/ Group debate questions...

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Duncan Campbell - on 01 May 2012
I have one of my last uni lectures tomorrow, a group debate on the impact of windfarms on bird populations. My group is arguing that windfarms DO have a negative effect.

My job is to come up with some questions for the other group to pick apart their argument (we don't know anything about each others' presentations).

Do any of the UKC wise elders have any tips on how to go about this? I really want to just get this done so I can relax before revision for my finals starts...

Cheers, Dunc
timjones - on 01 May 2012
In reply to Duncan Campbell:
> I have one of my last uni lectures tomorrow, a group debate on the impact of windfarms on bird populations. My group is arguing that windfarms DO have a negative effect.
>
> My job is to come up with some questions for the other group to pick apart their argument (we don't know anything about each others' presentations).
>
> Do any of the UKC wise elders have any tips on how to go about this? I really want to just get this done so I can relax before revision for my finals starts...
>

It's relatively simple you will need a good knowledge of the subject with some hard facts to back up your stance. You will then need to think on your feet during the debate in order to work your facts into questions that fit around their presentation. If you prepare well it should be good fun, enjoy it.

Scarab9 - on 01 May 2012
In reply to Duncan Campbell:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=wind+farm+impact+on+bird+populations

just read up on the subject and you'll soon come across arguements for and against.
TMM - on 01 May 2012
In reply to Duncan Campbell:

There are no shortcuts to this so you and your group will need to invest some time and energy before the debate.

Consider conduting a mock debate using your half of the group to see how the discussion might ebb and flow.

How will the opposing group construct their argument?
What is the legitimacy of their likely source material (and yours)?
If you were defending wind farms what questions would you and your team struggle to answer?
Etc..
Duncan Campbell - on 01 May 2012
In reply to Duncan Campbell: Cool, thanks guys.

Just feeling tired of my degree now after the long dissertation slog, the 2nd 10,000 word assignment I have had this year.

Mega keen for guilt-free climbing this summer.

Dunc
dissonance - on 01 May 2012
In reply to timjones:

> It's relatively simple you will need a good knowledge of the subject with some hard facts to back up your stance.

or depending on the debate structure you can just make some convincing "facts" up. Makes it a right bugger for them to counter but somewhat unsporting (there is a reason why some conspiracy theorists etc like debates as it is difficult to fact check on the fly).
Scarab9 - on 01 May 2012
In reply to Duncan Campbell:

having watched some footage from parlimentary debates, I've realised the best way to conduct yourself is to call the opposition names, completely ignore the question, and have a load of people making a derisive rumble behind you.
timjones - on 01 May 2012
In reply to dissonance:
> (In reply to timjones)
>
> [...]
>
> or depending on the debate structure you can just make some convincing "facts" up. Makes it a right bugger for them to counter but somewhat unsporting (there is a reason why some conspiracy theorists etc like debates as it is difficult to fact check on the fly).

I guess it's an option but where's the fun in "cheating"?

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