/ Stove recommendations.

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James Malloch - on 13 Apr 2013
I need to get a stove for 6 weeks of camping and cooking. Ideally it would be pretty light to keep weight down as it will be taken on a plane.

I have no idea about them at all so please fire suggestions with any reasons at me!

Thanks
James
Rock Badger on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

Need to make sure you can get appropriate fuel at destination
James Malloch - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: Good point, thanks! If anyone knows what fuel you can get around Ceuse, then that's what I'll be needing.
ice.solo - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

for that period and liquid gas thats easy to procure, consider a soto muka.
expensive, but very good build quality, small and light.
good for planes as it burns so cleanly theres negligible build up of gunk. keeps you stuff clean too.
i pair mine with the pot from a reactor. heavy, but thermo efficient.

if supply is no issue then a jetboil sumo ticks a lot of boxes.
Rock Badger on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

http://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/antigravitygear_katahdin_stove_set.html

runs off meths,,, mate has one super light and simple
Nic DW - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

I swear by my MSR whisperlite international. Burns petrol- cheap and widely available. Heats up fast unlike meths and compaired to gas much better in bad weather, much cheaper to run and dosnt loose power as the cylinder gets emptied. About 500 g i think, there are a number of similar variations made by MSR and primus.
LJC - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: Don't even consider meths for 6 weeks of cooking. It will do your head in. If you like cooking, go for a good burner with hose and separated fuel source. Only had experience with MSR and Primus - whisperlite, XGK, omnifuel, something like that. You can get regular gas easily in europe which burns cleanly and doesn't leave much of a residue or smell for airport staff to get iffy about.

Jetboils are great if you just want hot water, but any complicated cooking is much harder.

I would go for steel or hard anodized pots over super light titanium or aluminum as they stand up better over time and are less likely to burn your dinner. You could also consider buying a cheap frying pan when you arrive and ditch it before you fly back.
damowilk on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to ice.solo:

The Soto stoves look good, trying to justify the cost! Maybe I need to actually be going on a trip where I'd use it first.

martinph78 on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: Primus Omnifuel or similar should do the job. I've used mine in India and Peru.

marsbar - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=256

You will have to buy fuel when you are there, so why not make life easy and buy a gas stove when you get there. Decathalon or somewhere will have them. Petrol stoves are great if you are going somewhere remote or cold, but if you are going to France for the summer a gas stove would be easier and cheaper to buy, although gas is more expensive.
no_more_scotch_eggs - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to LJC:

Msr dragonfly. 12 years on, still runs perfectly, rapid boil, easily controlled flame intensity, unleaded petrol widely available...!
James Malloch - on 15 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: Many thanks for the recommendations! I think I'll go for one with a fuel hose rather than an all in one.

I didn't realise that there was a Decathlon in Gap either, does anyone have an idea how much a stove might cost out there (compared to UK prices)?
IPPurewater on 16 Apr 2013
SCC - on 16 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:
> (In reply to James Malloch) Many thanks for the recommendations! I think I'll go for one with a fuel hose rather than an all in one.
>

100% agree with this. If you can get one with a "preheater" or "anti-flare" system it means you can get the most out of each cannister (turn them upside down when they are running low) and it makes it a lot safer (if the cannister is knocked over the stove doesn't flare up).

This one has that system (you can see the brass pipe next to the burner head):
http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/primus-express-spider-stove-97110075?id_colour=180

but you can get cheaper versions that still have this feature.

Looks like you can get the crew on cannisters easily enough in Decathlon (they sell stoves that use them) but if you're worried you can get an adaptor that lets you use the blue piercable ones with a screw on stove.

Unless you're REALLY struggling for weight I'd probably get the stove in the UK rather than have to go with whatever Decathlon have in stock when you get there.

HTH

Si
James Malloch - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: Thanks for the reply and advice!

Does this look okay? http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/primus-gravity-ii-ef-pz-stove-97210017?_$ja=tsid:45886&gclid=CMyi...

Comes in at 55ish with student discount. Had a look at one earlier and it seems to have a good solid base and has decent features.

Has anyone used one before?
davidbeynon - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

They are pretty good as gas stoves go. Not a bad price either.
LastBoyScout on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

Primus Omnifuel - runs on anything :-)
SCC - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:
> (In reply to James Malloch) Thanks for the reply and advice!
>
> Does this look okay? http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/primus-gravity-ii-ef-pz-stove-97210017?_$ja=tsid:45886&gclid=CMyi...
>

Looks perfect for what you want IMO.
I've used very similar stoves and the only thing I can possibly think of to look out for is using it on dry grass - it'll burn the grass under the burner but I've never had a real issue.

If you're going somewhere remote then a multifuel stove makes sense - but I never use mine in the UK / Europe any more - gas is so much cleaner and more convenient.

Si
James Malloch - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: I think I'll give it a go then, thanks!

Next, to find some pans....
captain paranoia - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

There are alternatives to be found on auction websites. Fire Maple, for instance, make a range of decent stoves (including manufacture for 'named brands'), and they're often to be found. Google the name for reviews; quite a few of these sort of stoves have been tried out by the stovies on OutdoorsMagic, including bulk buys for youth groups, etc. e.g.

http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/gear/lightest-remote-canister-stoveand46/31044.html
ads.ukclimbing.com
captain paranoia - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to captain paranoia:

Another OM discussion on cheap stoves

http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/gear/vango-ultralite-stoves/36296.html
NottsRich on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch: A vote for the Primus Omnifuel.

Whatever you get, make sure you get some good practice with it before hand as they can be a little fiddly until you understand them fully. If you're reliant on it in a big way then take a spare parts kit (seals, grease, jets etc).

If you're flying with it, make sure it is spotless and smell-less before you pack it away. The smell of petrol in a bottle is fairly good way of not getting your stove on the plane. I pack the stove spread around my bag, i.e. stove, pump, bottle, bottle lid all in different areas. Not hidden, just scattered. Apparently coke is good for washing out fuel bottles and stoves, but I've not tried it. You may want to clean the bottle and stove and wrap them in a sealed plastic bag, as if you've just bought it new from a shop. Just an idea, but I'm paranoid about having important bits of cookers confiscated!
nickcutter85 - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to James Malloch:

MSR Whisperlite - easy to service and quick boil time but there is an art form to getting food to simmer....

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