/ 'Job done' on wind farms"

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Jim C - on 14 Nov 2012
Should we just stop digging ourselves further this particular hole now that we have hit the target?


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9676256/Job-done-on-wind-farms-says-John-Hayes.html
mikekeswick - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Jim C: I think they are pretty much a waste of time anyway. Half the ones near here don't work anyway. Why not make use of tidal power - at least that is reliable and doesn't need much more than a sunken turbine.
Lord of Starkness - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to mikekeswick:

Before anyone thinks that no more new onshore turbines will be built, all the article says is that no more than the 10,000 already planned will go up.

At the moment I doubt very much whether more than 5000 onshore turbines have been. The company I work for has been involved with a lot of the larger onshore projects built to date - (formwork for the concrete bases) and to date have only supplied equipment for getting on for 1200 or so. Whilst a few developments in Scotland have had more than 50 turbines each, the next group have had between 10 and 30 turbines, but the majority of developments only have between 1 and 6 turbines in an array. We're still a heck of a long way off reaching the 10000 planned.

Offshore is then next 'big' area, but they're still sorting out the technology and economics of the mega base structures needed to site the turbines in deep water.

Wave and tidal have similar technology issues when it comes to scaling up the models first into working prototypes, and then placing them in the hostile locations where they can generate most power.

The most obvious and urgently needed developments are in the Nuclear field, however the ones that are planned are taking an eternity to go through our Byzantine planning system, not to mention the politics of how much subsidy the generators will get for building the things.

This sort of chaos was always going to be the result of privatising the Energy supply sector, and creating 'a market' where traders invariably are only interested in short term gains and pay little heed to the long term strategic needs of the country.

As a nation we've known for decades when our current generating plant would need replacing, yet successive governments have lacked the political bottle to do anything about it.
RickGrundy - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Jim C:


Well if a Tory minister say 'Job Done' then it must be true. Any evidence to support that we have hit out targets? Or even will have with the projects proposed?

Here's a link with some actual data to it. 3.8% of energy from renewable sources in 2011, up from 3.2% in 2010. I'd say a 15% taget by 2020 is still a way off.
https://restats.decc.gov.uk/cms/national-renewables-statistics/

Skip - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to mikekeswick:
> (In reply to Jim C) I think they are pretty much a waste of time anyway. Half the ones near here don't work anyway. Why not make use of tidal power - at least that is reliable and doesn't need much more than a sunken turbine.

Near where? Are you talking about large, commercial turbines, or small domestic ones. I have never seen or heard of a large commercial turbine that "doesn't work" (what do you mean exactly), they are put in locations where they do work.

Marine power is theoretically the best solution as water is a lot denser than air and it would annoy many fewer people. However there are good reasons why we are struggling to develop marine renewables, the conditions are extremely harsh.
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Ridge - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Skip:
I can think of two wind farms locally than never have more than 50% of the turbines operating, regardless of wind conditions or time of day. Wether that's due to maintenance, lack of parts, insufficient transmission capacity or it's a bigger subsidy for non-generation I don't know.

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