/ Walking poles keep freezing

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kbow265 - on 07 Dec 2012
I have a pair of Leki poles with twistlocks, which have worked fine all summer but have started to freeze up on winter walks.

Apart from buying new poles with a different system or not using them, is there anything I can do to stop this happening?
Darren Jackson - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:

The Inuit used to pee on theirs.
ben b - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58: Dry them out in between times - gets rid of many twistlock issues.

Then change them for some flicklocks (maybe carbon fibre ones if you are feeling flush)!

b
Ben Sharp - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58: Yeah give them a really good dry out on the radiator, are they the orange gromet ones or the newer ones with a screw coming out the top?
Take off the gromet and blast everything with compressed air if possible, I periodically smooth mine down with fine wire wool as well.
JIB - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58: Flicklock systems work best in winter conditions.

Any moisture inside the twistlock systems is liable to freeze (think about the poles getting wet during the walk-in), irrespective of how well you dry them out in between usage.

Shearwater - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Darren Jackson:
> The Inuit used to pee on theirs.

The Inuit use telescopic hiking poles? Well I never.

To the OP: does it actually matter if they freeze up? So long as they aren't collapsing in use they're still perfectly good hiking poles, right?

I go for flicklock stuff myself, and I've never had any mechanical issues with those.
Gael Force - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Shearwater: Not if you try doing a route with a pole frozen and extended as my partner did on Green gully recently..
Dave Perry - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:
WD40 +/ Anti-freeze dripped or sprayed into the joints.
Crimpchimp - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Dave Perry: Not a good plan using WD40. Twistlocks use friction which WD40 trys to eliminate. Anti Freeze.... maybe?

Get a good average length and leave them set up, if you don't need them, carry in a gloved hand. If you are using the poles for approaching routes and then swapping for ice tools, get flick lock poles, then its easier to collapse.
Jamie B - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:

Keeping them clean definitely helps, or you could carry a wee can of de-icer.

Are you trying to adjust length or collapse them completely for "hands-on" sections or climbing? For the latter I used to just dismantle them completely and put the sections inside my sack, but this was not as good a fix as getting a pair of BD flick-locks.
wilkie14c - on 09 Dec 2012
redscotti - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Crimpchimp: worked for me to free jammed twistlocks. Gave them a wipe with kitchen towel and grip fine now.....
bouldery bits - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:

WD40 will keep the moisture off. That might help :)
LJC - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58: Doesn't de-icer eat fabric climbing gear?
Jonay - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:

take a pair of mole grips with you?
Jamie B - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to florence58:

The reality is that Black Diamond poles are infinitely superior for winter use.
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martinph78 on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Jamie Bankhead: Agree :)

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