.

> * About 20mins of long warmed-up stretches, not just some pre/post-run bouncing around.

I agree with this. As my running has increased (I run about 45k a week mainly off road) my hip flexors have tightened and my lower back has caused me some real problems. Preventative stretching helps but it has caused me down time as back and upper legs recover. More time, better planning and clearer priorities would all probably help.

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Tom Last - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

As other have said, it depends or much you run, rest and climb and to an extent how fit you already are.

A couple of years ago I went in six months from not really running to running about 40-50 miles off road a week. To start with I was pretty unfit and as I approached the point of intersection of how much I ran/climbed, my climbing improved markedly as my resting heart rate dropped and I found that I was calmer and more in control on cruxes and with climbing generally; or at least that’s what I attributed it to, but I guess it could have been any number of factors. 

Then as my mileage grew beyond a certain point, I wasn’t recovering well enough, nor did I have the free days to actually fit climbing into my free time, so naturally my climbing performance bombed.

Tbf, I’d think that with the examples you give, you should be able to spend little enough time training to run those that you can still fit a decent enough amount of climbing into your week. Then again, I have no idea from what point you’re starting with running, nor how fast you’re hoping to do such runs, both of which factors will, amongst others, make a big difference. 

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MischaHY - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

Once or twice a week for 5-10km at a slow, steady pace? Fine. More than that will impact on strength gains. 

I had a great period of running 4x per week when rehabbing an injury in December/January because the only climbing training I could do was some max hangs and long circuits (8 minutes on the wall at a time). 

As soon as I started working harder on the wall/rock again I had to cut it out because it was too much and I got knackered. 

I was a bit gutted as it was the first time I'd ever got into running and enjoyed it thoroughly but I can still get out for the occasional run and climbing is more important. 

Post edited at 10:38
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bouldery bits - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to jackob:

Different people's bodies are different. They react differently to stress and stimuli. 

I would say, from my own experience, give it a go but watch the flexibility (not that I was ever that flexible anyway!)

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Eric9Points - on 10 Apr 2019
In reply to bouldery bits:

Yes, I'd have thought the best thing is to start running and if the OP gets to a stage where they find that running is starting to interfere with their climbing then dial back a bit.

I'd have thought that a certain amount of aerobic excercise can only improve fitness for climbing.

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