/ Crevasse Rescue: Micro Traxion v. Kong Duck v. Ropeman

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Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
I'm looking to buy a device to use as a clutch for crevasse rescue. So far my thoughts have gone like this...

Petzl Micro Traxion: Too expensive.

Petzl Mini Traxion: Too heavy.

Kong Duck: Maybe the best bet at the moment. Possibly too much friction? Also quite rare so difficult to have a look at one before buying.

WC Ropeman 2: Seems appealing, but I'm concerned about the 1.5 kn axle strength. Is this a real problem or a hypothetical one? I guess i could back it up with a quickdraw clipped around the live rope and attached to the anchor?

WC Ropeman 3: Might be the answer. Has anyone tried using one 'Kong Duck' style? i.e. with the dead rope running around the sheave which covers the karabiner, so that it passes through the attachment karabiner before running back towards the crevasse.
mattrm - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

I'm tempted by the Kong Duck as well, but also I'd like to have a look at one first.
The Ex-Engineer - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic: I don't bother with anything other than a prusik loop and do not believe anything else is needed. I always do at least some practice each year but most importantly I'm going to be doing everything possible to avoid falling in one in the first place.

That said when I was last out in the Alps with lots of other Brits around in 2010, I do remember a few of the Guides carrying Kong Ducks in preference to other devices. Equally, a couple of them weren't carrying any specific device for hauling.
Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

I've just noticed that the axle strength of the Micro Traxion is 15 Kn - the same as the axle strength of the Ropeman. Petzl sell the Micro Traxion as a crevasse rescue device, so I guess 15kn is strong enough.

(Also just noticed the typo in my original post, I should have said 15kN not 1.5 kN for the axle strength of the Ropeman)
Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to EZ:

Yes I did get it wrong- I was typing a correction as you posted.
Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

So it looks like the Micro Traxion, Ropeman 3 and Duck are all strong enough, and all weigh virtually the same.

The Kong Duck is the cheapest and the hardest to get hold of.
The Ropeman 3 is the most widely available.
The Micro Traxion is the most efficient and the most expensive.

Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to The Ex-Engineer:
> (In reply to Oceanic) I don't bother with anything other than a prusik loop and do not believe anything else is needed.

My partner is lighter than me, which is what got me thinking about gadgets.

> I'm going to be doing everything possible to avoid falling in one in the first place.
>
Yes, I agree that's the most important bit.

> I do remember a few of the Guides carrying Kong Ducks in preference to other devices. Equally, a couple of them weren't carrying any specific device for hauling.

I'd noticed that in the alps this winter. It does make me think that they offer a real advantage.



Landy_Dom on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

Climbing Technology (CT) in Italy are just bringing one out too - look it up?
birdman - on 11 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

Firstly you don't NEED a device specifically for crevasse rescue and it is always good to know how to do a crevasse rescue with the minimum amount of kit. However, mechanical devices can be useful and do improve the efficiency of a hauling system.

Having attended the same event that the Ex Engineer probably attended in switzerland for the last 3 years and i'm instructing on it again this year. There are many BMG's who assist and provide training and info on kit and systems. From this I chose to go with the Kong Duck, which at the time was better than the wild country rope man equivalent, which i now believe they have modified so that it is pretty much exactly the same as the Duck.

I don't always carry my kong duck, but i always carry a prussic.

It is important to note that whilst every effort is made to avoid dropping into a crevasse, it is inevitable that when something does happen, it will be in the worst possible situation and thus swift and effective rescue becomes more difficult. If a mechanical device helps alleviate some of the issues that can occur with the use of prussics etc then it is of obvious benefit.

Oceanic - on 11 Jun 2012
mattrm - on 12 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

I was reading through my copy of Alpine Mountaineering by Bruce Goodlad last night and he recommends either a Kong Duck or a Ropeman, but in his photos, he's using the Duck. I think I'm going to take a punt on it personally.
Landy_Dom on 12 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic:

That's the one!
ads.ukclimbing.com
JimboWizbo - on 12 Jun 2012
In reply to Oceanic: I learned the method using a french prusik. I also keep a ropeman just incase, maybe if it ever happened I'd be too nervous to rely on a prusik

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