/ NEWS: Scotland's Yeti - Historic Hoax Exposed

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UKC News - on 01 Apr 2013
Brocken Spectre, 2 kbA Scottish mountain myth has been spectacularly debunked with the discovery of papers that shed light on a Century-long conspiracy

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=67954
highlanderwolf - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News:
Ha ha very good. What a tale that would have been!
xplorer on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Poor
ericinbristol - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to xplorer:

Nah, entertaining stuff - thanks UKC
Guy Atkinson - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News:
"like"
Gordon Stainforth - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News:

I can reveal that the Great Grey Man's sibling, who is alive and well in the Belper area, has just emerged rather grumpily from under the duvet and announced that she is going to make coffee, on this rather raw and cold first day of the month.
xplorer on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to ericinbristol

Eat your heart out, why don't you read it again
Dave P - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Spoilsports!
Gordon Stainforth - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Dave P:

BTW, I'm not casting any doubt on the story, just pointing out that there may be more than one.
Troy Tempest - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to UKC News: It was good until the last couple of paragraphs. There was a brilliant one a couple of years ago about a crag falling over that seemed to have few people hooked
Al Evans on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Mighty Max: Was that the one Geoff Birtles published about the Cioch Block on Skye falling off, I actually believed that for a while as it wasn't April First when I read it.
Al Evans on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Al Evans: Not the longest last Scottish Hoax though, or is it not a hoax?

"Saint Columba (6th century)

The earliest report of a monster associated with the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Columba by Adomnán, written in the 7th century.[17] According to Adomnán, writing about a century after the events he described, the Irish monk Saint Columba was staying in the land of the Picts with his companions when he came across the locals burying a man by the River Ness. They explained that the man had been swimming the river when he was attacked by a "water beast" that had mauled him and dragged him under. They tried to rescue him in a boat, but were able only to drag up his corpse. Hearing this, Columba stunned the Picts by sending his follower Luigne moccu Min to swim across the river. The beast came after him, but Columba made the sign of the cross and commanded: "Go no further. Do not touch the man. Go back at once."[18] The beast immediately halted as if it had been "pulled back with ropes" and fled in terror, and both Columba's men and the pagan Picts praised God for the miracle."
cheeky - on 01 Apr 2013
Not as good as the British trad climbing grading system being changed!!!

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