/ Calling Aiguille Alpine Cirrus users

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IainMunro on 16 May 2013
I'm thinking of getting a Cirrus for my do everything bag. It's time my old beaten up Mountain Equipment rucksack which is now almost 12 years old took a backseat and came along camping rather than thrutching up icy chimneys. I replaced it with a POD Alpine 40 a couple of years ago which I didn't get along with and subsequently sold so I'm looking for something else.

I've heard only good things about Aiguille bags and in particular the Cirrus.

I'll probably be getting a couple of things modified rather than an off the peg bag so wondered if people who own one could help with a few queries I have?

Is the 33l capacity big enough to (comfortably) pack kit for a winter day in Scotland with rope and helmet in the bag? I don't want to be only just able to pack the bag at the start of the day and end up walking out with everything hanging off the outside after topping out in a hoolie. Is the Stratos going to be a better bet for Scottish winter?

For reference if people have any experience I found the POD 40l to be a perfect volume but I gather the Aiguille Alpine is a "big 33l" or probably more likely an "accurate 33l", maybe not far off size wise?

Does anyone have any other rucksacks that they have found to be comparable in size? Osprey, Deuter or Karrimor etc?

Is the webbing belt comfortable when carrying a fully packed rucksack or do most people get a padded hipbelt added?

Has anyone had an extra underlid pocket added? Is this feasible?

Any other words of advice/food for thought/god or bad experiences?

Thanks

Iain
Mr Fuller on 16 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro:

I can get Scottish winter kit in my bag, yup. It is a tight fit, but not impossible. Everything fits inside except I keep my crampons in a pouch stuck down the side compression straps. I really like this because once you've got your harness and helmet on the bag is empty enough to allow plenty of room for slack-packing at stops. My kit is pretty lightweight and therefore small but nothing stupid.

Not sure on actual capacity, but I've managed to get a lot of kit in my bag. I have done a 4-night wild camp in Scotland with the bag and can fit Alpine climbing gear and bivvy gear in it (with sleeping mat, crampons and helmet on the outside). I've a photo of this if you want to get an idea of what you can fit in it.

Adding a padded hipbelt is pointless in my opinion. Fully-loaded I've never had a problem with bruised hips or it being uncomfortable with the unpadded belt.

They can fit an extra underlid pocket. I'd probably get this done if I were getting another bag made.





TRip - on 16 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro:

> I've heard only good things about Aiguille bags and in particular the Cirrus.

I like them. I have had one since 2006 i think. It'd been used a lot and is now nearing the end of the its' life.
>
> I'll probably be getting a couple of things modified rather than an off the peg bag so wondered if people who own one could help with a few queries I have?

I cut the ice axe loops off. The current version comes with an under lid rope strap. If I was having a new on made I would ask for those two features to be ommited.
>
> Is the 33l capacity big enough to (comfortably) pack kit for a winter day in Scotland with rope and helmet in the bag? I don't want to be only just able to pack the bag at the start of the day and end up walking out with everything hanging off the outside after topping out in a hoolie. Is the Stratos going to be a better bet for Scottish winter?

Short answer no. However, Iif you don't carry too much kit, own skinny 60m ropes then you can get everything in just about. For example if I could get everything I'd need for Point 5 in it no problem. However I'd want a bigger sack for something like the Central Buttress on Beinn Eighe, which requires a bigger rack. Saying that I have climbed The Cassin Ridge on Denali in two days and attempted the Eiger North Wall with mine. The Stratos is a better all round bag for Scottish winter in my view.
>
> I gather the Aiguille Alpine is a "big 33l" or probably more likely an "accurate 33l", maybe not far off size wise?

It's pretty similar in size to an Osprey Mutant 38 if thay is anyhelp.

>
> Is the webbing belt comfortable when carrying a fully packed rucksack or do most people get a padded hipbelt added?

I don't have a problem with it especailly in winter.
>
> Has anyone had an extra underlid pocket added? Is this feasible?

It is feasable, but I wouldn't bother. I reckon you'd struggle to close the sack unless you got Aiguille to increase the lid volume by an inch.
>
> Any other words of advice/food for thought/god or bad experiences?
>
Phone Aiguille and ask to speak to Adrian. Don't email them they aren't that good at responding.


GPN - on 16 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro:
I've had a Cirrus for about 5 years or so. I really like it but it is a bit small to 'comfortably' get stuff in for Scottish winter in my opinion. The webbing waist belt is fine and a padded belt would be a waste of time on a pack of this size.

If past experience is anything to go by then be prepared to wait for a month or two before it turns up though!
Jasonic - on 18 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro: I had one, really friendly service and reasonable price, well made.
However despite being bespoke I found it really uncomfortable. With any rucksack unless you are lucky with the fit I think you need to try before you buy.
IainMunro on 24 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro:

Thanks for all the replies, that's given me some food for thought. I wonder if the Sratos might be a better bet...

heathermeek - on 25 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro: Best bet is to come and see us in staveley! You can have a proper rucksack fitting and customise it to your requirements :-)
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nniff - on 25 May 2013
In reply to IainMunro:

Aig Alpine Zephyr for me for Scotland. Everything fits inside and there's nothing to it when it's empty really. Padded hipbelt too, which folds through the ice axe loops and out of the way for climbing

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