/ New tourer/cyclo-x bike ?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
sarahjk - on 17 Aug 2012
After my recent holiday in the Alps I am dreaming of [another] new bike; some sort of tourer for future trips out there.

I currently have an Airborne Ti road bike, nicely speced out with carbon forks, Ultegra triple and some sort of blingy wheels, about 6 years old and lightly used. However deeply unsuitable for touring [and UK as doesnt take mudguards] no pannier mounts, rim brakes etc.

So, probably sell the roadie [any ideas how much ?] to fund a new beast. Or would it be worth cannibalizing it ?

Any recommendations of a nicely speced, not too heavy bike that would be good for touring, the odd dirt road maybe, some epic adventures definitely !

Thanks

Sarah
Bob Hughes - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: Specialized Tricross. Mine's done Madrid - Clermont Ferrand (800 miles), Madrid - Santander (300 miles), done some light off-road single track, a couple of long one-day rides and been hacked about the city as an occasional commuter. It's brilliant. Really comfy (I put a Brookes saddle on it), reasonably but not wildly fast (faster than my mate's touring bike anyway) and pretty much bomb-prof. Got all the braze-ons for panniers and mud-guards. I paid 550euros for mine second hand.
mike kann - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: How much do you want to spend? Having a ti roadie marks you out as not the normal customer!
sarahjk - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to mike kann:

The Ti bike is from 'back in the day' when I lived in Texas and was married. Now [happily] a single parent in Lancashire.

However I was obviously spoilt to the finer things; reviewing the bikes on offer built up I am suprised at the low end groupos used on what is sold as the top bike.

Guess I should of started with tourer vs cyclo-x too? I want robust quality and light weight....

Budget is 'flexible' as it is mostly window shopping and education at this point.
OffshoreAndy - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast:
I'm thinking of getting this : Cannondale CAADX 5 105 Compact 2012 Cyclocross Bike
Cuthbert on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast:

I have an On-one Pompetamine with the Shimanno Alfine 8 speed hub. I really like it although I would warn you that their customer service is the worst I have ever experienced.
sarahjk - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to Saor Alba: I was looking at the On One frame as it is on sale right now. What size did you get and how tall are you ?
Cuthbert on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast:

I am 175cm tall and 71kg. I think it was the medium which seems fine although I turned the stem upside down to get more raise on the handlebars.

In reply to Saor Alba:
> I really like it although I would warn you that their customer service is the worst I have ever experienced.

Oh dear - how did it go so wrong? PlanetX/On-One have been helpful to me in the past buying bits and bobs from them and I'm thinking about getting an OnOne mtb.
Cuthbert on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to TobyA:

They took my money, they didn't order a bike. I alerted them to this but they forgot again to order the bike. I alerted them to this, they forgot to order the bike. It arrived 6 months after I paid for it with the wrong tyres. They sent me replacements (free) but they were the wrong size and didn't fit so they then sent me a third set which finally worked.

I ordered and paid for the bike in July 2011 and got it in December 2011.
Jim Lancs - on 17 Aug 2012
Particularly as you live in Lancashire, it would be worth going down to Paul Hewitt in Leyland. (www.hewittbikefitting.co.uk) They produce extremely well regarded tourers in both steel (and titanium), and in the full spectrum from credit card tourers / audax bikes to full on tourers. Their price guide is around 1200 or so. I think you would be able to get most of this back by selling your road bike.

The big advantage of buying from Hewitts is that is includes a proper fitting and there's nothing that helps on a long ride than having a bike that fits. The only other bit of advice is to not over-do the 'ruggedness'. Some of the 'expedition bikes' sold are stupidly heavy and are horrible to ride unloaded. A good touring bike is fun to ride, but stable loaded, adequately strong, and with good clearances for larger tyres, mudguards, heel clearance on rear panniers, widest range of gears (20 to 100+ inches) and front forks that can take front lowriders, which are great for spreading any size load (not only big ones) on a touring bike. Not all tourers / cyclecross bikes have this versatility.

Many people think the wheels in particular have to be heavy to be bomb proof, but again this is wrong. Wheels have to be well built to be bomb proof and Hewitts are the best wheel builders out there. Overly heavy rims and tyres just kill the fun of riding, and by your description of your past bike and rides, I'm assuming you enjoy the riding, rather than just plodding along on a bicycle.
mike kann - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: It depends on whether you mean a true cyclocross frame - which generally have no mudguards, pannier mounts and are stiff as a 15 year old in a skinflick, or onr of the modern "crossers" which come with all mod cons. Selling your ti frame could land you with a fair wedge of cash to get a really nice frame - your groupo can be reused especially if it has light use only. There's loads of good brands out there that would suit you - steel frames are much less harsh than alu for long distance riding and will give a similar feel to the titanium although heavier. Whatever, get disc wheels as cx cantilevers are pap, and if you really want to do some offroad makesure that the wheels are good and strong 32 spoke wheels - 18 spoke jobbies last all of 10 minutes off road. If you get disc wheels, you will need a higher spoke count anyway. Brands to check out are Salsa, surly, on-one, genesis, cotic amongst many others... as I say for what you would get for a ti frame, you could build yourself a really nicely speced bike...
Fraser on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to Bob Hughes:
> (In reply to sarahkeast) Specialized Tricross.

I also have one of these and can recommend it. Not done such long trips though, but it's served me very well. Will take mudguards and racks. (I too changed the saddle!)
fiendoidel - on 17 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast:

how tall are you? I have a lemond poprad disc that i might be willing to part exhange with you for your titanium thing. It's a lovely bike and will take a rack. Google it for the spec ( I have put a triple on it). Trouble is i am 6 foot, so our bikes might not fit each other
AlasdairM on 18 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: How heavy touring are you considering? I tour on a rackless Ti road bike, using a Carradice Longflap Camper attached to my Brooks saddle. This is big enough to take some clothes, my tent, sleeping bag and mat, and I am considering a bar bag for a few more things.
Bob Windsor - on 18 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: Spa Cycles in Harrogate do their own titanium tourer and they're allegedly good and good value.
subalpine - on 18 Aug 2012
In reply to AlasdairM:
> Carradice Longflap Camper attached to my Brooks saddle.

that sounds good. no support?
altirando - on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to sarahkeast: I happened to see a Chris Boardman cyclocross bike in Halfords. It looked interesting. (I am currently trying to resist the temptation to buy myself a carbonfibre road bike - been watching too much Tour de France).
AlasdairM on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to subalpine:
> (In reply to AlasdairM)
> [...]
>
> that sounds good. no support?

I use a Carradice Bagman rack that clamps onto the saddle rails, which you just sit the bag onto. However, looking at the bag design I reckon an internal frame from perhaps old tent poles or even a wooden dowel would work really well and reduce the need for the external rack.


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.