/ critique my climbing wall design please.. before we build it.

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pork pie girl - on 28 Oct 2013
very briefly...

space we're planning on using for phase one of the wall is 10 ft wide x10 ft long x10 ft high (got loads more space available but want to keep it at this right now)

building it at the back of the garage

two facing walls will have a 40 degree board meeting 20 degree board at the top (so facing each other and meeting at the top ..which they will just about do given the space we're using)

side walls and back wall of garage will be used as support, back wall of garage will just be flat as not much of it left because of the angle of the two side boards

in terms of possibility oftw*tting ourselves on the opposite wall are these angles realistic.. we thought so but want to know what you lot think.

ta

PPG

GeoffRadcliffe - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl: If the boards meet at the top, won't that mean that the top parts of the boards will not be usable as there won't be room to fit holds that can be used?

My personal preference would be for a steep board of around 30 degrees and another of around 15 degrees. I have found that if the board is too steep, I had to use large footholds to be be able to keep my feet on.
pork pie girl - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to GeoffRadcliffe: that's what we're not sure about.. i.e. the top bit.. we're happy with the decision re board angle as it's similar to what we train on at our local wall and get quite a bit out of it.

just wondering if anyone has used a similar design
Graham T - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

When I built mine I messed about with the idea of having two angled panels meeting at the top. But as someone said, it does mean you lose the top foot or so of usable space.
In the end I built a 40 degree overhang, then a flat roof, and a slightly angled panel on the other side. It works well as it means you can use the full height of the panels on all walls, it also significantly adds an amount of swing space, if you come off near the top with the panels joining, you are going to smash yourself on the other wall.
pork pie girl - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to Graham T: hmmm.. cheers I thought there'd be a chance of knocking ourselves on the otherside.. without it built and just seeing drawings it's difficult to decide what to do. don't mind losing as bit of use at the top but don't want movement to be restricted.

what sort of angle do you have on the opposite wall?

we are thinking of adding another 20 degree wall nearby without anything opposite it.
Graham T - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:
I have got a 40 degree ish overhang, then about a 3-4ft horizontal roof, then a combination. One 4ft panel is vertical, the other one is an angled overhang that is about 15 degrees. Kind of difficult to explain.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamt1980/8314962603/
That is from the wrong side unfortunately. The overhang on the right is at an angle and goes to vertical at the other side.
Gives plenty of falling space from the big overhang. And the roof is a lot of fun to play on. Even if it is a bit small
pork pie girl - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to Graham T: this is really helpful... what height is it?

light at the top is a good plan too

good storage space too... we were going to go for an adjustable wall but thought the storage space would be useful
Graham T - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

Its about 10 ft high from the crash mats, so nearer 11 from the floor. The storage is massively useful, put most of our bikes behind it. I think the space for the overhangs was about an 11 ft box. Then a bit more managed to fit round the back of the garage door. I think overall there are 9 or 10 sheets of 8 ft by 4 ft ply in there. So about 300 square feet of climbing surface.
Is good but amazingly hard on your skin for some reason.
Graham T - on 28 Oct 2013
In reply to Graham T:
Message me through the forum if you want, I can give you some more details. I built the thing to last, I suspect it is the strongest structure in our house to be honest.
Mike00010 - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

Best thing I've found is to make a little model out of balsa wood or similar then you can check the angles and whether falling will cause you to clash with something, etc.

Mike
Lessworkmoreclimbing - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:
The model for ours was only cereal packet but really useful. Ours was two different angle boards next to each other. I was just wondering with your design - given that you say you have more space - whether only one person can climb at once and if so would that bother you? But having any wall of your own is so great, you'll love it, get building!!
pork pie girl - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Lessworkmoreclimbing:one at once won't be a problem of we're climbing hard enough.. Want to use the wall.to work power endurance..,so won't be on it for ages before I need to rest.. We are going to out another 20 m board next to it at some point too.

I'm really motivated and think a good bike ride followed by a training wall session makes for a perfect day.. Especially when tea can be cooking whist you train a :-)

Good idea about cereal packet.. We originally thought about to boards next to each other at different angles but only wanted this if they could be,adjustable so we have options with use if garage space.. Ie if we get made redundant we want to put all of belongings in the, and garage, rent the house out and go travelling!
French Erick - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:
How wide is the space?
I have seen a great set up which has a 45 degree board of around 1m20 wide with a 40cm kickboard.
By the side, same kickboard, there is a 30 degree board. That creates a hanging groove which is vertical but could also be overhanging at 10degree?
Both sides (left of 45 and right of 30) could be vertical and off vertical for the same length as the overhangs?

I feel that 2 overhangs meeting is not a great use of space unless there is enough of a roof( say a meter) for a nice transition and top moves with swings.
JIMBO on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl: forget building a wall... build a campus board and other training apparatus... much better use of the small space.
pork pie girl - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to JIMBO: that stuff may end up there eventually anyway.. But I much prefer climbing to get stronger.. I might end up doing more training type exercises at some point.

The space is big..,10 feet wide by about 35 feet long and 10 feet high. The space.we want touse first is 10 feet x 10 feet x 10 feet

pork pie girl - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to French Erick: going to use a space that is ten feet wide, ten feet long and ten feet high.

Think we could do a four foot roof between the two over hanging walls.

Fraser on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

Don't forget to factor in that the edges won't be very usable. ie if the room/garage is 10' wide (wall to wall), you will realistically only have a 7-8' climbable bit in the middle. Don't have the two angled boards meeting at an apex, definitely separate them with a narrow section of roof.

If it were me, I'd probably just have a decent, mono-pitched, 45° woodie. Had I the space available I'd have done mine that way. As it is, it's about 17° and 10' x 10'.
Fraser on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

Sorry, missed your 22:14 post when typing. By the sounds of it you'll have plenty of room for climbing to the edges and flagging / swinging etc if it's a 35' long space!
pork pie girl - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to Fraser: just done some more drawings.. Swaying towards to different angles side by side now.
becauseitsthere - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

Here are csome pics of my garage wall. Might be of use.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dave_eadie/sets/72157637119585043/
ads.ukclimbing.com
pork pie girl - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl: cheers that's really helpful
jkarran - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:

You'll have no usable headroom if the boards meet at the top, it'll be useless. Make one adjustable board, it's cheaper and it'll feel less claustrophobic.

jk
David Coley - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl: have a look at my profile picture for a self supporting design.
luke obrien - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to pork pie girl: I went for 1 adjustable angle wall (fixed on chains so you can adjust it, but in practice I rarely change it). 2 20-30 degree angle walls, one with a cut away for campus board. Over the top there is a board for some monkeying around with finger boards at either end. There are some photos in my gallery if they help to give you any ideas. The mat below was a present from my wife and has probably saved my back a few times when I have dropped off
Chris wilson on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to pork pie girl:
Here's a picture of mine which has a 30 and 45 degree angled boards side by side. I originally built the 30 and then added the 45. Makes for interesting traverses between the two and you get an aręte. I like the variety of angles but prefer the 30 as I can use a bigger variety of holds on it (stronger people may prefer 45)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chriswilson2011/6447579113/
pork pie girl - on 02 Nov 2013
In reply to Chris wilson: cheers for everyones advice.. Definitely not going for the forty five meeting the twenty at the top.. Same angles probably side by side and that should do for starters.

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