/ Patagonia Mixed Guide Pants

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Milesy - on 11 Dec 2012
I am in the market for a pair of smart looking for functional trousers. I am sick of the usual drab black and fancy getting something in a bright colour.

Been looking at these : http://www.urbanrock.com/mens-mixed-guide-pants

Now the big question is - how well do they really cope with Scottish winter? Ot talks about weather on The Ben in that description but how do they really hold up to driving rain and sleet while ascending to the snow line? My decathlon soft shells failed miserablely in wind driven wet snow going up to Sneachda last year and ended up getting really wet and cold and had to bail off my route on the first pitch.

Any other suggestions? Want them to be bright. Crampon patches. Preferably a bib or braces but not essential.
G Graham - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy:
I have an older version of those and a new jacket of the same fabric. Best money I've ever spent on outdoor clothing. Patagonia are snubbed at because it's expensive "designer" gear. But their gear and pedigree is good and if you can get a sale, go for it. The trousers are tough, pretty much waterproof and very comfortable and warm. I use them for icefalls, UK winter and have never had a problem.
Shearwater - on 11 Dec 2012
I've found powershield to be a fair bit more wind and rainproof than more conventional stretch-weave fabrics, and I suspect it is a bit less prone to retaining water when soaked through, too.

That's not to say it won't eventually end up cold, wet and nasty in prolonged rain, but what doesn't? I'd expect them to outlast your Decathlon trews in the same conditions, at least.

Decent brightly coloured gear seems awkward to come by. You should get these and let us know how they work out ;-)
Nath93 - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: Those are some seriously sexy trousers ! I've just got a pair of Trangoworld in a similar colour but I doubt they'll be anything in quality to those !
The Ex-Engineer - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: They look a fantastic bit of kit and I think I'd be happy wearing they doing Winter routes on the Ben.

I'd very likely buy a pair if I didn't look like they would be 2" too short for me!
Milesy - on 25 Dec 2012
The store here only seems to stock small ones in red.

Anyone else have an idea of where to get larger ones in red?

many thanks
Morgan Woods - on 25 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: I have the older version of the backcountry guide pants and really love em, esp for ski tours where the lighter ( now defunct) color comes into its own on hot days. Good kit and the ones in the link look pretty sweet too but I prefer ones with braces. I thought soft shells are generally a better idea in the alps as opposed to scotland.
Morgan Woods - on 25 Dec 2012
In reply to Morgan Woods: also just curious if this is a brand new product and they only have small left did they not order enough err normal sizes?
philhilo - on 25 Dec 2012
In reply to Morgan Woods: Nice to see someone having a 'normal' mans small, being a 29 - 31 waist. Usually have to buy womens size 8!
iksander on 25 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: These look great. I've got the older Mixed Master and Backcountry Guide trousers and they're both top drawer. But they will wet out after a long period of heavy windblown rain. I use very light windproof trousers over the top when it's chucking down to keep the wind off and reduce windchill, then sack them when you hit the snow.
Denni on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy:

My friend had these issued to him for ski patroling in canada and he loves them. I know the weather isn't that wet and miserable on the hill sthere compared to the Ben but he spent the whole day guiding back country touring in constant heavy snow and didn't get wet.

He uses them for ski touring, ice climbing, skiing you name it and he loves them. I think they got a slightly less tweaked version before they went on general sale and he reckons they are the best thing. Before that they used back country pants which he still uses and are also excellent.

He comes over to the UK to winter climb and walk every couple of years and he has used the backcountry pants with long johns and carries a pair of lightweight over torusers just in case he feels he is getting soaked but he has never said yet that he has beeen soaked.

His are slightly modified with an old bib and braces from another old pair of salopettes that he had professionally attached, which is an excellent idea.

HTH, Den
Milesy - on 26 Dec 2012
Thanks folks. Just got to find them in the right size.

Can anyone tell me what the orange Patagonia trousers which Matt Helliker wears on the Moonflower DVD? There is a picture in the following article.

http://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/news.php?id=4119
Andy_B39 - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: i think they were last years colour for the super alpine salopetes
CurlyStevo - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: the only stretchy soft shells that dont damp out in the rain and sleet have a membrane in them and then you may as well have normal soft shell and a cheap pair of waterproof trousers imo.
CurlyStevo - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to Milesy: the knee and arse patches on the patagonia back coutry guide pants will get trashed in Scotland.
Milesy - on 26 Dec 2012
Looks like I cant get a hold of the orange ones. urban rock arent getting any more stock this season.

Does anyone know if the super alpine bib is too much for scottish winter? I do like braces.
In reply to CurlyStevo:
> (In reply to Milesy) the knee and arse patches on the patagonia back coutry guide pants will get trashed in Scotland.

Why? What did you do to yours?

CurlyStevo - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to TobyA:
I nearly bought some and backed out of it after asking about them on here as others said they did rip theres. The knee and arse patches afterall are just a PU material thats not as hardcore as the re-enforced material on most jackets or indeed my existing waterproof trousers, lets face it these also get ripped pretty easy winter mountaineering in Scotland.
CurlyStevo - on 26 Dec 2012
IMO one of the great advantages to stretchy soft shell is the resistence to tearing and in some cases scuffing too! I have a 7 old year stretchy soft shell lowe alpine jacket that's in great shape considering what it's been through, no holes and hardly any scuffs, my hard shells of the same age are never in that kind of shape with the same useage!
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TeeBee on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to CurlyStevo:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> I nearly bought some and backed out of it after asking about them on here as others said they did rip theres. The knee and arse patches afterall are just a PU material thats not as hardcore as the re-enforced material on most jackets or indeed my existing waterproof trousers, lets face it these also get ripped pretty easy winter mountaineering in Scotland.

For what it's worth, mine have done two or three seasons, I think, without much to show for it. They've not been very busy seasons, and more mixed and thrutchy routes might do them in, but so far I've been pleasantly surprised at how they've held up.

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