/ Stretch regime for a cyclist that climbs, help needed

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
ti_pin_man - on 21 Oct 2013
As a long term cyclist, 22 years, I find that my recent move to bouldering has uncovered that many cyclists have really crap hib mobility. i think the same is said of runners. I certainly know its true.

To help I've done some yoga and do some ad hoc stretches but I'm after a ten minute set of stretches specific to a hip mobility, kind of a 101 class of stuff that will help when I do my core bodywork sessions three times a week. Anybody know any youtube vidz that have short sessions covering just this flexibility?

If not perhaps i shouldnt be lazy and put five - six stretcvhes together... but ideally it would be great to have something to follow.
Al Evans on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to ti_pin_man: This from an earlier thread
"7. You have to stretch before exercise
Stretching before exercise is the main way to improve performance and avoid injury, everyone stretches but researchers have been finding that it actually slows you down. Experts reveal that stretching before a run can result in a 5 percent reduction of efficiency; meanwhile, Italian researchers studying cyclists confirmed that stretching is counterproductive. Furthermore, there has never been sufficient scientific evidence that pre-exercise stretching reduces injury risk."
ti_pin_man - on 21 Oct 2013
I want to stretch on the days I dont climb and not just before a climb, my warm up is a 'get my heart going and blood pumping to my fingers' type of thing.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Marek - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to ti_pin_man:
> I want to stretch on the days I dont climb and not just before a climb, my warm up is a 'get my heart going and blood pumping to my fingers' type of thing.

The only exception I can think of is when you know that a route (or perhaps just one move) is going to push the limits of your mobility (e.g., a slabby no-hands rockover). Then it may make sense to prepare immediately prior to the attempt. Efficiency and strength are of limited use if you can't get your foot onto the hold in the first place.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.