/ Southern Sandstone in winter

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Slimneck - on 24 Oct 2012
I was leafing through Niall Grimes 'Boulder Britain' the other day and he had the Southern Sandstone down as, all year round climbing.

What's the best crag for winter climbing down there? How is Harrisons this time of year?
Elrond - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck:

Probably Stone Farm or Bowles as the best in winter as they both get a lot of sun.
Trangia - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck:

Unless there is a long dry period (rare) the rocks generally get very wet and lichen covered and are not suitable for climbing in winter months. As you know sandstone should not be climbed on when wet as it damages the rock.
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck:
last winter and spring was very dry and the rock was in condition for most the winter and spring accross most the crags.
tom84 - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck: calling it rock is a bit of a stretch- the contents of my chalkbag is more solid
i.munro - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to CurlyStevo:


> last winter and spring was very dry and the rock was in condition for most the winter and spring accross most the crags.

Since when we've had the wettest year on record.

Slimneck - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to Slimneck)
> As you know sandstone should not be climbed on when wet as it damages the rock.

Indeed. Suprised me to see it in the book as all year round. Might call the hut at Bowles if we have a little dry patch and see if they think it is climable before heading down. Wouldn't dream of getting on it if it's wet :)
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to i.munro:
thats the nice thing about life - you never know whats gonna happen next :)
i.munro - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to CurlyStevo:

Well when the rock dried briefly in late summer & I got back on some old favourites I certainly didn't expect to find them smashed up that badly by peeps climbing them when damp.

Not sure that counts s a nice thing though :-(
PeterJuggler - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck: I think that Niall in the book mentions that he only visited Stone Farm.
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to i.munro:
which ones?
rotax123 on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck: You can climb parts of Harrison's all year round (Though it's pretty mushy there at the moment), We had a quite a few sessions at Harrisons, Bowles and Stone farm this past year and some were in January! Bouldering wise your best bet is probably Stone Farm if we get some dry spells! Or retreat back to the plastic.
i.munro - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to CurlyStevo:

I'd rather not say on a public forum in case it directs more traffic to them.
Feel free to PM me if you want details.
However on most of the problems I tried I found the 'skin' on the starting footholds had been broken & on one problem I only found one hold (out of say 20+) that hadn't been !
Ok I sort of 'get' that there's a temptation to climb if the surface is dry-ish despite all the publicity
bit FFS once you've snapped half the holds on a boulder problem surely normal people would have the brains to stop.
strudles - on 24 Oct 2012
some areas of eridge green are very fragile, was surprised to see problems deteriorate so quickly over summer with the rain.

theres a few spots on ss where you can boulder all year round because it's so overhanging and good quality rock.. however you are better off going to an indoor wall, you will get a lot more done.

I did climb last year in november during a dry bright spell but even then the rock was damp in places and you had to pick your routes.

the trouble is because the temperatures drop and the days get shorter even if it's been dry for a many days the rock holds it's moisture.

stephen
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to strudles:
the weather in autumn last year was quite unsettled hence the damp rock you found in november, it got dry a bit later than this in fact it was a 6 month drought IIRC, the rock dried out nicely.
i.munro - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to strudles:

> I did climb last year in november during a dry bright spell but even then the rock was damp in places and you had to pick your routes.
>


In well over 30 years of climbing there I can remember only one short period in (I think 1990) when that wasn't true. Although Bowles SF & harrison's dry out completely most summers.
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to i.munro:it was exremely dry at the end of last spring in fact drier than some end of summers. I didnt get out till march/april and it was in good nick then, plenty of dry rock, but i spoke to (very well ;) seasoned regulars that said it had been dry prior to this most the winter.
Slimneck - on 26 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck: Sod it, I'll wait till summer.
CurlyStevo - on 26 Oct 2012
In reply to Slimneck:
unfortunately this summer the rock was generally in worse condition than mid winter until late spring and certainly never got as dry in the summer as it was in mid -> late spring. Really you're best trying to learn when the rock will be dry rather than using some blanket rules.

Theres a few sandstone outcrops that the guides recommend visiting when leaves won't be on the trees as it's the best chance you have of finding them in condition.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Slimneck - on 26 Oct 2012
In reply to CurlyStevo: Sod it. I'll go to the Peak District.

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