/ Snow and dog fur?

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Frank4short - on 18 Jan 2013
Have just been out with the mutt in the snow. It's really his first time in proper snow and it would appear that whilst he loves it the snow really likes to stick to his fur.

Was thinking this must be a common enough thing. So wondering does anyone out there have a solution to other than just leave him accumulate the snow. For the record he's a Schnauser Poodle cross so Poodle type fur and he looks like a little black Labradoodle.
In reply to Frank4short: Probably a good reason not to make a coat out of him, but could be a useful doormat...
What Goes Up - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: Our schnauzers really get it caught up in their leg hair and under their bellies - really clogs up like tough little snowballs. No way of avoiding it that I know of, but rather than trying to pick them out afterwards (they compress further) just lob them in the shower for a moment.

Take photos first. They look funny.
stumpy - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: They make suits to put onto dogs to stop snow accumulating on their fur. My girlfried has a minature poodle and she puts one of these on him wien it snows, it is balck and a lycra type of material..... looks kind of like a gimp suit.
Sir Chasm - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: gt85.
Milesy - on 18 Jan 2013
My labradoodle has boots I got on ebay. doesnt stop the snow balling up on her fur but stops it balling between her toes and icing up which causes her intense pain.
stumpy - on 18 Jan 2013
ollieollie - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: i just leave them, my springer looked like a snow ball this morning but he loved it
Tall Clare - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Milesy:

Good call - my parents had a couple of gordon setters who had problems with balling on their feet, which can lead to problems.
Sarah G on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short:
I've got a spaniel who actively rummages about in the undergrowth, and we have alread lost one coat.

The most effective thing to do is get a tub of really cheap nasty marg, and very lightly (ie, rub grease into your hands then rub them over the pooch) grease the dogs' paws (especially between the pads) and their under carriage- tummy, feathers, armpits JUST before you go out; any earlier and the dog will simply sit and proceed to lick it all off!

when you get in from your walk, the dog will happily sit and clean itself up, if there's any grease left.

the problem with allowing the snow to accumulte is that it tends to mat up, twist, and then get ripped out by the weight of the snow and the dangly movement of the balls- painful. when the snow really compacts, it's hard to get it off, and a couple of years ago I had to literally cut the stuff off, losing some of the dog's feathers as I went. After that I deliberately trimmed back some of her fur and then took to greasing her up.

Sx

PS same trick works with preventing snow from balling up under the hooves of horses- whack a load of grease into the hoof.
colina - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short:
there are crampons available for most dog breeds now so check them out too.
In reply to colina: But make sure you fit them the right way up.
Moggsy on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Sarah G: butter your dog? Honestly? It's a dog mate leave it to crack on with it
Tall Clare - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Moggsy:

Dogs can get frostbite between their pads. Suggestions like Sarah's are just about looking after your hound.
IainRUK - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Tall Clare: Yeah..fly gets coated but no other issues..

But a friends spaniel gets badly snowed up on her legs and forms snow balls which make her have an awkward gait.. so we have to keep an eye on her...
efrance24234 - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Sarah G: your dog has feathers? does it have wings too?
yorkshireman - on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short:

We've had several days of heavy snow and I run every day with my border collie - this morning he was practically swimming in the stuff.

It was -11c so I think it was too powdery to ball up - it gets a bit more claggy when its warmer, but I never have a problem and he's probably run in the snow maybe 40 days so far this winter.

He gets a good towelling off when he comes in but I can't really say there's ever been a specific problem.
Moggsy on 18 Jan 2013
In reply to Tall Clare: classic, il be sure to take my Lurpack when I take the beasts to the peak tomorrow
Sarah G on 19 Jan 2013
In reply to efrance24234:
> (In reply to Sarah G) your dog has feathers? does it have wings too?
No, no wings, but it defo has bloody cotton wool between its ears. She's thick as a brick.

Sxx

shirleynot on 19 Jan 2013
In reply to Sarah G:
> (In reply to Frank4short)
>>
I deliberately trimmed back some of her fur and then took to greasing her up.
>
My boyfriend agrees this is the best option.....
happy_c - on 19 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: Excessive fur in between the pads doesnt help, but not many dogs get this, I have been told of shooty folk to put vasaline or baby oil on his pads .............

Anyhow, i stick to doing nothing, Ill be suprised if anyting can stick to his pads, hes never still and always face first in a bush somewhere so im sure it will keep clear :D

Why out of interest do you not want snow on the dog? I know that sounds daft, but he wont get as cold as we do if we where covered in snow, Mylo has had his full underside frozen and stuck with snow balls and still panting like mad!
Sarah G on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to happy_c:
The snow balls up, and the balls get bigger and bigger and harder- until they get to be impossible to remove! Cookie got so balled up a couple of winters ago that her gait actually changed- she had to swing her legs out. Then the balls got so heavy that they ripped the fur out of the skin. Nasty. None of this stopped her from gamoolling about in the snow per se, but it was horrible to see the damage the snow did.

Sx
Ben Sharp - on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: Have you tried TX Direct?
climber34neil - on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: I have a shnauzer that lines to roll in the snow, we tend to keep the fur between his pads cut short which helps keep the snow off his feet then leave him to sort out the rest, I did try to get it off him but that just seemed to make it worse !
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mark s - on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to Frank4short: on friday me and andi t walked to the skyline with our dogs,it was utterly freezing and the snow was going sideways along with the drifting snow.
it was the first time i remember icicles forming on the dogs whiskers and face.

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