/ help my curries too hot

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lost1977 - on 20 Sep 2013
yesterday i made an awesome BNS and paneer curry which does taste very good, problem is that it is just too damn hot and i am struggling. any suggestions (hopefully ones which wont make it too creamy as i dont think that would work that well)
ebygomm - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Lemon/Lime juice can help, something to do with the acidity
marsbar - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977: Have a yoghurt drink with it?
Skol on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
Craime freche
John_Hat - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Dilute is about the only option - i.e. more of everything apart from the heat.

You could make another one to the same recipe without the "hot" spices and then mix them together, stuff 'em in a casserole dish in the over for an hour, stirring every 15 mins.
Ramblin dave - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
Grow a pair.

Alternatively, glass of milk on the side, bog roll in the fridge.
puppythedog on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977: Add quark, if you're adding it to the hot (as in temperature)curry slake it first in some cold water to avoid splitting.
Big Steve - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977: Man up, or just swallow it quickly
lost1977 - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to John_Hat:

thats actually a very good idea and i probably have enough of the other ingredients top do it.
lost1977 - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave and big steve:

trust me you wouldnt be saying that if you had just had a mouthful, thing is i cant work out why its quite as hot as it is (annoying thing is its really tasty)
andymac - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:
> (In reply to lost1977)
> Grow a pair.
>
> Alternatively, glass of milk on the side, bog roll in the fridge.

I like that.

Real men don't admit to a curry being too hot.

Far more acceptable to cause permanent damage to your tonsils and vocal cords.
lost1977 - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to andymac:

but how can i serve it to others... thats my excuse and i'm sticking to it
andymac - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

I would apologise in advance ,saying the curry is rather mild.

Then sit and enjoy the spectacle.

Am I evil?
puppythedog on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to andymac: i'd go with that but first really softem my portion and add tabasco
MJ - on 20 Sep 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:

Alternatively, glass of milk on the side, bog roll in the fridge.

and a Tiptop in the freezer...
andrewmcleod - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Sugar (possibly?)
dissonance - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
> (In reply to andymac)
>
> but how can i serve it to others

alcohol, lots of alcohol.

ice.solo - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to andrewmcleod:
> (In reply to lost1977)
>
> Sugar (possibly?)

Yep. Preferably jaggery or palm sugar. Something to do with alkaloids. And when eaten with rice will take more edge off.

Tony Naylor on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
The heat comes from capsicain. It's not soluble in water or alcohol, but it is fat-soluble. This is why in India hot food is often followed by lhassi, a milk-based drink.

So to lower the heat, you add fats. Straight into the dish with cream or yoghurt or coconut milk; or you could go with the heat but wash it down with milk or similar.

As predicaments go, you've got yourself a rather nice one :-)
seankenny - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Put in some coconut milk, eat with rice and a little mild dal, should be fine.
rubisco - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

My curry cookbook has a section on how to rescue mishaps. It recommends:

"If the curry has become too hot and contains tomatoes and/or yogurt and/or coconut milk, add an extra tomato or two and 1/2 to 1 tsp of sugar and cook through. If the curry is a sour one, add more of the souring agent, e.g. tamarind, vinegar, lime, lemon etc."
John_Hat - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
> (In reply to John_Hat)
>
> thats actually a very good idea and i probably have enough of the other ingredients top do it.

I have been in your position myself before...
Trangia - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

As others have said dilute it by making an additional mixture of the same ingrediants (apart from chillies and curry) to mix into it.

Freeze the surplus to enjoy another day.
mwr72 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

BNS?

As has been suggested, try coconut milk, and reduce.

Mrs mwr made a Blue Ribbon award winning Chilli, an American recipe, it was ludicrously hot, so much so that my brother couldn't even take a mouthful(and he's a fan of the Fahl)!

I told her to bin it and chalk it up to experience, and next time to add the hot ingredients to taste later, something which I've always done when cooking a curry. If you can't rescue this one then I suggest you follow this advice! ;)

mattrm - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

As at least someone else has suggested, drink Lhassi with it.
thin bob on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
I have wondered about adding a neutral-tasting fat to a too-hot dish and scooping it out later (as the hot element, capascin, is fat-soluble). Don't want to risk ruining a good dish, so never tried it.
Tony Naylor on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to mwr72:
> Mrs mwr made a Blue Ribbon award winning Chilli, an American recipe

I'm intrigued. Is there any chance you could post the recipe, please?
mwr72 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to Tony Naylor:

I will as SWMBO when she finishes showering.
seankenny - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to mwr72:
>
> add the hot ingredients to taste later

No way! Chillies and other spices should be put in right at the beginning, usually by tempering the oil with them in.

lost1977 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to mwr72:

BNS = Butternut squash
felt - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Not at all relevant, but Ted, the dude on the left would lap it up:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPEZEC7fMRc
mwr72 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:
> (In reply to mwr72)
>
> BNS = Butternut squash

Ahh, thank you :)
mwr72 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to seankenny:
> (In reply to mwr72)
> [...]
>
> No way! Chillies and other spices should be put in right at the beginning, usually by tempering the oil with them in.


No no nooo, that is all wrong!

The oil should be tempered with 5 cardamom pods and a 5 cm stick of cinnamon, all of which should be removed after about 30 seconds in the hot oil.
Nevis-the-cat - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Yoghurt or anything milk based as the proteins bind to the chillies .

or take the pain and earn a blue star (to be awarded when I next see you)
seankenny - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to mwr72:

It's different for different recipies, but I can assure you (from seeing brown folk cook curry every day) that spices are usually put in at the beginning. White people may of course cook curries differently!
Dominion - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Milk apparently is the way to cool things off.

I can certainly testify that if you rub your eyes after you have been chopping chillies, do not try to flush your eyes with water.

And trying to look up what you should do in those circumstances is completely impossible, as you cannot even open your eyes...

lost1977 - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to felt:

did i forget to mention my chilli powder blend does contain nagga
ripper - on 21 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977: my curry - of which I'm chewing the last mouthful as I type - is spot on. just saying like...
mwr72 - on 22 Sep 2013
In reply to Tony Naylor:

This, I think, is the chilli recipe that SWMBO made.

http://www.momswhothink.com/chili-recipes/world-champion-chili.html
felt - on 23 Sep 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Ah, good. Lovely flavour, can't get enough of it; very morich.
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