/ Lightroom Question

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Fredt on 31 Aug 2013
It is gradually dawning on me that an original RAW file needs sharpening, and is not, as I assumed, sharpest by default.

First, is this true?

If so, what is the amount and type of sharpening that I should use as a default, i.e. the amount an auto-sharp function would use when creating jpegs in camera. I can use then use this as a baseline for further experiments.

What would be the different type and amount of sharpening for screen and print?

Thanks in advance.
Marc Elliott - on 31 Aug 2013
In reply to Fredt: I always apply as small amount of post capture sharpening to my Raw files ... as a default I use a rad of .9 and an amount of around 30. And find that is enough the to cancel out the effects of anti aliasing filter that is in most digital camera's . The only other sharpening that is required after that is once you have resized for the web, or resized and preparing to print.
John2 - on 31 Aug 2013
In reply to Fredt: The amount of sharpening required depends on the subject matter and other aspects of the photograph. In the develop module look under Presets on the left hand side then Lightroom General Presets. Sharpen - faces is a good starting point for portraits, as is Shapren - Scenic for landscapes. But you will usually need to add more or less to these starting points. When sharpening always click on the image to display it at maximum resolution.
Max Harms on 31 Aug 2013
In reply to Fredt: also try holding down the alt key it helps show you which areas are affected, really useful when using masking and radius tools
Hannes on 31 Aug 2013
In reply to Fredt: you also generally want more sharpening if you are printing the photos than you want when viewing them on a screen
In reply to Fredt:

When you "export" the image you get the options of amount/type of sharpening depending on the end use: print/screen matt/gloss paper and degree of sharpening required etc. etc.


Chris
Fredt on 01 Sep 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:
> (In reply to Fredt)
>
> When you "export" the image you get the options of amount/type of sharpening depending on the end use: print/screen matt/gloss paper and degree of sharpening required etc. etc.
>
>
> Chris

That was one of my problems, I tended to sharpen in Lightroom, and not realise that more sharpening would be done on export, and so got very over sharpened pictures. Took me a while to figure that out.
John2 - on 01 Sep 2013
In reply to Fredt: The idea is that you perform capture sharpening to make the image look as sharp as possible on your computer screen, then on export you apply print sharpening which varies in intensity depending on the size of the print you wish to make and the type of paper that you are printing on.
Marc Elliott - on 02 Sep 2013
In reply to Fredt:

"That was one of my problems, I tended to sharpen in Lightroom, and not realise that more sharpening would be done on export, and so got very over sharpened pictures. Took me a while to figure that out."

This is why I do a very amount of post capture sharpen, and then no more until I ater I have re-sized for web, or preparation for print.

Viewed at 100% with a small amount of post capture sharpening, your picture ( provided it has been well focused ) should look sharp. When you resize a picture, you will lose sharpness - and that why we sharpen only after re-sizing, the same is for print.



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