/ Anyone used wrist gaiters for ice climbing?

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GridNorth - on 27 Dec 2012
And perhaps more importantly did they work? I'm fed up with getting hot-aches and now I'm getting on a bit I notice the cold even more. Last year I was nearly sick with hot-ache pain in my fingers. I have read that because the veins are near to the surface on the wrist that this contributes significantly towards cold fingers. My Rab Powerstretch top has thumb loops but the fabric tends to rub raw between my thumb and first finger so I have tended not to use them. I would have thought that wrist gaiters would be less prone to doing this as you are not pulling against the fabric every time you reach up.
Cameron94 on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: The thing that would concern me using wrist gaiters with axes would be creating presure points from the seams. You don't know til you've tried though
chrisprescott - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: Try sweat bands for general warmth and if it's particularly cold get some of those disposable handwarmer satchets and put them inside the sweat band on the palm side of the wrist, works a treat.
andyd1970 - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: It may sound stupid but what about sports wrist bands under your jacket/glove!
wilkie14c - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: If you are suffering that badly you need to formulate a plan that is workable and avoid the hot aches altogether.
I'm a sufferer but rarely suffer these days as I've addressed the problem. I can't allow my hands to get too cold too quickly so gearing up is done in small stages with hand warming 5 mins between each stage ie. harness and helmet then warm up, cramps on then warm up, tie in and clip gear to harness then set off. The biggest improvement I've made without a doubt is going leashless as the leashes were restricting blood flow and now its so much better. Not had bad aches for a couple of seasons now.
wheelo - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: yes, they are great. Marmot do them, think I paid a tenner for mine
kermit_uk - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

I suffer terribly from cold hands. Mild Raynard doc said. I winter climb snowboard and climb all year round. I have a pair of marmot wrist gaiters and love em powerstretch is great and the thumb is properly shaped notjust a slit. So it doesnt rub or put any pressure on the skin. Good mitts to keep my hands warm too help.
George Fisher - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

Yeah. Marmot ones.... Great.

They don't rub on axe handles. Make gloves quite snug in the cuff but not really a problem.
Flat4matt - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

Bought some soft microfleece wrist warmers afew weeks ago. They make a massive difference for me when its really chilly.
Like said above, the seams may be a problem on axes or poles but havent tried this yet.
Paid about 6quid for mine and love em!!
GridNorth - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: Thanks for the replies. Just ordered some from Facewest. There were plenty of reviews and everyone raved about them. Lookout Alps, here I come. :-)
KeithW - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

I've been using cavers' neoprene wrist gaiters for years. They don't have the thumb holes but they stay warm when wet and keep Scottish sleet from running down my arms.
ice.solo - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

yep, ive got some windpro ones. made for winter runners. love em, just a pain in the ass when you dont want them on as they are a hassle to take off and put on again.
Baron Weasel - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: The right gloves solved the problem for me.

I used to suffer aweful hot aches until, upon recommendation I got some of these.

http://shop.snowshepherd.co.uk/Venitex-Leather-Gloves-size-8

They are rough and ready, but by jingo they work.

blanchie14c's advice is right on the money too, be very aware of how cold you get at times and make a strategy to deal with it/manage it.
alan1234 - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

Yes wrist warmers make an incredible difference as you will find out.

In general its all about never letting them get too cold - rack up and put crampons on in your walk-in gloves (cheapo fleece ones are often fine), top rope first if possible in mitts to warm the hands up, shake out lots even if not pumped to keep the blood flowing, and if they are getting cold warm them up by your chest if possible (has to be skin touching skin).

Also.. if you keep your body cool to prevent sweating your hands will be colder; getting a bit too hot can be fine when cragging and will keep warm blood going to the hands. Try wearing an extra layer!

Obviously don't follow all of this if you're way away from civilisation as it has the potential to get the core wet and cold, which can of course be dangerous, but I find down to about -20C I don't get hot aches and I'm a skinny guy!

Alan
http://www.fjellogpadleskole.no/

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