/ Rope bag?

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Panick - on 18 Aug 2012
m looking at getting a rope / gear bag.
Ideally its got to be big enough to fit in all my gear for a days cragging and be easy access ie one of those zips all the way down the front.

For around 50ish

What do you use?
And Climb on 18 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick: A rope bag you can fit your gear in or a bag for your gear and a rope? Sorry for being pedantic but it's quite a difference.

I have an edelrid rope bag. Just an ordinary thing. 25 quid and I reckon you can fit a short rope, quickdraws and shoes in.

All my climbing stuff happily goes into a Bergahus arete bag which has a buckle on the top of the drawstring bit to hold a rope in place so you can stuff the rest of it full. It doesn't have a zip down the front. Most places do it for 53 quid.

There were some comparison reviews on here comparing a bunch. I think the Arc'Tyrex bag was favoured but is 3 times what you want to spend.
ashley1_scott - on 18 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick:

Try this one: I got a similar one from Decathlon about a year ago, not listed now tho
http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/edelrid-crag-bag-2-p194166
Panick - on 18 Aug 2012
I think the issue is Im not sure what i want, I currently have an old jackwolfskin rucksack type bag that all my climbing gear goes into. not sure to replace it with something similar or to get a dedicated "climbing specific"bag.

Ive looked at the la sportiva large rope bag and the moon aerial bag. The edelrid one looks ok.
Danzig on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick: Try the DMM Classic, it'll carry a 40m rope, 10 draws & a medium sized rack fully laden, relatively comfy on the shoulders aswell.
Al Randall on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick: The problem is that those that are just that, separate rope bags, usually with over the shoulder straps, can be a pain to carry any distance or if the terrain requires the use of hands to progress. Those that profess to be "rucksack" style don't really make very good rucksacks IMO. I've ended up with two. A BD Slacker which is a good example of the first type, is very quick to pack between routes and does not end up as a lump on your back when packed at the beginning and end of the day because you can flake the rope lengthwise. I tend to use this when the approach is short and easy. I also have an Arcteryx Pali which I like because it also is easy to carry between routes and compresses to a small size to go inside my rucksack. When carried as a bag however it undoubtedly is a cumbersome lump. Both are only ever used for sport climbing. Have you thought about a small tarp and a rucksack with front access? That's what I tend to use on trad climbs and I'm coming round to thinking that it's the best and cheapest all round solution. I think we may have all fallen prey to marketing hype with this particular item especially me as I have a few. :-)

Al
john arran - on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick:

I don't know about you but I don't want to be having to lug all my gear about every time I move the rope from one line to the next at a crag. I prefer a very simple rope bag (Ikea bags are fantastic for this) that I can either carry on my shoulder or stuff in my rucksack if I'm walking any distance.
Al Randall on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to john arran: Agreed that's another of the problems with most of these bags that try to be a rucksack. I would consider a detachable sheet to be an essential feature if I were buying now. That Climbing Technology bag in the review looks quite good but I refuse to be a marketing victim yet again. Now then which bag shall I bring to the Ariege in 4 weeks time. :-)

Al
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Jeremy Crampin - on 19 Aug 2012
In reply to Panick: Climbing technology falesia. You can't go wrong.

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