/ Types of fingerboard mounts

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UrbanClimber 26 Nov 2019

Hi all,

I'm trying to figure out how to hang a fingerboard with the minimum impact, that is, no holes, no nothing, completely removable (missus' constraints ;)

Anyone can give me any pointers, please?

Thanks!

Post edited at 11:46
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druss 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

Recommend this if you have wide enough doorway.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Powerbar-assembly-Folds-Design-protectors/dp/B00376I6G4

Then make backboard to hook over the top of the pullup bar.  Mount hangboard to that.  You can also adjust the backboard to a convenient height.  Some can end up quite low to the ground at full hang.

https://www.ukclimbing.com/photos/dbpage.php?id=337026

The bolt is used as stopper to keep the board vertical.

Post edited at 12:29
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UrbanClimber 26 Nov 2019
In reply to druss:

That's pretty neat indeed! Thanks for the input!

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Niek 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

I used to use the above solution, I now have http://crusherholds.co.uk/fingerboard-hangboard-mounting-device-2 which feels more solid and tends to dent the door frame less. 

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Lemony 26 Nov 2019
In reply to Niek:

Same as Niek for me. Works really well. You can invisibly make it feel even more solid by knocking in a couple of nails vertically down the outside corners of the doorframe into the side trim.

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stevevans5 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

Similar to the above, I use the iron gym style doorframe pull-up bar and a homemade hangboard which hooks on. Then have some 3mm ply with foam on the back to protect the doorframe

https://photos.app.goo.gl/sUqRRkmAct9kFvELA

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Angrypenguin 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

I built my own crusher style mount as I wasn't sure the crusher one would set it high enough as I am quite tall.

The ply is 18 mm thick, the Beastmaker screws into this and then a small rail screws onto the back of the ply and goes over the top of the door frame. The back board then fits into the frame where the door would be and is secured to the ply with 20 cm coach bolts (length dependent on door depth). All this from b&q and screwfix for about £25.

The key with the back board was to set it as high in the frame as possible, you can see the holes from my first attempt. If it is too low the whole thing tends to roll forwards off the frame. When the board is secured towards the middle of the ply it pulls the top and the bottom of the ply in, securing it better.

The thing I like about this setup is that you can clip krabs on the coach bolts and then set up a pulley (not shown) easily. It has a tiny creak to it when weighted but doesn't noticeably move, even with pull ups off the jugs.

Worth noting that this is semi permanent - it takes ~ 3 mins to go up and down with unscrewing the bolts so I can take it down with visitors round for Christmas etc. but otherwise it stays up.

My 3D design model here is sized for my door and a beastmaker 1000 but gives you the idea: https://www.tinkercad.com/things/cmmnjkEM45B-fingerboard-mount

Pics: https://imgur.com/a/9SGx1Bj

Post edited at 16:15
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jkarran 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

I hung mine from an attic hatch then still never used it

Not all door frames will stand pull-up bars. Often a couple of screws making a discrete fixing and leaving a tiny repair when you move on is a better bet than the dents, gouges and cracks the various bars can leave.

jk

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druss 26 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

No problem.  Didn't take long to build either but car needed in the measurements.  For what its worth, I've got no damage on the door frame after 3 years of use.  When I looked at other solutions they seemed to hang very low, but that's just judging from photos.

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Mr Trebus 26 Nov 2019
In reply to jkarran:

Totally agree. Tried the Powerbar method in a couple of new builds I have lived in and the frames weren't up to it. One caused the tape joints on the plasterboard to crack. 

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UrbanClimber 27 Nov 2019
In reply to jkarran:

Good point. I'd assume all door frames would sustain a load of ~100 kg (given the top piece rests on the sides), but I guess I don't want to find out the hard way.

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stevevans5 27 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

It's more the fact that the powerbar puts a lot of force inwards into the wall above the doorframe. Fine if it is a fairly solid wall but not great for plasterboard or other lightweight constructions. 

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Big Lee 27 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

I used the crusher holds type as well in my old rented house. Easy to make your own if you've some carpentry skills as it's essentially two planks of wood clamped together either side of the door frame. 

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In reply to druss:

I have something very similar to druss. Easy to put up and take down. Causes no marks on the wall.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Pykn2Q7nSnP9G83u8

https://photos.app.goo.gl/t3LYMQJFeZus8Kt29

I left some room at the bottom where I was actually going to mount a rung of uniform depth. Still to make that though.

Post edited at 10:57
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jkarran 27 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

> Good point. I'd assume all door frames would sustain a load of ~100 kg (given the top piece rests on the sides), but I guess I don't want to find out the hard way.

You load the decorative trim, they're usually mitred so a down load on the top piece acts to push the verticals aside. In older builds they're generally sparingly nailed softwood, generally strong enough of loaded sensibly. In more modern builds they're often glued MDF which is not up to much beyond looking passable.

The designs that clamp onto the actual door frame should be solid but a bit of a pain to put up and take down.

jk

Post edited at 11:58
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Munch 27 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

I bought a pull up frame like this: https://www.bodyandfit.com/en-gb/Products/Clothing-%26-accessories/Sport-accessories/Fitness-accessories/Luxury-Pull-Up-Bar/p/11147?gclid=Cj0KCQiA2vjuBRCqARIsAJL5a-JxNK4Z-1aMFAvTyex8DCqqSx6RkZp1uBtUsqynKDiVc1uGX8yj8zsaApOAEALw_wcB

Then removed the front facing bits of foam, drilled 2 snug holes the diameter of the metal tube in the back of the finger boards and hammered it on. 

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D.Russell 27 Nov 2019
In reply to Martin McKenna - UKC:

well, its not going to leave a mark if you dont use it. 

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druss 27 Nov 2019
In reply to Martin McKenna - UKC:

Very nice.  :D

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druss 27 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

> Good point. I'd assume all door frames would sustain a load of ~100 kg (given the top piece rests on the sides), but I guess I don't want to find out the hard way.

The powerbar uses leverage to spread the load horizontal creating a high torque - if that's the correct term.  Whilst I've had no issue with damage I think you could do something to protect it.  From what I could tell during my research into attachments options they all had potential for damage, but this way looked the least risk for me.

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andyman666999 28 Nov 2019
In reply to UrbanClimber:

New missus - problem solved ;-)

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