/ RIP Patrick Moore

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Tom Last - on 09 Dec 2012

RIP Patrick Moore.

A great life.
lfenbo - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: yes sad news indeed. rip.
Richard Smith - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: The Sky at Night will not be the same without Patrick.

Patrick was very important for the Apollo Missions as he was considered as one of the worlds experts on the Moon before the man missions; he mapped it for NASA.

R.I.P. Sir Patrick.
TheDrunkenBakers - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: RIP indeed.
Skyfall - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

He was a real character and much more influential than most people would imagine.

As a kid I wrote to him and got a response and an invite to go to his house to use his telescopes, which was lovely. Rather disappointing when we called to arrange and his secretary said he was always doing this but he was off to the US for ages. But the thought was there!

A real legend for doing Sky at Night for so long but I caught one recently and he was looking so old and frail I thought it was a bit sad actually. Anyway, inspired me when I was younger and refused to dumb things down too much.

Some interesting personal views on politics and the like I seem to recall...
wilkie14c - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:
No more Mr Night Sky
subalpine - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: oh no, a great inspiration.
my dad took me to see him in scotland yard back in '81- i got to shake his hand and he signed my guinness book of astronomy facts and feats, now open in front of me;(
subalpine - on 09 Dec 2012
sbc_10 - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

Yes, a sad day. He was a genuine enthusiast for his hobby and has inspired countless young people, including myself to study the stars. Like the posts above, he answered my letters as well on a rickety old typewriter.
I think he met Orville Wright, Gagarin, Yeager and Armstrong. What a span of history.









Doug on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to sbc_10: Still remember begging my parents to let me stay up late to see 'Sky at Night', age 10 I wanted to be an astronomer, later realised that today its mostly maths rather than hours watching the sky :-(
Tony Sparks - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

Very sad news
Mooncat - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

I was lucky enough to meet him twice when he stayed at a hotel I used to run. He was exactly how you'd imagine from his tv personality, a genuinely nice person, eccentric and always slightly dishevelled. I never heard anybody say a bad word about him.

philhilo - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: As climbers we have a lot in common with Sir Patrick - we pursue what we enjoy and damn whether anybody thinks it is fashionable, we do what we do and people take us as they find us - they called him eccentric, we know it as passion. A true gent, a great inspiration, and a brilliant man. A sad farewell.
toasted - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

A great man indeed. Don't get many like him. RIP.
nonymouse - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: One less star tonight. :(
subalpine - on 09 Dec 2012
sbc_10 - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to philhilo:
> As climbers we have a lot in common with Sir Patrick -

That's right and well said. The process of studying nature in a direct and experiential manner, either through the eyepiece of a telescope or an early morning start in the Alps, is the common thread. What follows is a lifetime of curiosity and wonder at what is over that next horizon.
andi turner - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: Absolutely gutted. He was a real character and inspirational guy. I'll miss him for sure.
The Pylon King on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:


NOOOOOOOOO! he is my Hero :(
Mick Ward - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to philhilo:

> As climbers we have a lot in common with Sir Patrick - we pursue what we enjoy and damn whether anybody thinks it is fashionable, we do what we do and people take us as they find us - they called him eccentric, we know it as passion. A true gent, a great inspiration, and a brilliant man. A sad farewell.

But what a wonderful post.

Mick < breaking radio silence on here >

Yrmenlaf on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

And he played a mean Xylophone (although he tended to rush a bit when he got overexcited)

Y.
Richard Smith - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

It's a clear night here in Northamptonshire, the night sky is so clear. If the night sky is clear were you are, we who liked, loved or admired Sir Patrick should go out, look up at the stars and raise a class to him.

He now is with the stars.

Again R.I.P. Sir Patrick.
bouldery bits - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

Sad news indeed.
A real expert and someone I really liked to see on the telly - No Dumbing down on the Sky at Night!
icnoble on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: When I was at grammar school we had a teacher who was mad keen on astronomy. We raised the funds to build an observatory. When it was up an running Patrick Moore was invited to celebrate its completion. He came and I was asked to give a short talk on an astronomical subject. I was saddened to hear of his death.
thin bob on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/dec/09/sir-patrick-moore

Xylophonist, bomb disposal, moon-mapper to NASA, cricketer, inspiration....could a dozen people do the same 'nowadays'? . I say it's one *more* star in the sky...i just hope someone takes his ashes onto the space station.
Yrmenlaf on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to icnoble:

When we opened the "Bede the Scientist" gallery at Bede's World, Jarrow, we invited him to come. He was too unwell, but he did a video for us.

Y/
graeme jackson - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:
I'll shed a tear for one of the few 'celebrities' I truly respected.
owlart - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: A sad loss. When I was at Uni he came and gave a guest lecture in our Physics dept., and I was lucky enough to be invited to join him for lunch with the staff afterwards. A truely remarkable man who was even larger in life than he was on the TV.
ring ouzel on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to sbc_10: He met Wright and Armstrong!! Thats amazing. Thats just fantastic. What amazing life he lived. He's up there with Feynman in my book. RIP Patrick.
Wonko The Sane - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: It had to come soon, but still a bit of a shock. I had to re read to make sure it was Patrick.

Very sad that he's gone. Grew up watching him on Sky at Night. What a fantastic contribution he made to Astronomy though! A life well lived by the look of it.
ads.ukclimbing.com
The Pylon King on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

About 14 years ago i was in a very dark place (my father had just died, split up from my partner, about to become homeless, dropped by record company etc etc) and had foolishly smoked some very strong weed.
This black shroud started to engulf me and i was on the verge of trying to end it all ( certainly about to call the Samaritans) and i turned on the telly and 'The Sky at Night' came on. Suddenly i felt ok again. weird.
I owe him my life!!
dale1968 - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: sky at night won't be the same,RIP
subalpine - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: fascinating glimpse of the future from 1963 with Arthur Clarke: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00m72mf
Tony Naylor on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:
He also wrote "Bureaucrats and How to Annoy Them" under the pseudonym R T Fishall. A wonderful read, clever and hilarious.
subalpine - on 10 Dec 2012
Ava Adore - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man:

This morning on Radio 2, Chris Evans played an "interview" he did years ago with Zyg and Zag. Really silly questions that he responded to with such great humour.
subalpine - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Ava Adore: so sad:(

The war had a significant influence on his life: his only romance ended when his fiancée, a nurse called Lorna, was killed in 1943 by a bomb which struck her ambulance in London. Moore subsequently remarked that he never married because "there was no one else for me ... second best is no good for me ... I would have liked a wife and family, but it was not to be.
Tom V - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Tony Naylor:

I can't find a copy but suspect its gist is "How to engage civil servants in increasingly futile tasks so that people who really need attention have to wait even longer".

Wasn't one of his gems the suggestion that you always return a paper clip affixed to your reply forms because it might cause some sort of interference?
graeme jackson - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: marginally off topic but this morning we saw a beautiful thin crescent moon with venus slightly above and to the right around 8am due south. Sir patrick would be in his element telling us about that.
sbc_10 - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to graeme jackson:

.....yes and I think Mercury is slightly lower and to the left, difficult to spot in the dawn light.
http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/visible-planets-tonight-mars-jupiter-venus-saturn-mercury

Rob Davies - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Southern Man: Apart from his programmes on astronomy, I remember a programme Patrick Moore did many, many years ago on "independent thinkers", including "Can You Speak Venusian?".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjpcZPT1-NA

In this case "independent" appears to mean much the same thing as "bat-shit crazy", but Patrick remains incredibly polite to the guy. Watching this, it is important to remember that even the daftest of ideas will have some believers!

The clip also demonstrates that glossolalia is not confined to those that claim divine inspiration.

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