/ NEW REVIEW: Grivel Trail Pole

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Grivel Trail Poles collapsed, 3 kbThe Grivel Trail Pole is a compact, lightweight trekking pole, revolutionary in its design and execution, says Mike Kann.

"A pole's a pole right? That's what I thought until I saw the Grivel Trail pole on a stand in Snellsport in Chamonix. It looked different to the other poles on the stand lighter and sleeker with no lumpy plastic joints. On closer inspection I realised that the pole folds up a bit like an avalanche probe this I immediately realised was a revolution in poles! That's a dramatic statement, but here's why it's true..."

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=3291

Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Gear:

I don't like using poles due to RSI wrist and shoulder problems but have been using the trail poles for over a year now after a knee injury...
They are ideal for climbers due to their very lightweight and small packed size which fits neatly inside a rucksack.
I was a bit worried about them freezing up and not being able to collapse them using the small push button. It wasn't as big an issue as I thought though as the ice axe pick works really well on the small button!!!


Cheers Ron
In reply to Ron Walker:
> but have been using the trail poles for over a year now after a knee injury...

So they sound pretty tough then Ron? They kind of look a bit delicate having got use to 'normal' style pole but it sounds like yours are lasting well.
ChrisHolloway1 - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Gear: These look awesome bud, any idea of a good place to get them?
In reply to Ron Walker: Ron, have you looked at Pacerpoles? Might be good for dodgy wrist issues. Not to denigrate the Grivel poles of course...
interdit - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Gear:
> On closer inspection I realised that the pole folds up a bit like an avalanche probe this I immediately realised was a revolution in poles!


Sounds similar to the way Raidlight poles work.

A comparison article would be useful.*

The Raidlight sound lighter too, but I've no idea of how strong they are in comparison or how well they work in the field.




* for me at least - I've been considering the benefits of spending money on something like this for running in snowy mountains. Poles help big style on the way up, but are a pain to stow when running the rest of the route.
Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to interdit:

I first saw them with the Raidlight poles during the TMB two summers ago and they are pretty similar.
Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to TobyA:

I try and avoid using poles apart from in deep snow or if I have a heavy pack so my idea of using them is that they sit inside my pack until I actually need them or my knee locks!
Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to ChrisHolloway1:

Cairngorm Mountain Sport in Aviemore has them...
Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to dan bailey:
> (In reply to Ron Walker) Ron, have you looked at Pacerpoles? Might be good for dodgy wrist issues. Not to denigrate the Grivel poles of course...

I doubt pacers would solve all the other issues? I try to avoid becoming dependant on them and all poles do seem to give me painfully cold hands, elbow, shoulder and wrist problems. Apart from the Grivel poles most poles are clumsy, heavy and a pain when rock or ice climbing. So the downsides far outweigh the good points apart from when wading through deep snow...!
beardy mike - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to TobyA: They're anything but. The other poles available in this style from Kerma and Campare effectively tent poles and they really do look frail. What attracted me to these in the first place was that they are normal pole diameter, i.e. ski pole diameter all the way down, not like extendible poles. These may even be more robust? Don't hold me to it though...
SWalls - on 12 Dec 2010
What kind of snow conditions do these cope with? Does the small basket limit them much? Would the Himalaya poles be better for winter use?

Cheers
Ron Walker - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to stevewalls:
> What kind of snow conditions do these cope with? Does the small basket limit them much? Would the Himalaya poles be better for winter use?
>
> Cheers

Not found it a problem myself for walking on packet snow or neve but possibly if snowshoeing in really deep snow.
I have the older Himalaya Trail model and my partner the Trail and the only difference is I can unscrew the small round basket whereas the Trail model's asymmetric tip is one piece to save a few grams weight!
The newer Grivel Himalaya poles have a bigger basket but I'm sure you could easily retro push fit another plastic powder basket.
Looking at the Grivel website I see they have updated the basket on the latest models and have improved the push-button lock with a plastic sleeve - though I can't see a separate Trail and Himalaya model now...
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beardy mike - on 12 Dec 2010
In reply to stevewalls: I thought the small basket on the trail was not great on soft snow. On packed snow it was more than enough. It was still managable though. Personally I'll be trying to fit larger baskets...

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