/ Setting gear without climbing

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stretch1486 - on 28 Oct 2012
Has anyone done this and does it help!
does anyone know any places around lulworth, dorset to do this?

thank you in advance.
Dave Perry - on 28 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486:
I pressume you mean to teach or practice setting up of belays etc.,?

If so, then finding a place you do not have to actually climb at is a good idea as you can concentrate on the technical bits like ropework, belays, knots and so on. Any old bit of boulders, rocks and so on will do.
stretch1486 - on 28 Oct 2012
In reply to Dave Perry: but does it work.
Nutkey on 28 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486:
It was what they got us to do to start with on my "learn to lead" course.

If it does nothing else, it will teach you what number nut corresponds to what size crack, which will save you time when you're balanced on your toenails trying desperately to get some gear in before you dare move your foot to what will almost certainly be a much more comfortable position :)
Kevster - on 28 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486:

I'd say it can work, dependant on your knowledge etc.

If all you want is to equalise anchors then a stone wall is fine, if you want to test it and place meaningful gear, set up an abseil down a 3 foot face. if you wish to climb too etc then set it up somewhere bigger.

Nothing like doing it yourself and then laying your belief on the line.

There is always a lesson to be learnt if you are inexperienced (or experienced). If you lack confidence, doing with someone more authoritive/knowledgeable would bolster you.

Dorset rock can be loose at the tops. Pick stuff you can see isn't detached/shattered to practice on. You will get the same rock at the top of climbs in your area. If in doubt, back it up!
Many trad routes in dorset have stakes, this may be a good place to start - equalising stakes.

Cliff top quarries may prove usefull too.

Have fun, be safe, Kev
PixieNinja - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486: when learning I tried placing gear just on a wall whilst not climbing (managed to get one of my boyfriend's nuts stuck in a crack) but found it much more helpful placing gear whilst top roping or having a confidence rope, its much more realistic. Again with practicing anchors and setting up belays found it a lot more helpful doing it on site under supervison.
Lukas V-L - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to PixieNinja:
(managed to get one of my boyfriend's nuts stuck in a crack)

Ouch!


I'll get my coat...

PixieNinja - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Lukas V-L: It came out with a good tug! lol
deepsoup - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486:
It worked for me. When I got my first bits of gear I spent time wandering around the Burbage valley with them, placing nuts & hexes all over the place, just playing around. I found the whole exercise really helpful.

Actually, the way I've been fumbling to find the right wire lately, I'm starting to think it might do me good to go back to basics and try it again. ;O)
TryfAndy on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to PixieNinja:
> (In reply to stretch1486) (managed to get one of my boyfriend's nuts stuck in a crack)
>

The tightness came as something of a surprise! :p
Mike Lates - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to stretch1486: Definitely and ideally with AN other so you can discuss the merits.
With gear placements I'd suggest concentrating on a single piece for a period rather than the confusion of a whole range of pro for a range of options. Don't forget to clip in & hang on them; any hesitation & it probably isn't very worthwhile.
SeasonalDrip on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to stretch1486:

I did tons of this while learning the ropes. Frequently went out on my own practicing putting protection in. It did wonders for my confidence when I moved into leading routes. Like other people have said though, its best to go with someone experienced a few times and get them to check it and give some feedback. If I was on my own I'd pair it up with some low level traversing to practice my climbing too while staying safe. It's also worth taking a rope or long length of accessory cord to practice equalizing anchors for a belay/abseil. I even used to do this at home using chair legs simulating anchors, just don't try to abseil down the stairs using this technique though. It can only end 1 way.

Hope this helps
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lcullum7 on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to stretch1486: As most other people have said doing this with someone experienced is a great way of learning gear placements and getting more efficient at them when it comes to actually leading.

Also doing it on the ground allows you to discuss placements together rather than trying to remember them when you get to the top of a route or trying to shout at each other halfway up! You can usually get a much better look at the top/bottom/sides of gear too.

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