/ Teaching others to teach belaying

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RKernan - on 15 Aug 2013
I work at a wall which is looking into taking part in the NICAS scheme. There's a bit of confusion about site specific requirements - what's the consensus on teaching tying in/belaying - to assess site-specific instructors to teach belaying/tying in do you need an MIA yourself or is a suitably qualified SPA up to the task?
oggi on 15 Aug 2013
In reply to RKernan: Have a look at the NICAS handbook and it states that the wall must have a technical advisor at MIA or above which seems to answer your question.
RKernan - on 15 Aug 2013
In reply to oggi:

THat's what I thought. This is slightly separate to the NICAS thing though - it's more of a general question regarding site-specific qualifications. The place is an autobelay wall so the instructors don't need CWA/SPA etc - they just need to be signed off by one of the senior instructors. But if we start introducing ropes/tying in/belaying, it makes things slightly more complicated.
nickcj - on 15 Aug 2013
In reply to RKernan:

Best practise would be to get a technical advisor who holds the MIA as a minimum to write a statement of competence for staff to cover tying-on, belaying etc.

I'm a technical advisor to a couple of walls on the NICAS scheme. Please send me a direct message if you want anymore info.
Andy Say - on 15 Aug 2013
In reply to RKernan:
> I work at a wall which is looking into taking part in the NICAS scheme. There's a bit of confusion about site specific requirements - what's the consensus on teaching tying in/belaying - to assess site-specific instructors to teach belaying/tying in do you need an MIA yourself or is a suitably qualified SPA up to the task?

I think you mean suitably 'experienced' SPA as there isn't really such as thing as a 'suitably qualified SPA' technical adviser.

I do know that AALS are developing very strong views on the 'dilution' of responsibility that they see happening; not just with non-MIA Technical Advisers but with Technical Advisers 'signing-off' people to 'sign-off' others.

The bottom line, however, would seem to be that in the event of an accident you can demonstrate that you have taken all reasonable measures to assure the competence of those working at your wall. Current good practice would seem to be that a suitable experienced MIA+ who acts as technical adviser and staff trainer/assessor is a suitable reasonable measure. If you don't want to go that route that is up to you.
RKernan - on 16 Aug 2013
In reply to Andy Say:

THanks guys. Yes, of course 'suitably experienced' is what I meant, 'suitavbly qualified SPA' is a bit oxymoronic. I think we'll bring in an MIA for the job 'to be sure to be sure'.
andyathome - on 16 Aug 2013
In reply to RKernan:
> (In reply to Andy Say)
>
> 'to be sure to be sure'.

You really are Irish, then :-)

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