/ BBC 999 - Mountain Rescue...I was one of the 'stars'

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davidrj1 - on 22 Mar 2013
I know there was a rescue topic in recent days and I am afraid I am continuing with this topic! But it’s probably right that I do as I was one of the stars of a recent BBC documentary episode, Country 999 which is being aired at the moment on BBC in the afternoon. Check out iplayer:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01rj1cv/Countryside_999_Episode_4/

I am an occasional user of this site and so far haven’t discussed our incident but I think now is timely! If you watch it, I am the guy with the white helmet on and I’m sharing this so others can hopefully take some lessons from our misadventure. I’m also doing it to highlight the great work the Royal Navy SAR team did.

As the programme shows, we were on Buachaille Etive Mor and the incident took place very early December during the first significant cold snap and winter flurries. We were raring to get out for our first winter route and the weather was crisp and sunny so everything was set up for a cracking day (how many incident stories start this way!?). We knew conditions were early season and for that reason thought a ridge route would be in order. We’re not alpine super stars but neither are we inexperienced. Two of our party which included myself, had previously completed Curved Ridge in summer time (nice but straight forward) and had always meant to do it in winter. Being a grade 2, within our abilities and being a ridge with some nice views, we thought it would be a good one to kick off the season. Because of our confidence we invited a friend who is less experienced with winter but none the less is a capable and fit climber. We thought the 3 of us would move together alpine style.

With hindsight I still sometimes wonder how it all went so badly wrong! Part of it was certainly a blaze attitude to it all. We were late starting (about 9.30am), were confident because of the grade and because we had done it before, albeit in summer, hadn’t spent enough time studying the route beforehand. I certainly expected it all to make sense the way it had in summer (I should have known better having done the anoch eagah in both winter and summer).

If anything, the day started rather disappointingly. The route lower down wasn’t in nick and it proved to be a bit of a scramble up frozen turf and powder icy snow. I was regretting choosing the route and wishing we had gone elsewhere. However we continued because we were on it...It was after lunch things started to go a really wrong. Myself and my friend had both done it but had done it independently from one another. We ended up having a bit of a debate about which way to go. We’d been mountaineering together quite a bit including having both been to the alps together, so there is a fair bit of trust (we’d been out on the piss a couple of days earlier in Glasgow with no incidents :)). None the less we couldn’t agree on this. He was leading however and the best technical description of the route we took is we started to go a bit too ‘left’. We ended up on very steep, exposed and rubbish ground which was beyond grade 2. Again we disagreed on what to do. This terrain was slowing our progress right down and at this point we could have abseiled down and clambered down the way we’d came. I was reluctant to do this, as was he, which was a mistake, with much of my motive being I didn’t want to disappoint our third climbing friend. I also thought we would soon find the route or ‘a route’ and generally get out of it. This didn’t happen! The other lesson was that in early winter routes the day light is very limited (I’m pointing out the obvious but it came in very quickly). I was ok about us coming down the mountain trail with head torches but far more nervous about climbing the crag in the dark and snow. At about 3.00pm I was getting worried. Instead of getting easier, it was getting worse. My friend who had been leading proceeded up a section which he really struggled with. The crag was loose and horrible with few protection points. At this point we were in a precarious position, he was ‘crag fast’. Myself and my other friend were fixed into the mountain but he couldn’t find any protection , he kept on climbing but it only made things worse. I was really worried that he would fall and not only severely injure himself but either fall onto us or rip us all of the mountain (i didn’t completely trust the gear we were attached to). He got to a point and by this time it was pushing 4.00pm and it was dark. He managed to put a sling in but it wasn’t great. We couldn’t see him or get to him and he wasn’t confident about abseiling down from his one piece of protection. It was at this time that I knew we had to do the previously unthinkable and call mountain rescue. Thankfully I had a phone reception.

The whole process there after is captured in the BBC programme and I have nothing but respect and thanks for the guys and girls who helped us. Because of our position a helicopter was dispatched and Glencoe mountain rescue were also scrambled. You can see from the footage the helicopter rescued us and apart from some bruised egos and a little bit of physical bruising we were ok. The Royal Navy team are first class and the Glencoe guys, although we never met them, were great too and it was good to know we had them there. If I appeared to smirk on camera it was only because I saw a camera stuck in my face which was the last thing I expected! Afterwards, I felt some guilt because I was aware of the cost of rescuing us. I also felt some non outdoors people judged us but most people were ok and everyone was relieved we were fine. Regarding the cost, I sort of justified it two days after when I was overtaken on the road whilst driving by a guy on a blind corner who nearly hit an oncoming car. He took more risks than we did.

Nothing ‘big’ happened to us which led to the incident. It was a series of small, poor decisions which mounted up which in winter magnify and for me not trusting my instinct. I should have put my foot down and we should have turned back when we could. It was just crazy how all those things came together and led us to where we were...PS the rest of the show is a bit crap isn’t it!? A guy with no van insurance, is that what we pay the licence for?? I digress...


alan wilson on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1: I saw that show, and thought it interesting when the lassie said "they are well prepared, they have crampons with them but are not wearing them". I can only assume the conditions were loose powder and rock I guess. Glad all safe.
GPN - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1:
Are autographs available?
davidrj1 - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to alan wilson: Thanks! higher up it was better but we had started to stow away our gear in antipcation of the rescue.
davidrj1 - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to GPN: Haha I've been getting asked this by my friends. Thanks to facebook the jokes started quickly. I'm probably famous enough to be asked if I want to be in the big brother house or the Jungle...
davidrj1 - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1: I should say, I know curved ridge is a grade 2/3 and I referred it to as a grade 2 in my post which I did in my haste as I was typing this out.
Doghouse - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1:

So you called the MRT because you were benighted?
mick taylor - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1: Dont quite know what to say, other then ask what you had for your lunch.

I'm still undecided as to which post/thread has made me laugh the most. It's between this one, the bloke digging his wife out of a stream bed avalanche (skew ghyll) and the cornice shinanigans on smiths. Anyway, you've cheered a very miserable person up (and I am glad you're all safe).
martinph78 on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1: Was interesting to see the rescue operation in such detail (from the helicopter). Top job.


pamph - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1: Glad that you are all well and none the worse for the experience, but I am curious to know whether having a mobile phone with you had any bearing on your decision to press on? I only ask because as an old and not very bold climber now, the possibility of benightment and little possibility of rescue in the days before mobile phones meant that I personaly probably would have backed off earlier. I am in no way criticising you or your friends, and the question is asked purely from an interest point of view. Just to reiterate before the UKClimbing rotwielers start on me, I am not having a go at you or your friends! As an ex-member of the RAF MRT I have always felt that as a volunteer team member I was, and still am, in no position to judge.
Ron Walker - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1:

Saw this the other day and wondered if it was the rescue from earlier this winter.
Thanks for posting your story and the lead up to the rescue. All small things that with hindsite you'll do differently, now I'm sure.
Hopefully it'll help others avoid getting into a similar situation in the future, so thanks...

Cheers Ron
fmck - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to pamph:

I would agree but maybe its just as well. I just think back on some of the seriously dodgy winter gear we relied on to get ourselves off on purely because no one was there to help.
pamph - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to pamph)
>
> I would agree but maybe its just as well. I just think back on some of the seriously dodgy winter gear we relied on to get ourselves off on purely because no one was there to help.

Yes, I think I can remember the tied-off knifeblade and well dodgy flake poking out of the snow on a ledge as we baled out from a ill-advised and badly judged attempt at a line we had spotted somewhere between Number 4 and Number 5 gullies, back in the late seventies! At the time I was barely capable of getting up a Grade III and I think we were on something considerably harder. I just kept going, as retreat was unthinkable....until I was left with no option.
coinneach - on 22 Mar 2013
In reply to fmck:

So the painter & decorator bloke .........?


Did he get his van back off the polis or not .........?
Busby - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1:

To be fair I think that anyone who has spent anytime in the hills can relate to this. Small mistakes can and do escalate at an alarming rate, from personal experience, the smaller the issue(/s) and the more people involved the quicker it can turn into the proverbial shit storm.

You tried to get out, it didn't work, I'm sure lesson's were learnt, the main thing is you did the obligatory part of mountaineering, you got back down the hill without putting yourself at further risk.

Too many people are too quick to judge when there are no fatalities, no one can judge your actions if they weren't on the same hill/route on the same day.

We all know how variable conditions can be.


Cheers


Iain.
Michael Ryan - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to Doghouse:
> (In reply to davidrjack1)
>
> So you called the MRT because you were benighted?

Cragfast.

There's a big difference and it is easy to get in that situation where the leader has gone off-route and is a dangerous situation and can't move.

David Reid - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrjack1:

Its far too easy to carry on upwards when things just arent flowing properly, either way no one can fault your honesty !!
fmck - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to pamph:

Brings to mind a similar situation on Arran. We traversed to find a way through a band of steep blank slabs . Ended up digging out all but one spike on the ledge as they one by one turned out to be just boulders. My mate said don't dig out the last as it was the only option.

All the same it would be embarrassing to have to be rescued for getting stuck!
andymuir - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to pamph: Is that Pete"Ive got a GTi"Apmphlete? Luechars MRT early eighties?
trouserburp - on 23 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrj1:

Thanks for that, good programme with the extra info and the angle that you were pretty clued up climbers. I'm sure most of us have had some close calls that could have ended in a MRT/helicopter rescue. Better you called them before an injury rather than taking a major risk of calling them after.
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davidrj1 - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to Doghouse: No we didn't! Trust me, it was a very reluctant decision and one we only took after discussing the options (as best as we could given we didn't have a clear line of sight between us). The Royal Navy Team actually told us we did the right thing. Essentially my mate as lead had gotten himself badly stuck. He wasn't confident abseiling down and I wasn't confident him doing it either. Trying to assist him ourselves seemed out of the question as I think we would have simply got ourselves into the same situation. Had it just been myself and my other friend, we would have waited the night out. We had warm clothing and survival bags and could have abseiled down two pitches in the morning and scrambled down the rest. The weather was a factor in our decision as I was worried how long he could perch where he was but it wasn't the whole one.
davidrj1 - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to pamph: Hi, fair question but no is the answer. I didn't even know I had reception until we found ourselves in the situation we did. I was relieved that I did!! The main decision to crack on was based on a belief that it would some how get easier, we would find the route (or a route!) and believe it or not a bit o pride which seems silly now.
Doghouse - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrj1:

Cool, fair enough :-)
pamph - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrj1:
> (In reply to pamph) Hi, fair question but no is the answer. I didn't even know I had reception until we found ourselves in the situation we did. I was relieved that I did!! The main decision to crack on was based on a belief that it would some how get easier, we would find the route (or a route!) and believe it or not a bit o pride which seems silly now.

It might seem silly now, but I can sympathise with the sentiment of wanting to carry on, hoping for better things; sometimes they appear! But sometimes they don't, as you know.
Here's hoping the next epic is less, um... epic for you all!
abbeywall - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to davidrj1: I always knew these guys were professional and worked in high risk situations but seeing it in action is something else. The rescue was seriously impressive. I didn't see a smirk just a look of sheer relief that you had come through. Thanks for posting the link. Found it pretty gripping.

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