/ rope handling without teeth

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LeeWood - on 19 Oct 2013
It hasn't happened yet, but I can see the day coming when I may not wish to use my teeth for the pull through. Does anyone got efficient alternate methods for rope handling while clipping-in?
highclimber - on 19 Oct 2013
LeeWood - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber: Yes, I can see some sense in just climbing higher; however, the height at which the clip 'should' be made is often an evident strategy w r t hold proximity, ie. climbing higher may push you into a sustained section where it would cost more energy / efficiency from where to clip.
petegunn on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood: About 10 years ago a mate from uni had taken the rope by his teeth whilst pulling up slack and consequently bit down hard as he fell off riping his two front teeth clean out! So clean that they were simply pushed back into the sockets (at hospital) so maybe hold it with your chin!
Bulls Crack - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to petegunn:

They found the teeth?!
Kevin Woods - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to petegunn:

*squirm*!!
JJL - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:

I guess, once in a very long while, in extremis, you might pull the rope through with your teeth. Maybe your hands have frozen to the axe or something.

Most of the time you have a hand free for "the pull through".

So. Pull through.

If you still need more rope, and so need to prevent the rope you've already pulled through from slipping back, use anything you like to hold it:
- your teeth (although others have noted a possibly more serious downside than not liking the taste)
- elbow
- shoulder
- chin
- knee
- thigh
- ankle
- shin
- forehead
- chest
- hip


Just take the rope and pin it to the rock with whatever is most convenient. If you're in a hurry, just suck up the rancid taste of sweat, magnesium carbonate, more sweat and stale saliva, and camel-lip it. It saves your front teeth if you're a biter not a screamer.

J
LeeWood - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to JJL: haha, I can see I might have to accept some falling, myself or more likely my grade.

I've had a couple of practical ideas to deal with the issue. Use of a yachting cleat, or a hook, but not apparent where they/it should be mounted.
chris fox on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:

Well this is on a 7b so maybe you'll always do it !

http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=86819
bpmclimb - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:
> (In reply to highclimber) Yes, I can see some sense in just climbing higher; however, the height at which the clip 'should' be made is often an evident strategy w r t hold proximity, ie. climbing higher may push you into a sustained section where it would cost more energy / efficiency from where to clip.

I always thought that a well-bolted route should, in general, have bolts in positions from which the rope can be clipped from a stable position, without having to reach up overmuch. I know there are other factors which influence the positions of bolts, such as runner spacing and rock solidity, and that not every sport route is well-bolted, but you almost sound as though you think that the bolt positions are completely arbitrary.
bpmclimb - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

By arbitrary, I mean unrelated to the positions of the best holds.
BMrider - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:
I thought, from the subject title, this was the sort of threat issued on the Lhotse Face, ie: "You'll be rope handling without teeth, Pal!"
LeeWood - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to chris fox: bite on a bight hehe
LeeWood - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb: absolutely the converse; I usually read the position of a key hold intended for the clip, and that is not necessarily 'high' but nevertheless involves pulling through >1 arm's length
Simos on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to petegunn:

Cr@p so it does happen! (was my main fear when using my teeth...)
purplemonkeyelephant - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:

Considering how much people put rope in their mouth when clipping, I'm surprised someone hasn't invented a little device that perhaps goes on your harness or helmet and perhaps has teeth so when you drop your rope into it, the device holds on so you can pull another arms length up.

I grip it with my lips over my teeth so it's not actually coming into contact with the gnashers.

LeeWood - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to purplemonkeyelephant: I'm thinking a useful device would have to be mounted on both shoulders
LeeWood - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to purplemonkeyelephant:
> (In reply to LeeWood)
>
> I grip it with my lips over my teeth so it's not actually coming into contact with the gnashers.

Do you play the trumpet?
wercat on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:

I actually lost one of my top front teeth FOR GOOD from holding the rope in my mouth.

It takes some adjusting to the situation as there is no good substitute for the manufacturers original parts!
purplemonkeyelephant - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:

Nah. Saxophone though?
Jonny2vests - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
> (In reply to LeeWood)
> [...]
>
> I always thought that a well-bolted route should, in general, have bolts in positions from which the rope can be clipped from a stable position, without having to reach up overmuch. I know there are other factors which influence the positions of bolts, such as runner spacing and rock solidity, and that not every sport route is well-bolted

Surely the most obvious factor is that one man's jug is another man's crimp, so 'stable position' is very dependent.

I personally don't see anything wrong with using your teeth (as long as your not daft enough to keep it in your mouth during a fall). As someone said, clipping at waist level isn't always practical, and even for close by clips, you may have drag to contend with.
jayjackson - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:
If I have to pull up an extra armful of slack (if as other posters have mentioned it isn't possible or sensible to clip from a higher hold) I'll pull up an armful, jam it between my chin and my chest, then pull up another armful.
Can't see any issues with it catching if I fall mid clip - not met anyone who would keep their chin pressed to their chest whilst falling!
bpmclimb - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
> [...]
>
> Surely the most obvious factor is that one man's jug is another man's crimp, so 'stable position' is very dependent.
>
> I personally don't see anything wrong with using your teeth (as long as your not daft enough to keep it in your mouth during a fall). As someone said, clipping at waist level isn't always practical, and even for close by clips, you may have drag to contend with.


Agreed, nothing wrong with using your teeth. However, stretching to make clips can become the default procedure - a nervous habit, which is actually quite common - in which case many of the better clip positions are probably being missed.

Jonny2vests - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Guilty as charged.
deepsoup - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to LeeWood:
He was abandoned as a baby and raised by orang-utangs. You should see him shell a peanut. ;o)
ads.ukclimbing.com
deepsoup - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Simos:
> Cr@p so it does happen! (was my main fear when using my teeth...)

It has been known - question is, are you a gurner or a blurter? ;O)
I never fail to shriek like a girl when I fall off, so it's really not something I worry about.

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