/ coiling a wet rope ...how?

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colina - on 09 Sep 2013
saw a video somewhere of how to coil a rope to dry out..seem to recall it was some kind of daisy chain type coil technique..looking to see a demo on youtube but cant see one.
anyone got any views to how to dry out a standard climbing rope?
August West on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina:

Try this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75XNCMKW7XE

I didn't have the sound on so can't comment on what he's saying but the pictures show what I do with my wet caving ropes.
Cameron94 on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: As the poster above said daisy chains are a good way to coil it so that it can dry out. I usually do it as a single strand or a double strand rather than a four stand piece.

Doesn't take long to do and it's even quicker to undo.
highclimber - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Cameron94: I got told by a very experienced climber that daisy chains damage the rope! Believe it or not - i didn't believe him and have been doing it ever since to dry my ropes out and they haven't snapped yet!

Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: I always daisychain them (called shanking by cavers) whether or not theyre wet. When unshanking them you must be careful. After taking out the loops so you have a length thats 8 strands thick, separate the two groups of 4 first before flaking it or it will tangle badly.
colina - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Red Rover: not quite sure wot you mean red ?
Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina:

To shank the rope, you first double it up to 2 strands, then 4 then 8 before making the loops. Although I think the guy in the video only goes to 4. When you unshank it, instead of pulling all the loops out and flaking it out, pull the loops out, then separate out the two groups of 4 strands, so you are reversing the final step before you put the loops in, before flaking it out. Sorry if this doesnt make sense it's easier to do than say.
colina - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Red Rover: ah yes ,see wot you mean now,suppose you can decide to do daisy chain it singly double or quadruple,does it make a difference I wonder ,or do you think quadrupling (is that a word!) more efficient?
Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: I always go up to 8 but I dont really know if thats necessary it's just what I was taught. I'd just have a play around and see what you prefer.
GridNorth - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: Can someone please explain to me the advantage of coiling a rope this way. Why should it dry any quicker than just loose coils?
lynx3555 - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: "loop coiling" or AKA "daisy chaining" has been the standard way that rope access personnel have coiled both Static and Dynanic ropes for 30 years.....I've never known it to damage ropes.
Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to GridNorth: it dries quicker because the air can get to more of it.In a climbers coil much of it is surrounded by more rope rather than the air, in a shank theres much more surface area for it to dry.
GridNorth - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Red Rover: Not convinced I'm afraid. I'm not even sure that what you say is accurate. I would have thought loose, laid out coils would expose the rope more effectively.
Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to GridNorth: Fair enough. Need to get mythbusters on the case! Would make for a boring episode though.
colina - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Red Rover:

wondering also if it will put twists in the rop after ?
Lusk - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina:

I usually chain link without doubling etc up, occasionally double up, never had any kinking problems.
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Red Rover - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to colina: Never had any kinks in the rope. I go for an 8fold shank because I'm used to doing it with really long ropes.

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