/ Stove advice for Peru/Cordillera Huayhuash trek

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oren02 - on 27 Jun 2012
I will be backpacking the Cordillera Huayhuash circuit in September self-sufficiently as light as possible. Which stove would you recommend either an MSR whisperlite to use petrol or a screw-on gas canister stove? Does the petrol in Peru/Huaraz work well with multi-fuel stoves and are screw-on gas canisters readily available in Huaraz? The highest camps are 4500m so there will be a temperature problem with the gas canisters. How much petrol would you recommend for a 14 day trek? I currently only have 1.3Litre capacity so I might need to get some extra bottles. If anyone is going to be Huaraz at the beginning of September and wants to join me?
Fultonius - on 27 Jun 2012
In reply to oren02: I guess you already own a whisperlite?

If not, I'd recommend a Primus instead. Better simmering capability, stronger pumps, can use screw on gas.

14 days. Hmm. Depends on exactly what you're doing but 1.3 litre should do you I would have thought. I've done 7 days x 2 people on 750ml.
jonnie3430 - on 27 Jun 2012
In reply to oren02:

You can get gas in Huaraz, I suggest looking in your hostel first as lots of people leave it before taking flights. I'd recommend gas, because I've never had any problems with it (if I'm worried about my water bottle freezing, then it and a gas canister go in my sleeping bag.) Petrol stoves are a faff (I have one too, but it takes longer to set up and is messier. Good for melting snow for an extended stay on a glacier (you will be able to get water.)
oren02 - on 27 Jun 2012
In reply to oren02:

Yes I already have the whisperlite(around 400grams) which I use alot when camping in scotland mainly because petrol is much cheaper to cook with than expensive coleman canisters. But on a long distance trek weight is more of an issue than cost so I have the optimus crux stove(around 90grams) for long walks and the largest gas canister usually lasts me around 10days. I also prefer gas canisters as you dont get the soot all over your hands when setting up and dismantling unlike the whisperlite.

I take it an altiude of 4500m is not enough to cause any problems when using gas canisters?
Andes - on 27 Jun 2012
In reply to oren02:
Gas should work fine at those altitudes. Maybe not ideal for this trip but buying one of these gas cylinder converters is really worthwhile if you get through a bit of gas - by the time you have bought just four piercable cylinders you'll have got your money back, and it saves weight as well if carrying any more than three cylinders (e.g when you're with friends too. Great too if you don't know which kind of cylinder will be avaialble.

http://www.needlesports.com/Catalogue/Cooking-Equipment/Fuel-Fire/ADAPTER-PUNCTURE-EDE-ADP

I would take two litres of liquid fuel. Bencina Blanca is widely available in Huaraz - it's a petrol product similar to Coleman Fuel so burns really cleanly.

Have you backpacked at high altitude for this length of time before. It's certainly possible but it will be hard work! Don't underestimate it and leave loads of time to acclimatise.
Andes - on 27 Jun 2012
In reply to Andes:
Forgot to say that you'll get through up to 50% more fuel at altitude than you will at sea level due to cold conditions and poor combustion in low oxygen. That's why it is worth taking a bit more fuel than you would for sea level.

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