/ How far can a toddler walk?

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Blunderbuss - on 05 Dec 2012
My son is 2 years 8 months old and like all kids that age loves playing outdoors.

I was thinking of taking him on a hill walk, obviously nothing too strenuous but don't want him to end up collapsing from tiredness.

What's a reasonable distance a kid of this age can manage?
TheDrunkenBakers - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: i dont think you need to worry about his speed. i think you need to worry about how far you can carry him.

cezza - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

on a good day they will walk all day
on bad day they wont walk more than 10 yards

start with something easy and include lots of chocolate and a picnic
Ross McGibbon - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:
Our 20 month-old will walk between half a mile and a mile - but at HER pace and stopping to look at whatever interests her.
Buy or borrow a second-hand baby rucksac (we have Littlelife ones) and alternate - just be prepared to change your plans entirely and don't be fixed on a goal.
lanky_suction1 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

It varies so much from day to day! At 2 years 8 months you will probably find you can carry him a fair distance with a carrier that suits you. The backpack types tend to be heavy with the added weight of the child, so you are better finding something that mimics a sort of hands-free piggyback!

This does take you into the slightly hippy end of the market these things are also not cheap but hold their value really well when you want to sell on.

Your best bet is probably one of the 'full buckle' types of carriers rather than the full on hippy stuff you have to tie. Examples are:

manduca http://www.preciouslittleone.com/product-information/28/17097/manduca-baby-carrier-(petrol)/?gclid=C...

ergo http://store.ergobaby.com

boba http://www.bobafamily.com

connecta http://www.connectababycarrier.com

Babies in space (my current favourite, bulky so doesn't pack down small but so comfy!) http://www.babiesinspace.com

For all of these, you will be looking for a toddler size (maybe a pre-school but toddler will probably be fine), and you will be carrying him on your back (they are better on the front until about 6 months old).

It is a great investment, our youngest is just 2 years old, and wants to walk most of the time. Some days he really doesn't want to, though, and being able to put him on my back comfortably is just great. He loves the view and being able to talk to us at our height. If he is tired he will sleep in it too. I also use it to keep him under control on the school run or if we ever go into town or somewhere busy.

Occasionally, I will still carry the oldest (now 4) if she is really tired, it is so much easier than giving a classic 'piggyback!'.

If you want to 'try before you buy', you may have a local 'sling library' where you can go and try them, and hire them out for a couple of weeks to see how you get on with it. I wouldn't say that any are better then any of the others, it is a really personal thing about what feels comfortable for you. If you want to find out your nearest, let me know where you are and I will be able to find it for you!

Sorry for the essay! Hope it helps.
timjones - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:
> My son is 2 years 8 months old and like all kids that age loves playing outdoors.
>
> I was thinking of taking him on a hill walk, obviously nothing too strenuous but don't want him to end up collapsing from tiredness.
>
> What's a reasonable distance a kid of this age can manage?

They'll walk further than you think with the occasional shoulder ride to aid progress but I would consider a more level walk first. The world is an exciting place when you explore it with a 2 year old you don't need to head for the hills IME.

Heike - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:
At roughly that age, I managed to get our son up our local hill under his own steam (He'd been up it in the backpack loads of time before). It is about 2 km and involves about 250m of ascent (you can drive halfway up). I had to carry him down though because he was tired and he promptly fell asleep.

It depends, I'd say. He is now 3 1/2 years and we take him regularly on hill walks (big ones as well), quite often we carry him up and he walks down or we alternate walking and on shoulders, but he is getting a bit heavy for that so the backpack is still preferable. All walks invariable involve loads of treats! He doesn't like it if it's too windy as he gets cold.

I think it also depends on the child, some don't like walking and others love it. Go and find out!
Monk - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

As others have said, it's fairly unpredictable. I think that my daughter managed to walk about a mile at that age (both uphill and on the flat) but it was very dependent on what there was to do or see during that time. Sometimes she wouldn't walk more than a couple of hundred metres before she wanted carrying (either in our arms, on my shoulders or in a child carrier). My daughter's first 'mountain' she walked up was Hallin Fell above Ullswater. http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=343500&y=519500&z=120&sv=hallin+fell&st=3&t... She walked up under her own steam, but wanted to be carried down and fell asleep in her aunt's arms. She was about 2 years 8 months at that time.
ChrisJD on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

They'll walk the length of a piece of string....

Ergos are the way to go for carrying (in dry weather)

http://store.ergobaby.com/

!! WATCH OUT FOR FAKES - LOADS ON EBAY !!
lanky_suction1 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ChrisJD:

True, you can email ergo direct with the serial number to find out if it is one of theirs. If you are looking for a second hand bargain, remember they are expensive for a reason! If it is too good to be true, it probably is ;-)
lanky_suction1 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

I have one of these to sell (in blue). 110.
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/H84AqjVm-ga_oRTFpxoPcw
Nutkey on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:
My daughter was walking up to a mile on the flat (there isn't anywhere hilly) at that age. At 2yrs and 9months she made it about 10m up the steep side of Thorpe Cloud, and then decided she'd had enough. Then her legs lengthened out a bit (though she's still quite short). At about 3yrs and 2 months she had a go at Cat Bells and got as far as the saddle. A couple of weeks later she walked up Loughrigg from Rydal (this took A Long Time, and I carried her down). Looking forward to summer 2013.





Bjartur i Sumarhus on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ChrisJD: Are they any good for a (nearly) 3 yr old like the OP has? I reckon they are for babies, not toddlers.I wouldn't want to carry a 3 yr old on my chest...I reckon a backpack style one would be better and it also has decent storage for drinks/snacks etc.
lanky_suction1 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers:

See my long post!
M0nkey - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: I agree with the general advice to get a rucksack carrier. i have one and have been carrying my daughter round in it since she was 5 months old (a bit too young but she is sturdy). She is now just about 2 and while i still carry her in it, i don't think i could manage a long hike with her in it. It's not the weight of her but the way the weight is distributed. If she falls asleep which she always does, then she will flop to one side, then i have to hike with a massive off set load on my shoulders which really wears you down.
Jus - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

Depends on what they are used to.

If they are pushed everywhere in a buggy or carried everywhere then they wont be very fit.
lummox - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: Our 18 month old varies from walking 1-1.5 kms on the moor ( very slowly ) to pointing at his papoose and pretty much refusing to walk. Good luck ; )
Blunderbuss - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Jus:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss)
>
> Depends on what they are used to.
>
> If they are pushed everywhere in a buggy or carried everywhere then they wont be very fit.

He can walk to the local shops and back no problem, that's about 2 miles. He is no 'couch kid'!

In reply to everyone else: thanks for the replies and advice.
ebygomm - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: My 3 year old niece can manage 2 miles no problem (including hills) but declared the walk between the jubilee and metropolitan line at baker street "a long way for a 3 year old"
ChrisJD on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers:

Don't use as front carrier - changes round as back carrier.

Wiush we had one for our first lad (bought big macpa)
Carolyn - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

Ergo and similar are great for a 2 or 3 year old on your back - weight's much closer in to the adult, and easier to handle than in a big framed carrier.
(Although woven wraps are even comfier, and even more hippy!)

Anyhow, so much depends on the motivation. Geocaching, orienteering courses, Easter egg hunts - anything with lots of little steps to aim for can help a lot. Bashing every frozen puddle with an ice axe worked well last weekend.....
sculptor - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: I'm amazed that you are asking such a question about your own child.

Surely you can assess your sons capabilities and make up your own mind. What exactly do you think an Internet forum is going to provide above and beyond your knowledge of your own son and his development?

How about just take him out for a bit of a walk and when he gets tired and doesn't want to walk anymore you could post a thread about how far someone should take their 2 yr 8 month old child for their first walk?

Sorry to be blunt but this is beyond ridiculous.

Have a great time with your son dude...whatever you choose to do

Jenny C on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: My parents are keen walkers so I was used to being dragged out walking each weekend from a very early age - just after my fourth birthday I could manage 13 miles.

Lots of sweets (to keep energy levels up) and pick somewhere interesting with things to entertain the little one - looking for wildlife, "climbing" rocky outcrops, studying the geology etc all break up the day and add interest.
Carolyn - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Jenny C:

I think there's also often a point at which they suddenly start walking a reasonable distance - my older one suddenly stopped moaning and started walking a good few miles without complaint sometime before 4 & 5, just before he started school. I remember walking a friend's kid up Snowdon at a similar age (the 2.5 year old walked about half, and I carried her on my shoulders the other half - she'd decided I was her best friend, and only I was allowed to carry her..... toddlers!!)
ChrisJD on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to sculptor:

> ...whatever you choose to do

They have 'chosen' to come on here to chat things over. So 'to be blunt', it is none of your business to judge that.
Blunderbuss - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to sculptor:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss) > Sorry to be blunt but this is beyond ridiculous.


You don't have to apologise for being blunt but I don't think it is that ridiculous trying to get other peoples experiences with their kids.

I wasn't expecting someone to say 'Your son will be able to walk 4.6miles and ascend 1000ft before collapsing' ;-)
Jenny C on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to ebygomm:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss) My 3 year old niece can manage 2 miles no problem (including hills) but declared the walk between the jubilee and metropolitan line at baker street "a long way for a 3 year old"

I remember being much the same as a kid, smooth easy paths were (and still are) boooooooring and a real struggle.

"Climbing" on hands and knees up Grindsbrook, or bounding over the peat hags on the top of Kinder with me navigating (under Dad's watchfull eye) on a compass bearing was just good fun.
ellis - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:

Typically much further with a friend than without!
smallclimber - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss:
Our daughter is 2 yrs 4 months.

I don't think the question is how far he "can" walk, but how far "will" he walk. And the answer to that is different on different days. My daughter walks pretty well with me becouse she knows I can't carry her, but if Dad is there she hardly walks a step becouse she knows if she just complains the tinyiest bit she will get to go on his shoulders. And in fairness she can see a lot better from up there.
So I would consider an out and back trip and don't go any further than you know you can carry him back if thats what it comes to.
angry pirate - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to sculptor:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss) I'm amazed that you are asking such a question about your own child...

I'm not, I was tempted to start a similar post myself.
My three year old will happily walk a few kilometres if in the right frame of mind / properly motivated with sweets but will then announce that he wants carrying. Usually he can be distracted for a while longer then it's on to the shoulders.
He will happily run all the way to and from nursery however, a distance of almost a kilometre either way!
Heike - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to angry pirate:

Ahh, there is an interesting thought, running,...I have quite often managed to get my son places by runnnig rather then walking. He'd say, I am tired, can you carry me? Response: Shall we do a race and suddenly he can ran for miles. We did a nice 2km run the other day like that (with a few breaks). Walking can just be a bit boring sometimes, so it's another tool in the book (of parenthood, coaxing and bribery)
Andrew Smith - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to sculptor:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss) I'm amazed that you are asking such a question about your own child.
>

Having a bad hair day are we?

To the OP, not a daft question. My Son could walk 3-4 miles when he was 3 years old. Then other days, winge when we was walking to the bus stop. Of course he is Ten now, and walking to the TV to pick up the XBOX controller is considered a chore.

Cheers

Andy
RobertHepburn - on 07 Dec 2012
For some reason I remember it being about a mile a year e.g. a five year old can go about 5 miles. They will be slower than adult pace, find the maximum distance really tiring, and if they are anything like our kids prefer frequent stops to continuous walking. Nicer if you have time to spare and lots of snacks to keep them going. Good luck!

Robert
EeeByGum - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: Our son is the same age as yours and we have currently walked up two mountains (as he calls it). We walked up Hen Cloud one beautiful August day and had a picnic at the top and more recently we walked up Mam Tor having parked on the main road just beneath. He walked the whole way both times. I am sure he is capable of doing miles and miles, but he needs constant encouragement and help otherwise he just stops and wants to be carried.

Have fun!
FrankW on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to smallclimber:
> (In reply to Blunderbuss) I don't think the question is how far he "can" walk, but how far "will" he walk. And the answer to that is different on different days. My daughter walks pretty well with me becouse she knows I can't carry her, but if Dad is there she hardly walks a step becouse she knows if she just complains the tinyiest bit she will get to go on his shoulders. And in fairness she can see a lot better from up there.
> So I would consider an out and back trip and don't go any further than you know you can carry him back if thats what it comes to.

+1 I have children of 2 1/2 and 4 1/2. I agree with this entirely. Take plent of cake, warm food and understand what thier objectives are (Unlikley to be the same as yours). Mine will go a lot further where there are rocks to scramble over, dragon caves to explore etc. Be prepared for it all to go pear shaped or that they may want to discuss every stick, leaf or stone in great detail. At that age you'll do much better in cultivating a love of being outside which will encorage them to return.

To get a good walk or climb in these days we've found it's better to pair up with another family and have a tag team effort with child care.
subalpine - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Blunderbuss: what's a good distance for 18 months?

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