/ Read "A brief history of time", what book next

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jezb1 - on 01 Feb 2013
Read the above book and really enjoyed it, even understood some of it.

Any suggestions of a similar style book to build upon my knowledge or bring it more upto date?
JimboWizbo - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:
The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene is good
john arran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Why stop at time? Bill Bryson's 'A Short History of Nearly Everything' is amazing in its scope and accessibility.
john arran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to john arran:

Another top recommendation is 'How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog' by Chad Orzel. Made me feel like I was even understanding it - until I tried to explain it later!
Quad on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: Why does E=mc2? by Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw
Bloodfire - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: The Quark and the Jaguar. Absolutely fantasic book looking into the simple and the complex.
Al Evans on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: Isn't this book supposed to be akin to 'The End Of History And The Last Man' by Francis Fukuyama, Which I have also possessed for years and not read (has anybody/)
Robert Durran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

I'm nearly finished reading "The Trouble With Physics" by Lee Smolin. Not technical but very clearly written for the layman on the state of theoretical physics and why he thinks there are problems with the directions being taken. His treatment of String Theory is very readable and interesting and much less hardwork than Brian Greene's!
Robert Durran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Quad:
> (In reply to jezb1) Why does E=mc2? by Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw

Excellent, but you'll need to get stuck into some maths to get the most out of it!

Robert Durran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Bloodfire:
> (In reply to jezb1) The Quark and the Jaguar. Absolutely fantasic book looking into the simple and the complex.

I'll second that.

Trangia - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

"The Hunded Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window"

One of the funniest books I've read for ages.
winhill - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

A Universe from Nothing by Lawrence Krauss, it's the business.
jezb1 - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: Thanks for all the recommendations, will have a look at them :)
Coel Hellier - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Sean Carroll's "The particle at the end of the universe", all about the Higgs.
Fredt on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Look at 'The Dancing Wu Li Masters', by Gary Zukav

I understood that one.
Jimbo W on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Coel Hellier:

> Sean Carroll's "The particle at the end of the universe", all about the Higgs.

How much maths do you need for that one?
Robert Durran - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Quad:
> (In reply to jezb1) Why does E=mc2? by Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw

Their quantun mechanics book is also very good.
cb294 - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Singh "Big Bang".

Feynman " Six Easy Pieces"

Both are very readable and accessible.

CB
SI - profile removed on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: Guns, Germs and Steal by Jared Diamond. Awesome read.
andic - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Zero

is quite a good read
graeme jackson - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Cosmos - Carl Sagan, is a superb read
Coel Hellier - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Jimbo W:

> How much maths do you need for that one?

It's a popular level book, not a mathematical one, and should be ok for anyone interested in science. http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=421804
Skyhook on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

> Any suggestions of a similar style book to build upon my knowledge or bring it more upto date?

Roger Penrose - The Emperor's New Mind
sbc_10 - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Skyhook:
>
> Roger Penrose - The Emperor's New Mind


I think that might be a little bit of a quantum leap "up" from the usual introductory text. You have to be quiet determined to plough through the axioms surrounding the proofs. It doesnt let you off the hook either, if you miss a step in logic then it all becomes a bit intractable.
A tough read...

cb294 - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to shaun l:
> (In reply to jezb1) Guns, Germs and Steal by Jared Diamond. Awesome read.

+10

CB
Jimbo W on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Coel Hellier:

> It's a popular level book, not a mathematical one, and should be ok for anyone interested in science. http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=421804

Thanks. I think I might order it!
AdrianC - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: +1 for The Elegant Universe. And Your Inner Fish by Neil Shubin is a fascinating look at evolution.
Dave Kerr - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Skyhook:
> (In reply to jezb1)
>
> [...]
>
> Roger Penrose - The Emperor's New Mind

I've been trying to read that for the last 20 years.

marsbar - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: John Gribbin maybe?

Gordon Stainforth - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to AdrianC:

Umm. Thought Shubin's book was very underwhelming, and quite remarkable for how little it told us, particularly about what's been going on in biological science over at least the last 15 yrs.
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andyb211 - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1: Charlie and the chocolate Factory
Coel Hellier - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

> Thought Shubin's book was very underwhelming, ...

I liked it, a clear and incisive account of the deep biological links demonstrating the common ancestry of fish and humans, all at a level understandable by everyone.

> ... and quite remarkable for how little it told us ...

What did you want it to tell you about?
ledifer on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

another vote for how to teach quantum physics to your dog. Plenty of physics in there without being a bit dry.
adstapleton - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
2nd The Trouble with Physics - but you get more out of it if you've studied a masters in theoretical physics i reckon.

Elegant Universe by Brian Green is Okaaaaay

Tried Fermat's Last Theorem by Simon Singh? Very well written and wonderfully insightful. A bit more niche market than your TOE physics but in a similar realm
Professor Bunsen - on 02 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Sam Kean's The Disappearing Spoon is an entertaining tour through the periodic table, albeit not quite the realm the OP asked for.
Jon Stewart - on 02 Feb 2013
In reply to jezb1:

Great recommendations on here.

The Fabric Of Reality by David Deutsch is a remarkable book, but it's now years since I read it and can't remember precisely what his point was. But it ties together the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics with Turing's ideas about computation, some vaguely Popperian philosophy and something else, and makes it seem like a completely revolutionary new description of reality itself (it's about more than just what the universe 'out there' is like). I'd love to read it again in fact, maybe a bit more would stick second time round.
Al Evans on 02 Feb 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart: So nobody really has managed Francis Fukuyama's 'The End of History and The Last Man' Shame I was going to ask for advice on how hard going this 'definitive' book is :-( and whether I should try again with my pristine hardbook copy.

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