/ recommend me an mtb

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
VS4b - on 17 Oct 2016
I'm thinking about turning to the darkside and buying a mountain bike.

Any recommendations? or even anyone selling anything?

I'll be riding bridleways, forest single-track and maybe a day out or two at a trail-centre so nothing too extreme. budget ideally sub£500 or sub £1500 ish if its available on 0%
radar - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:
Now is a good time to buy, shops are (or will be soon) heavily discounting 2016 models, whilst taking delivery of the 2017 models. (Which are almost exactly the same but a different colour, with maybe a few minor changes).

Visit your local bike shop, try a few for size. Visit other local bike shops and see what they have. Fit is the biggest thing to look for, does a frame fit your body? A good lbs will point you in the right direction.

Personally I'd go for a better frame and forks with less expensive components (as you can replace those with better bits when they wear out or break, changing a frame is considerably more expensive)
Post edited at 17:42
Run_Ross_Run - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Trek superfly. Cant recommend them high enough. Had mine for 3 years now and its ace.
Good frame geometry and build quality is excellent. 29 er so rides well too. Cost 1300 and is resasonably spec'd.

Would tick all your boxes.

Can be had from between 800 and 1500 (for a good spec). Most lbcs and big shops have zero credit on them.

Shame its not 6 month later as ill be upgrading mine next year so will sell on.
ChrisJD on 17 Oct 2016
balmybaldwin - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:
I'm considering selling one of these: https://www.evanscycles.com/lapierre-x-flow-712-2012-mountain-bike-EV156536

For which I would need the top end of your budget, but I can't offer credit!

It's a magnificent bike with a phenomenal spec in very good condition, but dated by it's wheel size. It's super light (sub 24lb with a dropper post and big 2.4" tyres) but can handle a run in the alps as long as you stay away from the bike parks. really it's a cross country machine, and climbs at least as well as a hard-tail but is very good down too it can handle just about anything at trail centres in this country. I just don't ride it anymore (I have too many bikes) and have gone a bit downhill focused of late.

Whether this is the bike for you - I don't know especially as its the top end of your suggested budget but do consider something second hand as your money will go much further making your experience a lot more enjoyable. A new bike for £500 will be a chore to ride compared to £500 on something 3 years old (and probably hardly ridden). Just make sure it has been looked after and doesn't need everything overhauled.

Whatever you do make sure what you buy can run tubeless tyres they are probably the biggest improvement in recent years (other than dropper posts and arguably wheel size)
Post edited at 00:31
colinakmc - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

If your employer offers a ride-to-work scheme it might be worth a look, seemingly the budget limit has risen to,£2000. Because its a salary sacrifice scheme you pay for your bike from income before tax and national insurance giving you a bigger saving than the end of season sales.
KevinD - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to colinakmc:

> If your employer offers a ride-to-work scheme it might be worth a look, seemingly the budget limit has risen to,£2000.

From a quick google cant see anything saying this. That said some companies have always been able to offer a higher limit.
The scheme has a special consumer credit licence for amounts up to 1k. Above that the normal rules apply so companies are less likely to go for it. Some may decide to do so though particularly if they already deal with consumer credit anyway.

> Because its a salary sacrifice scheme you pay for your bike from income before tax and national insurance giving you a bigger saving than the end of season sales.

This is a lot more dubious nowadays. The law change requiring a sensible end of life price made things more expensive. Whilst there are ways round it they do extend the loan period considerably.
MonkeyPuzzle - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

I've noticed that Marin are now making fantastically well specced bikes for the money. Here's one within your budget on 0%: http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Marin-Hawk-Hill-27-5-650B-Mountain-Bike-2017-Full-Suspension-MTB_94633.htm

If you go for a hardtail rather than a full suss your choices really open up in terms of range and quality.
colinakmc - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to KevinD:

My only reason for suggesting this was that I'd had a look at my employers scheme last month and was surprised to find a £2k limit, previously it had been what I had understood was a universal £1k. Your point about the Consumer Credit licence rings a bell. Could it be that that has changed?
TobyA on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

I recently bought a mountain bike for the first time in years (and not having had even my old one for over 2 years). In the end I went no suspension and 650b+ (semi fat tyres). https://www.evanscycles.com/pinnacle-ramin-3-plus-2017-mountain-bike-EV264163 It can be a bit too bumpy for comfort on very rocky tracks but I wanted it for bikepacking more than for extreme descents.

The other one I very serious considered is from Alpkit! https://www.alpkit.com/sonder/sonder-transmitter But I notice the price has gone up so they must have been selling lots of them. They do look good though.
KevinD - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to colinakmc:

> Could it be that that has changed?

Think it has always been the case. Certainly for the last few years but its not something which is commonly known. Not hidden as such but just irrelevant to most people. So might just be your employer didnt realise they could go higher.
jethro kiernan - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

like the look of the Alpkit sonder transmitter as a do it all hardtail
Frank the Husky - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b: If that's the sort of stuff you're doing you can get lots of really decent, light bikes for under £500. There's a lot of rubbish talked about this spec and that spec, but for people like you and me, spending hundreds or thousands extra on various specialist bits of kit really doesn't make any difference.

I have a £500 road bike and I'm a fat lump, and there are a few people I go out with who have £2000+ bikes, but I leave them way behind and they always get cross. It's really nothing to do with the equipment!

Monk - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Whenever anyone asks a question about mountain bikes for newbies, people will always pop up recommending all sorts of amazing bikes. The truth is that a well fitting cheapish hardtail from a reputable brand is more than enough for most people. Sure, expensive bikes are nice to ride, but that's a luxury rather than a necessity. To me it sounds like a hardtail would be ideal for the type of riding you mention and fits your budget well. You should be able to get something reasonable for £500. I would go for 27.5 or 29 inch wheels rather than 26, purely because it is getting harder to get parts for 26" wheels and forks. As others have said parts wear out so you can upgrade when they do. Forks last longer so it's worth getting the best you can. Rockshox xc30 are basic but ok. I wouldn't go much lowerdown the scale than that though.
colinakmc - on 18 Oct 2016

In reply to KevinD
Re. Savings that can be made -
> This is a lot more dubious nowadays. The law change requiring a sensible end of life price made things more expensive. Whilst there are ways round it they do extend the loan period considerably.

The way some schemes get round this (apparentlly - I changed jobs just before taking advantage of this a couple of years ago - ) is to extend the lease for a further 3 years which is apparently the length of time it takes the Revenue to lose interest in the residual value of the bike. This is done for a nominal "administration" fee which I seem to remember was going to be about £25 on a £1000 bike, with no ongoing monthly outlay. Your employer has already lost interest by then because they've reclaimed the original outlay from you so the bike reverts to the finance company.
Post edited at 19:59
KevinD - on 18 Oct 2016
In reply to colinakmc:

> The way some schemes get round this (apparentlly - I changed jobs just before taking advantage of this a couple of years ago - ) is to extend the lease for a further 3 years which is apparently the length of time it takes the Revenue to lose interest in the residual value of the bike.

Yeah. For a 1k bike you need to go for about a five year term. Normally repaying over just 1-2 years and then just in theory in place for the rest. Although I dont believe you are allowed another one until it formally finishes.
ChrisJD on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Whenever anyone asks a question about mountain bikes for newbies, people will always pop up recommending they don't need to spend a lot.

Its bolx, spend as much as you can, better mountain bikes = more fun = you'll ride more
Dogwatch - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Frank the Husky:

> If that's the sort of stuff you're doing you can get lots of really decent, light bikes for under £500. There's a lot of rubbish talked about this spec and that spec, but for people like you and me, spending hundreds or thousands extra on various specialist bits of kit really doesn't make any difference.

Better wheels and gearset make a bike nicer to ride. Significantly faster, no, maybe not.

Dogwatch - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Monk:

> Sure, expensive bikes are nice to ride, but that's a luxury rather than a necessity.

Having an MTB at all is a luxury rather than a necessity.

Chris the Tall - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to ChrisJD:

> Whenever anyone asks a question about mountain bikes for newbies, people will always pop up recommending they don't need to spend a lot.

> Its bolx, spend as much as you can, better mountain bikes = more fun = you'll ride more

True, but there's no need for a beginner to spend the sort of money you would, because they won't be riding the sort of trails you rise (especially if they live in Cambridgeshire). They don't need a full suss, a dropper post, super light frame or top components. So the best thing to do is go into a shop, look for the lightest hardtail in your price range and if it feels right, buy it and go and have fun. Then maybe after a couple of years you'll be ready to upgrade, at which point your old (and by now probably battered) hardtail makes for a great commute/touring/winter/spare bike
ChrisJD on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:
> True, but there's no need for a beginner to spend the sort of money you would, because they won't be riding the sort of trails you rise

I wasn't advocating that, just countering the 'cheap is all you need'.

> Then maybe after a couple of years you'll be ready to upgrade

lol, if they get really into it, there is no need to wait two years!
Post edited at 19:35
krikoman - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

I know where there's a Giant Explorer full susser for £300.

I've got one but it's a little big for me so was hoping it would be a medium but it isn't.

I've found it to be a great bike and have had no troubles at all with mine.
garycrocker - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to Dogwatch:
Shocking comment.
Ridge - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to colinakmc:

> If your employer offers a ride-to-work scheme it might be worth a look, seemingly the budget limit has risen to,£2000. Because its a salary sacrifice scheme you pay for your bike from income before tax and national insurance giving you a bigger saving than the end of season sales.

As per the other reply, ride to work schemes are much less attractive than they used to be. I'd be surprised if you couldn't get a better deal on a 2016 spec bike from a bike shop than for a 2017 bike on a ride to work scheme.
muppetfilter - on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to garycrocker:

> Shocking comment.

Probably one of them leg shaving lycra pervs....

Another place to check is trail centres and shops as they are unloading their demo models .
VS4b - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to muppetfilter:

Thanks everyone, some good help in there.

So ive kind of narrowed it down to a hardtail, in the £1k region, not BTW scheme...

Local shop has a scott 650bPLUS reduced from 2k to 1k, looks great, but im unconvinced i need or woudl benefit from the massive tyres...

Im assuming they are niche and not really what i need?

So more specifically, what;s good for 1k in hardtail flavour out there at the moment? im not sure that im too fussed about whether to go 29 or 650b tbh so opinions welcome.
coolhand - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

I was in a similar situation earlier this year, although with a slightly tighter budget. It was very nearly a Vitus Nucleus 275 but due to sizing issues in the end I went for a B'Twin Rockrider 560 from Decathlon. Despite the poverty branding of Decathlon, it's a very decent upgrade from my old 26" Giant. Perfect for the noddy trails and approach/bikepacking stuff I do and left money over to spend on other shiny kit.
Chris the Tall - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

I rode a 650B+ recently and was pretty impressed by it - I could see myself getting one to replace my 29er hardtail as an all-rounder

First of all the fat tyres are good for your confidence - they grip better in corners, and are better in mud and snow (if you havent tried it - snow riding is great fun, but can be frustrating !). Also the tyres go some way to bridging the gap between a hardtail and a full-suss, and are supposed to be better for traction when climbing. The downside is the extra weight of the rims and tyres.

As I may have said earlier a 29er hardtail is a very versatile bike - good for all round MTB and road touring. The 650B+ is even more so - the clearance will mean you should be able to fit it with 29er wheels should you wish to do so (check this). But this means if you don't like the fat wheels you aren't stuck with them.

See if the shop will let you take it for a ride, but it could well be a bargain
colinakmc - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to Ridge:

> As per the other reply, ride to work schemes are much less attractive than they used to be. I'd be surprised if you couldn't get a better deal on a 2016 spec bike from a bike shop than for a 2017 bike on a ride to work scheme.

This thread impelled me to check out my current employers offering. They want to do change of ownership,at 12 months attracting a Revenue-acceptable payment of 25% and thus wiping out virtually all the savings. Ho hum.

Just as well the OP hadn't expressed any interest in C2W!
ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:
I've owned a Mid-fat 2.8-3.0 hardtail for a good while now as a second bike. They are a lot of fun, especially in wet autumn and winter conditions, but let down at the moment for me by the robustness of the tyres - I must have been though about 8 split carcasses (but then I do tend to ride it nearly as fast as my full susser). The plugs into splits have got me home a few times.

There are some tough tyres out there (tried a few), but they weigh far too much and kill the bike on any uphill tarmac/grinds.

Currently waiting on delivery of a Maxxis Rekon 2.8 to see if that has a better balance of robustness to weight. WTB have also brought out some Enduro casing versions.

I'm running tubeless - which is a must to get the weight down and allow the lower tyre pressures that make these bike so much fun.

Another issue is getting some of the tires (especially Trailblazers, which have wafer side walls) off wide rims, e.g Scalpers - this can almost be impossible as they seat so bloody tight. I've have had to cut one TB off the rim. Not what you want in the middle of winter, in the middle of nowhere .....
Post edited at 10:31
LastBoyScout on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> True, but there's no need for a beginner to spend the sort of money you would, because they won't be riding the sort of trails you ride (especially if they live in Cambridgeshire). They don't need a full suss, a dropper post, super light frame or top components.

That sort of comment annoys me and you should know better

So what if he lives in Cambridgeshire? Bet he doesn't do much climbing there, either, but you wouldn't tell him he doesn't need a set of cams as a result.

For someone on a climbing forum, it's a pretty safe bet he spends a reasonable amount of time somewhere with mountains...
Chris the Tall - on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to LastBoyScout:

Oh come on, cycling is different to climbing in that respect. It would be ignorant of me to suggest there is no mountain biking in the Cambridgeshire area just because there are no hills, but i didn't say that. The vast majority of my riding starts and finishes in Sheffield, or wherever I'm on holiday, and I rarely do trail centres, but that's probably not typical. In fact I'd imagine the OP will spent far more time travelling to ride than me, but I'd also expect them to spend some time exploring their local trails, which won't be the steep rocky stuff that I know ChrisJD rides.

As his last post shows, Chris knows far more about MTBing than me, but I was just making the point that beginners do not need high-spec bikes. (Whether they need cams is another issue - I say learn to lead on nuts !)
ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

> Local shop has a scott 650bPLUS reduced from 2k to 1k, looks great

Scot Scale Plus? Which 2016 model is it?
VS4b - on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to ChrisJD:

Scott scale 710 plus.

I have plenty of cams
VS4b - on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to ChrisJD:

Or Scott genius 710 plus for 2k down from 4k which is probably overkill ;-)
ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Looking at eh 2016 spec, that a good set of components at £1900 for £1000.

The Rocket Rons certainly aren't as wafer thin as the WTB Traiblazers. But I did split a RR first time out in the Peak.

But I'm sure for most trail riding & trail centres, the bike will be a fun thing! As long as you don't want to do lots of tarmac.

And the claimed weight of around 26lb isn't bad at all.

But 650-Plus is certainly a bit of a leap of faith, compared going for a standard 27.5/ 29er hardtail. The big discount might suggest they are not selling well !


Is that set up with tubes or will the bike shop set it up for Tubeless

For info about tubeless, read this long thread: http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?n=650351
ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Interestingly, they've also slackened the head angle from 67.6 on the 2016 to 66.5 on the 2017 bikes.

That's getting pretty old school at 67.6.
Chris the Tall - on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to ChrisJD:


> But 650-Plus is certainly a bit of a leap of faith, compared going for a standard 27.5/ 29er hardtail. The big discount might suggest they are not selling well !

Doesn't surprise me - I wouldn't have considered one until I tried one at a demo day, but now I'm quite tempted. How do you find it for climbing ?

Interesting stuff about tyres - do you ever get these problems on your other bikes ?



ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:
> Interesting stuff about tyres - do you ever get these problems on your other bikes ?

No, because I run heavy duty casings on 2.4".

The weight and drag penalty (on tyres available so far) running the same type of casings on 2.8/3.0 just kill the bike - ie make it a pig for all round riding, removing the fun. But this is recognised by the tyre manufacturers (its early days on Plus bike really), so some of the newer Plus offerings provide some hope (fingers crossed - we'll see with the Rekon).
Post edited at 13:28
VS4b - on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to ChrisJD:

The shop did say the frame would take a normaln29er wheel with and tyres but I think it's probably too much hassle or maybe too risky as a first mtb really. Shame as it looks lovely...
ChrisJD on 27 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Mid-fat hardtails do look the part ;-)
benoneill13 on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to VS4b:

A couple of months ago I picked up a 2016 Specialized Stumpjumper comp fsr (650b) for about £1600. Put £1000 on ride2work scheme and the other £600 on a 0% credit card over 2 years. I use it for singletrack and trail riding and it is absolutely beautiful! Spent 2 days riding in Coed Y Brenin (great place, check it out) last week and it took everything I threw at it in its stride. I'd fully recommend it... if you can still find one.
ChrisJD on 29 Oct 2016
tonanf - on 08 Nov 2016
In reply to VS4b:

Whyte.

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.