/ Help me decide B&W process/print/scan

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Tall Clare - on 02 Oct 2012
I've got a couple of B&W films where I need to get them processed, scanned, and get a set of prints at the same time.

N.b. If it was just processing I'd do it myself, likewise if I didn't want all the prints. It's going to be cheaper to do it all at the same time on this particular occasion (just thought I'd throw all that in as a disclaimer).

So.

Who should I use? Ilford? Peak Imaging? Digitalab (current favourite)? Someone else I haven't considered?

Your thoughts within the next hour would be very gratefully received.
Tall Clare - on 02 Oct 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

And! Scanning question ahoy!

If one place says low-res scans from 35mm are 1800 x 1200, and hi-res are 4500 x 3000, but another place says low-res are 4.5mb and med/hi-res are 18mb, are the second place's hi-res likely to be higher-res than those from the first place?

Ta!
Blue Straggler - on 02 Oct 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

I'm always puzzled about resolution measured in Mb, I only understand pixel dimensions! The thing about the Mb thing is that it doesn't refer to the file size of the saved image (the .jpeg), but to the image size "when opened up". If you look around on the screen in your image editor of choice, it may something like 18Mb for an image which was 3Mb in file size. I don't know what it all means!

So I hope someone will explain :-)
Tall Clare - on 02 Oct 2012
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Damn - I was hoping you might know! But I think you've provided my answer anyway - thanks for that :-)
Pete Jones - on 02 Oct 2012
In reply to Blue Straggler:

If you have an image file (e.g. photo) its probably a JPEG. This is a compressed format. When you open the file it is converted to a bitmap. Each pixel has a red , green and blue value (RGB) to determine the color. The values of the RGB components are 0 to 255 i.e. 1 byte = 8bits. So each pixel is 24 bits (3 bytes). This is often referred to 24bit colour. The size of the image in memory = width (in pixels) x height (in pixels) x 3 bytes.

This is why you are getting 18Mb for a 3Mb file size.
Blue Straggler - on 03 Oct 2012
In reply to Pete Jones:

Thanks Pete - of course, its the RGBness of it. Is there an absolute linearity to it all though i.e. can one work out the width * height by going backwards from the open file size? Can Clare tell whether a 24Mb (when opened) image will be bigger or smaller than 5400 * 3600?
Pete Jones - on 03 Oct 2012
No sure I understand what you are asking. When the image is opened, the size in memory is fixed. You can usually zoom in or out which determines the width & height you see on screen. This does not change the size in memory.
Blue Straggler - on 03 Oct 2012
In reply to Pete Jones:
I will try to clarify, but later as I am a tad busy now! Ta
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DaveHall246 on 03 Oct 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:
Just found this website which seems to explain things pretty well.
http://www.digitalmemoriesonline.net/scan/scan_processing/resolving_scanning_resolution.htm

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