/ Light rope to carry

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Mollythedog - on 22 Jun 2013
Hi,
There's a couple of reviews of lightweight single sport ropes, and based on these I bought a Edelrid Falcon. However when I weighed it, it actually weight as much as my old 10mm rope, both 60m.
So what I want is a rope that's light to carry to the crag, but still 60m. I'm not as worried about the handling as I dont climb hard, and rarely fall, but I do want something that doesn't kill me walking in.
Any help gratefully received,
Sue.
alasdair19 on 22 Jun 2013
In reply to Mollythedog: a beal joker is pretty light, not cheap and handles brilliantly. stretches quite a bit if you fall.
AlanLittle - on 22 Jun 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:

DId you forget to read the grams per metre bit of the reviews?

I've been looking into the same thing recently after being traumatised by lugging a 70 metre 10mm rope up to a hut in the Alps. The strongest recommendations I've had have been for the Mammut Revelation and some 9.2 thing by Sterling that I forget the name of.
purplemonkeyelephant - on 22 Jun 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:

Another vote for the Joker. Nice and light, great handling as everyone says. The impact forces are fairly low for a single I think because of the stretch which is good for sketchy placements. Durability will be affected as the sheath is thinner, but if you need the weight saving you will have to sacrifice something
needvert on 23 Jun 2013
In reply to AlanLittle:

Possibly sterling nano.
Hi,

If you don't mind stiffer and fully dry treated (oily) ropes, I'm currently using a Millet Absolute TRX 9 (56 g/m) and it's holding up pretty well compared to all other skinny ropes I've used, particularly if compared to the Joker (52 g/m) whose sheath is very delicate. Going light and skinny you'd have to compromise on rope longevity to some extent. Also on the stiffer end Mammut's Serenity 8.7 is currently the thinnest triple rated rope on paper and at 51 g/m is definitely one of the lightest too. Didn't have a chance to try it yet, so I can't really comment on it. Interestingly I have been commending Sterling Rope ever since I bought a Velocity 9.8, but really everyone I know who tried its skinnier models (Nano included) had nothing positive to say about it. Go figure... The Tendon Master 8.9 has received more than one positive review (on UKC too) and as far as I know is the only skinny rope which is not triple rated (good? bad? don't know...) and weighing only 52 g/m won't feel heavy at all. One last comment on dry treatments. Avoid if you can (untreated ropes are rare nowadays) and if you don't do any winter/alpine or sea cliff climbing or any climbing in damp conditions. You'll save money. If you do need it though, go for fully dry (sheath and core), e.g. Tendon's Complete Shield, Beal's Golden Dry, Millet Hydrophobic, Mammut's COATINGfinish, etc.

Ciao!

Nic
Mollythedog - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to GoCragging.com: Thanks everyone - and no I didnt forget to read the weight - it does not tell you the whole rope weight, which as I said was the same as my 10mm.
Could anyone with a 60m Beal Joker possibly weigh it for me? I dont want to end up with the same again...
It's not climbing weight I'm concerned about, it's carrying weight. And I want it to work with grigri2 if poss...
Thanks,
Sue.
TRip - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:

I weighed one on the digital scales at work today for a customer. It weight 3360g for a 60m in the packaging.
woody0606 on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:
> (In reply to GoCragging.com) Thanks everyone - and no I didnt forget to read the weight - it does not tell you the whole rope weight, which as I said was the same as my 10mm.

Ummm, you could have just done the g/m x 60. Surely would have given you given you the weight of the whole rope?

Mollythedog - on 30 Jun 2013
In reply to TRip: That's great - thanks so much for that, very grateful.
Sue.
IainWhitehouse - on 30 Jun 2013
In reply to woody0606: You'd think so wouldn't you................














If you'd never weighed a rope. In reality, multiplying the g/m will give you the weight of the rope to within about 20% under or over.
needvert on 01 Jul 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:

I have a vague recollection that the weight is calculated under a small load so there will be some degree of stretch, ergo multiplying by unloaded weight will get you a total weight that's too light.

How much of a difference it makes I'm not sure.
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GrahamD - on 01 Jul 2013
In reply to Mollythedog:

Don't forget - the lighter your rope, the further you will fall due to stretch. Sometimes an important factor where there are things to bounce off !

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