/ Q for SRAM double-tap users

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Marek - on 23 May 2013
I'm contempating a change to SRAM, but...
If I'm busting a gut on a steep climb, can't remember which sprocket I'm in (or even my name at this point), try to change down at the back and find I'm aleady in the lowest gear, do I (a) end up going up a gear to 1-2 or (b) stick in 1-1?

(a) would appear highly undesirable but I'm told this is what happens. Really?
Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

Yes if you're on a hill in the biggest cog on the back and you click normally, you'll drop down a gear - not good.
If you do a slower click though and keep the pressure on until the lever stops and you hear a click - the chain will stay where it is - does this make sense? I probably haven't explained that well.

E
Hat Dude on 23 May 2013
In reply to Enty:

Yep that makes sense

To the OP; I've recently switched to SRAM and have found that if you're really busting a gut, you make damn sure there's no way you only give it one click, you ram it across as far as it'll go!
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Enty:
> (In reply to Marek)
>
> Yes if you're on a hill in the biggest cog on the back and you click normally, you'll drop down a gear - not good.
> If you do a slower click though and keep the pressure on until the lever stops and you hear a click - the chain will stay where it is - does this make sense? I probably haven't explained that well.
>
> E

Not sure I understand. I assumed that once you start of move the lever you commit to a gear change either way. If you're in 1-1 already the only option for the double tap system is then to go to 1-2 (bad). You seem to suggest that I can push the lever in 1-1 and avoid it going to 1-2?
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Hat Dude:
> (In reply to Enty)
>
> Yep that makes sense
>
> To the OP; I've recently switched to SRAM and have found that if you're really busting a gut, you make damn sure there's no way you only give it one click, you ram it across as far as it'll go!

But if you're in 1-1 already what happens then?

Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:
> (In reply to Enty)
> [...]
>
> Not sure I understand. I assumed that once you start of move the lever you commit to a gear change either way. If you're in 1-1 already the only option for the double tap system is then to go to 1-2 (bad). You seem to suggest that I can push the lever in 1-1 and avoid it going to 1-2?

I just tried it. In 1-1 go all the way through to the end of the movement, there's a click and chain stays where it is.

E
Radioactiveman - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

it just clicks and does nothing.

Much prefer sram(force) as the brake lever is purely for braking and is very firm occasionaly I have had the brake lever pull to one side slightly on my other bike(105)as i have braked.
Kimono - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:
Crikey, is Sram so complicated??
Looks like im not ever gonna make that change then
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Enty:
> (In reply to Marek)
> [...]
>
> I just tried it. In 1-1 go all the way through to the end of the movement, there's a click and chain stays where it is.
>
> E

Excellent! That's what I wanted to hear. Just hope it not just your SRAM Red that behave sensibly.
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Radioactiveman:
> (In reply to Marek)
>
> it just clicks and does nothing.
>
> Much prefer sram(force) as the brake lever is purely for braking and is very firm occasionaly I have had the brake lever pull to one side slightly on my other bike(105)as i have braked.

Indeed. I have small hands and my finger only just reach the levers. I have to be quite careful with Shimano that a quick snatch at the lever doesn't just cause the lever to flick inwards.
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to kieran b:
> (In reply to Marek)
> Crikey, is Sram so complicated??
> Looks like im not ever gonna make that change then

No more complicated than the others, just different. It's just that there was one use case I was a bit paranoid about and had been told different bahviours.
Pagan - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

My SRAM Force does the same - push it past the click which would put you up a gear and keep pushing - there's another little click (which would normally be the point where you go down a gear), release the lever, chain stays in the lowest sprocket.
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Pagan:
> (In reply to Marek)
>
> My SRAM Force does the same...

Thanks
Hat Dude on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

Sorry didn't make myself clear, what I meant was that Enty was right

Tested it in anger many times on the EtD last Sunday
Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to kieran b:

It's not complicated at all. Can't see me going back to Shimano unless I find a box of money and can afford Di2.

E
gear boy - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek: all of what Enty says is true, all SRAMS I have used, you just hold the lever across and wait for it to click then you dont change gear

On top of that I find much less issues with alignment with SRAM compared to my missus 105 which I forever seem to be tweaking cable tensions a 1/4 turn to keep it running smooth, I would consider Campag if they got rid of Thumb shifting
Marek - on 23 May 2013
In reply to gear boy:
> (In reply to Marek) all of what Enty says is true, ...
> ... I would consider Campag if they got rid of Thumb shifting

At the risk of going off-topic and opening up a whole new bag of worms...
One reason I'm considering C is exectly for the thumb shifters. I like them! (The other reason is the shape of the hoods).
mikehike on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:
Correct.
It catches me out when cycling in the dark.
Byronius Maximus - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Enty:
> (In reply to kieran b)
>
> It's not complicated at all. Can't see me going back to Shimano unless I find a box of money and can afford Di2.
>
> E

I really like the look of SRAM for the reasons everyone on here has said, but haven't switched as they don't do triples, which I like to have on my Audax bike. My race/TT bike is campag which I really like so am not bothered about changing.
Byronius Maximus - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Marek:
As just said, I really like campag; it just works so well. I can see why people don't like the thumb shifters but I get on with them. They are nothing like the Shimano Sora ones which I find absolutely awful, ergonically.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Byronius Maximus:
> (In reply to Enty)
> [...]
>
> I really like the look of SRAM for the reasons everyone on here has said, but haven't switched as they don't do triples, which I like to have on my Audax bike. My race/TT bike is campag which I really like so am not bothered about changing.

I built a bike last year for Mrs. Ent and I bought the SRAM Apex groupset. It's a compact 50-34 up front and a 12-30 cassette on the rear with a long cage rear mech - works perfect for her and she can ride up brick walls.

E
Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to gear boy:
> (In reply to Marek) all of what Enty says is true, all SRAMS I have used, you just hold the lever across and wait for it to click then you dont change gear
>
> On top of that I find much less issues with alignment with SRAM compared to my missus 105 which I forever seem to be tweaking cable tensions a 1/4 turn to keep it running smooth, I would consider Campag if they got rid of Thumb shifting

Another good reason - I very rarely need to touch the SRAM Red on my race bike but I'm constantly tinkering with the Dura Ace and 105 on my training bike and bad weather hack.

E

Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Byronius Maximus:

http://jedi-sports.de/Groupsets/Groupsets-Road/SRAM-Apex-White-GXP-2x10-Groupset-2013::3464.html

It's a 32 cassette on the back not a 30. In white looks the mutt's nuts on a black carbon frame.

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Byronius Maximus - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Enty:

I did consider that option for the Audax/sportive bike I've just ordered (a Van Nicholas, can't wait :)), but for the pace I ride on really long distance rides, I find that, with a compact, I'm incessantly changing between chainrings or using poor chain lines. With a triple, the 39 middle ring does me for 80-90% of stuff, with the big ring for when I'm trying a bit harder and the granny ring for steeper stuff or when I'm proper knackered. It also means that I can keep a relatively close ratio at the back which I like to have as I can be fussy about my cadence.
Loads of people get on well with them though, so maybe I'll try it out one day.
The only real downside to a triple is that they don't look as cool! The extra weight doesn't.bother me too much on a bike for that kind of purpose.
Enty - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Byronius Maximus:
> (In reply to Enty)
>
> I did consider that option for the Audax/sportive bike I've just ordered (a Van Nicholas, can't wait :)), but for the pace I ride on really long distance rides, I find that, with a compact, I'm incessantly changing between chainrings or using poor chain lines. With a triple, the 39 middle ring does me for 80-90% of stuff, with the big ring for when I'm trying a bit harder and the granny ring for steeper stuff or when I'm proper knackered. It also means that I can keep a relatively close ratio at the back which I like to have as I can be fussy about my cadence.
>

Good point - compacts can be crap on rolling terrain. I get pissed off with mine when the club run goes out on the flats. If I've time I stick the 11-21 on.

E

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sharpie530 - on 26 May 2013
In reply to Enty:

I have the SRAM force compact on my road bike. I often use it for triathlons on flat terrain. Is swapping the crankset a silly idea. I sometimes just feel I would like a slightly bigger gear.
Enty - on 26 May 2013
In reply to sharpie530:

Before forking out on a chainset try an 11-21 block on the back. That's what I race on with a compact 50-34 up front. Never needed anything harder than a 50-11 in a flat RR.

E

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