/ NEW ARTICLE: My Eiger North Face Story by David Gladwin

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Michael Ryan - on 13 May 2008
"Sometimes in life it's good to set a goal, something that takes planning, is measurable and achievable. For me I cope with the humdrum of everyday life by creating a personal challenge, usually associated with mountaineering.

When I saw the local forecast, predicting a clear spell which would give the snow and ice enough time to stabilize followed by a window in the weather large enough for a multi day trip, then I knew it was time to tackle the notorious North face of the Eiger."

David Gladwin tells us his Eiger North Face Story

Read more: http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=958
Alex Roddie - on 13 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
Brilliant, I enjoyed reading that. Really good pictures too.
The New NickB - on 13 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

Great article. One minor point of pedantry, just check the date for Death Bivi, I am sure it was before the 1938 ascent, so not 1939.
Alex Roddie - on 13 May 2008
In reply to The New NickB:
Good point, Mehringer and Sedlmeyer died at Death Bivouac in 1935.
SteveD - on 13 May 2008
In reply to All: I'm currently (re)reading white spider so this article is timely for me. Not something that I would ever attempt but hats off to the guys that do!

Steve D
biped - on 13 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

Good stuff.

1 in 13 previous attempts ending in a death: is that true? I have my doubts. Prior to the first ascent perhaps, but now?

Stuart
Alex Roddie - on 13 May 2008
In reply to biped:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
>
> Good stuff.
>
> 1 in 13 previous attempts ending in a death: is that true? I have my doubts. Prior to the first ascent perhaps, but now?
>
> Stuart

Prior to the first ascent, the death rate was more like 50%--getting off the face alive before 1938 was a notable event!

1/13 death rate sounds about right to me.
Jimmy56 - on 13 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com: I'm feeling pedantic so . . .

> My math's isn't great but doing some quick sums, a 1 in 13 chance of survival was giving me reason to be concerned.

Should that be a 1 in 13 chance of death? - I wonder if people would still attempt it if there was only a 1 in 13 chance of coming back?
The New NickB - on 13 May 2008
In reply to biped:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
>
> Good stuff.
>
> 1 in 13 previous attempts ending in a death: is that true? I have my doubts. Prior to the first ascent perhaps, but now?
>
> Stuart

I suspect that deaths on the actual face are quite rare these days, but quite a few deaths seem to occur on the descent.

In The Beckoning Silence, Joe Simpson mentions there being no deaths on the face for ten years, until the two British guys that they witnessed falling from the 2nd Icefield, this was September 2000.

RichT - on 14 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
Nice article. When was the ascent?
Aiden Wright on 14 May 2008 - host81-149-71-2.in-addr.btopenworld.com
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com: isn't the north face just a death trap these days? in winter i guess its probably ok, though?
Aly - on 14 May 2008
In reply to biped: Got to admit I've got reservations about that figure too, certainly of it being accurate to date. I wonder if the author could say where he got it from?
John Harlin - on 17 May 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
Enjoyed the article, but would very much like to learn the source of the mortality statistics. I've tried to do the research myself, but have been told that no one is keeping track of the number of attempts or even the number of deaths. Could David please let me know where the 70 deaths figure came from? Also the 1 death per 13 attempts, which seems exceedingly high--but also tricky to measure: is the attempt an individual or a team? I.e., Would 13 attempts be 13 climbers or 13 teams of two = 26 climbers? And if you in fact have a good source of statistics, do you know what percentage of the deaths occurs on the descent? When I climbed it three years ago we went to the top of the Jungfraujoch (about 5 hours versus 3) and took the train down from there. Longer, but safer. And truly beautiful, too; a worthy outing in its own right. Finally, if you (or anyone else) know where to get these statistics, I'd really appreciate learning the source so I can ask directly. Thanks!
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kendo on 27 May 2008
In reply to John Harlin: Are you John Harlin's son?

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