/ Glueing Masonry

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pec on 21 Nov 2012
A chunk of stone has been knocked off my doorstep and needs to be glued back on. The step is sandstone and the chunk is from the underside of the bullnose projection on the front edge of the step. Its about 6"x2"x1" in size. Can anybody recommend some sort of masonry adhesive or resin, preferably which can be bought in small quantities and which doesn't need some sort of specialist applicator to use, though a standard sealant gun would be fine.
Thanks.
the power - on 21 Nov 2012
In reply to pec: p.v.a. works very well on pourous stone but you will have to work out how to hold the piece in place while it goes off/drys
neil9216 - on 22 Nov 2012
Hi I,m a joiner.
obviosly you could spend a fortune and get a stone mason out however if all your after is a quick fix just head to any builder merchants ie keyline travis perkins,jewson, B and q at last resort.
then buy grab adhesive, comes in many different names like sticks like shit or no nails,
and use it in a silicone gun and itll be fine I have done this many times, I have even stuck my stone steps back down using this method and had no trouble in 2 years.
hope this helps
neil
pec on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to neil9216: Thanks, I've already got some no more nails type stuff so I could try that first and see how long it lasts. I thought with it being masonry it would need something a bit more specific.
jkarran - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

Dust off the loose surface with a brush then waterproof woodglue or 5min epoxy back in place. Support it while the glue dries/cures. Pretty much any mildly gap filling waterproof glue will do the trick wile you still have two closely matched mating surfaces. Once it's covered in thick builders grab adhesive the gap won't close up properly, you'll be left with a seam.

jk
nniff - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

You could also try epoxy putty, which is strong enough in its own right to repair chipped stone steps (and to build up the pommels of DIY leashless ice axes http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=202035 )
Murko Fuzz - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

To be honest with you Araldite is pretty convincing for this. Was using something very similar in France on a restoration job in earlier this year to good effect.
RichMoss - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec: I would suggest epoxy resin - maybe araldite will do. If you can get a good contact surface, that will be fine. Keep it dry and don't load it until its well cured. It shouldn't be the case here but beware that epoxy isn't uv resistant, so if exposed it needs to have a uv protective coat applied (paint/varnish). I wouldn't use things like no nails as they tend to occupy too much volume and prevent a good close contact surface (I have a distrust of 'no nails' type products, in my experience I they don't last long and I have to then re-glue properly once they've failed).
Phase - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec: chipping the steps to make them an easier climb! tut tut tut.


sorry **coat grabbed**
Nigel Thomson - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec: As yer joiner already mentions, however, my preference would be pink grip or gripfill. Both come in a silicon type tube.
Phase - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to RichMoss: (I have a distrust of 'no nails' type products, in my experience I they don't last long and I have to then re-glue properly once they've failed).

have to agree here. no nails products have their place but IMHO aren't great for stone/masonry.
andyb211 - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to jkarran:
> (In reply to pec)
>
> two closely matched mating surfaces.


Sounds fun!!

johnwright - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Phase:
> (In reply to RichMoss) (I have a distrust of 'no nails' type products, in my experience I they don't last long and I have to then re-glue properly once they've failed).
>
> have to agree here. no nails products have their place but IMHO aren't great for stone/masonry.

In France they have " Ni Clou" it's a french version of No Mails,it's like all french glue, it's crap, my better half uses it to stick plastic angle bead to melamine board, it seemed to work but it didn't need much to dislodge it.lol
wilkie14c - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to the weegy:
Yea gripfill <or is it gripfix?> I used this to repair a reconstructed stone bay window that blew its rusty rebars. Still good today and it was 15 years ago! Comes in a green and white mastic tube. Builders merchants, bout a fiver IIRC
MaxWilliam on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

Just to note PVA will not work, it will fail when it gets damp. PVA is commonly suggested to so many things to which it is not suitable!

I'd suggest epoxy with a couple of stainless steel dowels, i.e. drill a 4mm/5mm hole in each piece and glue together with a stainless steel bar in the holes.
handjammer - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to pec: I would maybe try Gorilla glue. It foams up to fill any gaps, you just have to dampen one face and hold it for a few minutes. I'm sure it is supposed to work on any porous surface - it comes in small bottles, 100ml or more, and so should fit your criteria ease of application wise.
Rigid Raider - on 26 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

Araldite and a couple of SS bolts sounds like the most permanent option to me.
Lukeva - on 26 Nov 2012
In reply to pec:

Its about 6"x2"x1" in size.

I take it that's not re the chunk size? Evo-stik (Bostik) 'Seriously Strong Stuff' will hold. Very, very strong grad adhesive


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