/ Plants in bedrooms

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Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
A quick straw poll, ladies and gentlemen - how many of you have plants in your bedroom? I think it's perfectly normal and want some in mine, Mrs Cthulhu thinks it's wrong, and that I'm odd.

What's the general consensus amongst the great and good of UKC?
Queenie - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

It's fine, nothing odd about it.
SCC - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

You're odd.

Nothing wrong with plants, you're just odd....
ebygomm - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

We have plants
rocky57 - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

It depends. Cucumbers and Courgettes might seem out of place, but I don't know your personal circumstances.
LastBoyScout on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

A hazy memory suggests if you want them in the bedroom, then have them during the day and take them out at night - in daytime they take CO2 and turn it into oxygen, but at night they take the oxygen, or something.

We don't have plants in the bedroom, but that's mainly because we haven't anywhere to put them - if you want them, I won't think you're odd (this time).
DynamoCL - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to LastBoyScout:

I have also heard this, during night (times of lack of light) the plants use oxygen in respiration. Not sure how true it is though, but was told that is why nurses took plants away from patients in a hospital I visited.
TryfAndy on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

On my bedroom windowsill I've got a money plant I 'cloned' as part of my school biology lessons that has somehow survived the last 12 or so years, a young coffee plant that outgrows pots on a regular basis, and a tiny douglas fir seedling that I pikeyed from the forest a couple of weeks ago and plan on doing a bonsai job on.
ebygomm - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to LastBoyScout: If i was worried about oxygen levels i'd be better off getting rid of the boyfriend than the plant...
Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to SCC:
> (In reply to Cthulhu)
>
> You're odd.
>
> Nothing wrong with plants, you're just odd....

No I'm not. I have a letter from the doctor confirming it!

Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to LastBoyScout:

I also vaguely remember this from school, but we have a permanently open vent on the window, so not too worried about it...
tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

To worry about the respiration rate of houseplants would make you odd or very paranoid and extremely risk averse.

They're great in all rooms. I particularly like bromeliads and ferns in bedrooms. Light levels depending.

Regards

Herbert west.
Miskatonic university








dissonance - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to rocky57:

yes the exact plants plus size of bedroom has a lot to do with it with whether odd or not.
small amount of greenery i think is good.
RCC - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:
> (In reply to LastBoyScout)
>
> I also vaguely remember this from school, but we have a permanently open vent on the window, so not too worried about it...

Depends on the type of photosynthesis. Some plants fix (or at least absorb) CO2 at night to avoid having to open stomata during the day when water loss (through transpiration) would be too high. Cacti or orchids, for example, use this approach. Bromeliads, too.

In reality, the difference it will make to the oxygen/ co2 balance in the room is next to nothing, even if you're sleeping in a greenhouse!
Robert Durran - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

Plants belong outdoors. In the Wild. Just like animals. Keeping them indoors, unless for scientific research, is weird.
richyfenn on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

Growing up, my parents used to germinate seeds in my bedroom (as well as other rooms). Also my dad brewed his beer in my bedroom (by the airing cupboard) which releases CO2, I slept with the door closed and was never a problem.

Don't worry about having plants in the room at night, you have to fill it with plants to make a real difference plus they release less CO2 at night than they consume during the day. They are tiny, we are huge and create much more CO2 than they could (unless a tree or similar).
Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to Cthulhu)
>
> Plants belong outdoors. In the Wild. Just like animals. Keeping them indoors, unless for scientific research, is weird.

I leave the doors open. My plants are free to roam and, if they wish, to return to the wild. They stay of their own volition...

tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

If have a sunny windowsill, a mixed cacti/succulent/carnivorous plant display looks good, is interesting, and doesn't really intrude into the bedroom itself.

Perhaps you could compromise with Mrs C by fixing a window box at sill level outside?

Cheers

Randolph carter
Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to moraldecay:
> (In reply to Cthulhu)

> Herbert west.
> Miskatonic university

Hehe!
Cthulhu on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to moraldecay:
> (In reply to Cthulhu)

> Randolph carter

A man after my own heart! :o)

Al Evans on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to ebygomm:
> (In reply to LastBoyScout) If i was worried about oxygen levels i'd be better off getting rid of the boyfriend than the plant...

And never sleeping out in the woods.
Al Evans on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:
> (In reply to SCC)
> [...]
>
> No I'm not. I have a letter from the doctor confirming it!

Thats a quote(more or less) from Spike Milligan :-)
tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

i asked my good friend Mr Charles dexter ward, who is currently managing innsmouth garden centre. He says bedroom plants are fine. He says there's no call for Mrs Cthulus attitude.
ice.solo - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to ebygomm)
> [...]
>
> And never sleeping out in the woods.

Beat me to it.

Will be wary of suffocation next time i sleep out (which will be saturday night, so if no one hears from me youll know what happened)
tlm - on 23 Jan 2013
Plants respire all of the time, using up oxygen and given out CO2 (in teeny quantities compared to having another human in the room with you).
During the day, they photosynthesise, producing more oxygen as a by-product than they are using through respiration.
tlm - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

I think you should grow enormous vines on a pergola so that you create a living 4 poster bed.
tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

I wouldn't get into a row over it. That'd just lead to a mountain of madness!

Or you could just go ahead and tell her to keep her tentacles out!

winhill - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

The growlights might stop you getting to sleep, can you put them in the loft like everyone else?
Clarence - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

I have had various rubber plants called Wayne since the mid-80s, they have all lived in my bedroom with no known ill effects. I do talk to Wayne though, he is a good listener although my girlfriends tend to look a bit askance when I ask Wayne for points out of ten after sex (usually with the girlfriend, not Wayne).
ERH - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Cthulhu:

Get loads of plants, and a life insurance policy on her. only have them in the bedroom at night. keep a hidden oxygen cylinder just in case
ads.ukclimbing.com
tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Clarence:

rubber plants are good. Even if y
ou neglect them, they always bounce back.
Timmd on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to moraldecay:There's a fine system in place for jokes like that. (;-))
aln - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to Cthulhu)
>
> Plants belong outdoors. In the Wild. Just like animals. Keeping them indoors, unless for scientific research, is weird.

What about growing them for "recreational" reasons?

tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to Timmd:
can't help it. I must be channeling the spirit of tommy cooper again.
TryfAndy on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to aln:
> (In reply to Robert Durran)
> [...]
>
> What about growing them for "recreational" reasons?

Then they belong in a basement with lots of big lamps and an extractor fan linked into the sewer as an acquaintance of mine used to do. Nothing to see here, officer...
tommycoopersghost on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

Or bring on on windowsill. Then when old enough to sex, plant female specimens in middle of a big patch of stinging nettles in countryside. Let nature take care of the rest.

That's another way to guerilla grow tomatoes.

TryfAndy on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to moraldecay:

Tomatoes and chilli peppers really do take some growing effort. Lots of lights, nutrients etc. Makes you wonder why some people bother...
aln - on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to TryfAndy: You seem to know rather a lot about growing these plants... What, tomatoes and chilli's you say? Sorry, my mistake.
TryfAndy on 23 Jan 2013
In reply to aln:

I have green-fingered friends!

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