/ Approach/Technical Shoes

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StuartCJones - on 29 Jan 2013
I'm in the market for some technical approach and low grade climbing shoes. I'm currently looking at the following:

La Sportiva Boulder X
Addidas Terrex Swift Solo

Any recommendations?
anaesthetic on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

5.10 Camp Four, great for approach/descents, very grippy soles but fairly round toe. I've climbed diffs in rain no problem (except slightly wet feet by end of day). I've had issue with durability of sole/toe rand interface which means they now leak (not that they're very waterproof anyway) but I have been wearing them every day as they're a really comfy shoe. In summary - great approach/low grade climb shoe for dry conditions.
Climbing Pieman on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:
Mammut Redburn with or without GTX lining depending on preference/use.
http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/Gear-Reviews/Search-Results/Footwear/Mammut-Redburn-2011/
PMG on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

Salewa MTN Trainer. Very stable light approach shoe.
LaMentalist on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

I've got a pair of La Sportiva Trango Light Low which are very similar to the Boulder X in design they are good shoes well made but seem really heavy . I've climbed some short 5b & 5Cs in them but wouldn't like to try any harder routes wearing these , way to chunky for serious climbing I'd say .

Think next time I may try some Scarpa Crux or the adidas terex solos .
Nic DW - on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

Have owned 5.10 Prodigy/camp 4s for years, and when the current pair wears out i will almost certainly by another without looking elsewhere. Great all rounder, smear beautifully and despite being "not waterproof" do a pretty good job of keeping water out on approaches. They don't edge very well, but then they are a trainer!
AlanLittle - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Nic DW:

I wear 5.10 Camp 4s for things like alpine ridge scrambles up to about UIAA IV or so, for which I find them very good. One thing to watch out for in the UK might be the rounded & rather bulky heel on grassy & muddy descents. And they're quite big; I generally choose something else for routes where 'm going to be wearing rock shoes and carrying shoes for the descent.

Saw loads of people in the Dolomites last summer in La Sportiva Gandas, but they are (a) very expensive and (b) more "climbing shoes that aren't completely crippling to walk in" rather than "walking shoes in which one can climb a bit". If that makes sense.
Solaris - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

I'm pleased with my Boulder Xs in similar use to what you anticipate. The toe box is quite narrow (and I have fairly narrow feet) which means that they are not the warmest in cold conditions when not moving.
cap'nChino - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones: 5:10 insights for me. Love them. Not sure if they still make them though. I think the camp 4s have taken over.

Not water proof and not good for edging, but very sticky soles and very comfortable.
redsonja - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones: 5.10s are the best. incredibly grippy and look cool
In reply to StuartCJones:

A lot of our instructors and route setters use Boulder Xs, they love them for the durability. They're a really solid build, nice and grippy too.
due - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

I have a pair of the Adidas ones, not climbed in them but they have a smooth sole under the toe so imagine they are quite good. Comfy and light as approach shoes too. They do fit funny though, rather narrow and need sizing up. Plenty of B-grades on eBay for 30-50.

Mind you, for rougher ground or lots of walking it's Camp 4s all the way.
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Jayhigh - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to StuartCJones:

If you're not wading through too much mud on your 'approach', I think the Evolv Cruzer might be worth a look. Grippy low profile sole, which is good enough for easy routes, and they're light, come in funky colours and have a loop to karabiner them to your harness.

And when I got them they were significantly cheaper than some other, admittedly more burly, approach shoes that were more like light hiking boots.

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