/ Petzl IDs - Over Sensitive Panic Lockout

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Sandstone Stickman - on 12 Jun 2013
Hi,

I've recently purchased a secondhand Petzl ID (The yellow - smaller version with the older style handle). It works ok, but only just. When releasing load its incredibly sensitive. If you pull the handle a fraction further than required to ease the rope, the anti panic auto brake locks on.

Does anyone have any experience of this? It was sold as "Good working order" but i'm not so sure.

Thanks

P.s. I'm using this as a brake for a slackline, not for any work at height so its safe enough in this capacity, but could be difficult to release the tension in the future (If the panic lock comes on any sooner!)
martinph78 on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman: I've recently had training with them and agree, the sweet spot for them is very fine. Lots of practice is required to get the hang of them. It is easier when there's more load on them actually, so if you are just trying it by pulling the rope they seem to be worse for locking up. I don't like them.

Be aware that they can slip also so leave plenty of slack if you are going to tie off the brake line (just to save the knot slipping towards the device).
martinph78 on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman: Should clarify that it sounds to be working normally to me.
Sandstone Stickman - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Martin1978: Thanks, that makes me feel better!

Re the potential slippage, you are re-inforcing my idea of tying off the tail with a locked off munter hitch (As per a releaseable ab) so in the event the rope came tight on the knot, I could still release it!

Thanks
martinph78 on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman: They shouldn't slip much before the lock again, but worth leaving a good loop of slack in case they do (and using a releasable knot as you say).

deepsoup - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman:
What kind of load is on when it's doing that? It's a problem that gets worse as the load is lighter, for example while abseiling down sloping "steep ground" rather than vertically..

That's why the newer version has a button on the handle - holding the button down with your thumb prevents the anti-panic malarky from engaging.

If you try a short vertical abseil and it's ok with bodyweight on it that's probably normal.
cezza - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman:

I'm not sure where you're using it in the slackline system, but the Id is rated for 250Kg ≈ 2.5KN, in the event of a fall during abseiling it is designed to slip ~6KN, a bit of googling seems to indicate that you might tension a slack line to 4 or 5 KN and could generate forces of ~8KN with a bit of jumping.

Cezza

Dave 88 - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman:

Agree with what's been said; really hard to control with lighter weights but a persons body weight in full kit it's no problem.
The Green Giant - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to cezza:

I believe, and my maths could be completely wrong that if you use it in a 4:1 (for example) potentially you're putting only a quarter of the load on the devise. The rest of the load goes onto the anchors. Plus other variables like friction and twists in the rigging ropes.
cezza - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to The Green Giant:

You're right if the ID is the last component in the system, however it could be rigged with the ID as the first pulley.
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Sandstone Stickman - on 12 Jun 2013
In reply to Sandstone Stickman:

Thanks all. I'm using a 5:1 pulley system and then the ID as a brake. There is also a 3:1 multiplier on the tail as well. So I think the above assumptions are correct that the load on the device is only 1/5 of the total load.

I'll do a body weight test using another line as a backup. Cheers for your help.

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