/ The Epic of Everest (1924)

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dbm on 10 Oct 2013
Caught brief mention of this on Radio 4's Film Programme on the way home from work...

BFI News
The official film record of the legendary Everest expedition of 1924 is one of the most remarkable films in the BFI National Archive. Its release coincides with the 60th anniversary of the final conquest of Everest in 1953 by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/bfi-film-releases/epic-everest


David
Steve Perry - on 10 Oct 2013
In reply to dbm: Thanks for posting that, I'll be checking it out.
Solaris - on 09 Nov 2013
In reply to dbm:

Just giving this thread a bump. I saw the film on Thursday with some friends and we thought it was a real treat - visually, historically and technically. Well done BFI for restoring it. Not to be missed!
L.A. on 09 Nov 2013
In reply to Solaris:Agree absolutely I saw it this evening and thought it beautifully done. Its showing in Cornerhouse Manchester on Tuesday + Thursday this week if anyone wants to see it
allycat on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to dbm:
Amazing job by BFI and all involved in this project. I saw it on Sunday afternoon at Kendal at it truly was a treat. A very moving and poignant account of what went on during there trip and I also enjoyed how they managed to capture the individual personalities of the local culture.
Achievements by these men is what inspires generations over and over.
thedatastream on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to dbm: We saw it in Bradford last month at the Media Museum. Fantastic footage especially by the standards of the day and a moving film. Go see it!
markK6 on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to dbm:

I saw the film in Birmingham last Thursday it was fantastic, the modern score worked really well.

Well worth a look,
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Solaris - on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to markK6:
> ...the modern score worked really well.

I thought it was pretty good, but something went seriously wrong (imo) when a sound track of cow bells accompanied yaks that seemed not to have any bells on their necks. But that was the only minor blemish for me in what was an otherwise terrific, historic piece of film-making.

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